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Author Topic: Children and Grafting  (Read 169 times)

Nayelie321

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Children and Grafting
« on: August 10, 2018, 12:14:16 PM »
So I need a bit of help. I recently grafted a few mango trees using the whip graft method(no tongue) just to try it out. Yesterday my niece came over and wanted to know how grafting works, so my little brother went and showed her some grafted plants. For some reason they had the bright idea of removing the para film
Tape off one of my recently grafted mangoes(3 days old) to see how it begins callusing. Long story short is that they removed it and the scion was still in place so today I re-wrapped it with parafilm to see if it still survives. My question is what are the chances of survival if there was some cambium binding beginning.

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Children and Grafting
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2018, 12:19:29 PM »
i'm far from an expert on grafting but i would say that as long as the union was not torqued or disturbed and it wasn't exposed long enough to cause dessication, you're probably no worse off.
But I could be totally wrong.
 ;D

behlgarden

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Re: Children and Grafting
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2018, 05:17:58 PM »
So I need a bit of help. I recently grafted a few mango trees using the whip graft method(no tongue) just to try it out. Yesterday my niece came over and wanted to know how grafting works, so my little brother went and showed her some grafted plants. For some reason they had the bright idea of removing the para film
Tape off one of my recently grafted mangoes(3 days old) to see how it begins callusing. Long story short is that they removed it and the scion was still in place so today I re-wrapped it with parafilm to see if it still survives. My question is what are the chances of survival if there was some cambium binding beginning.

if in doubt, I would remove the wood, make new cut from same wood and graft again. I have successfully moved grafts in some cases 3 times due to rootstock failure. Not sure about parafilm but buddy tape keeps grafts fresh for a long time. Key is to watch grafts every day and any sign of rootstock failure and green wood trigger moving that wood onto another stock.

Cookie Monster

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Re: Children and Grafting
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2018, 06:32:20 PM »
It's probably OK. Does it look desiccated?
Jeff  :-)

bsbullie

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Re: Children and Grafting
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2018, 06:36:39 PM »
Here I thought someone was grafting children..
- Rob

John Travis

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Re: Children and Grafting
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2018, 07:22:16 PM »
Here I thought someone was grafting children..
and I thought we were getting children to do the grafting for us. My kids are interested in my work but I donít trust them with knives just yet. Lol
John

Nayelie321

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Re: Children and Grafting
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2018, 07:52:55 PM »
It's probably OK. Does it look desiccated?

Seemed fine to me. No drying of shriveling of Any kind. Hopefully it survives since itís a new variety Iím trying to add to my collection

 

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