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Author Topic: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?  (Read 2158 times)

franckm

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Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« on: August 14, 2014, 01:48:41 PM »
Hi everybody,

I've just received some seedlings from Japan. Labelled Anamatsu daidai. Have anyone heard about it, or is this an invalid name of something else ?

Thanks for your help,

Franck

Millet

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2014, 05:01:50 PM »
If I remember correctly  Anamatsu daidai is a Japanese pummelo variety.  I have seen them sold at the South East Citrus Expo in years past.  I have not actually tasted them, but I heard that the taste is quite good.  It has been years since I have heard of that variety.  However, unfortunately I do not believe that Anamatsu daidai comes true from seed. Therefore, it will be unknown what your seedling will turn out to be. Take Care - Millet

franckm

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2014, 05:53:54 PM »
Thanks for your informations Millet. I'll try and we'll check in ten years how it tastes  ;D

SoCal2warm

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2019, 06:54:14 PM »
I have Natsu daidai. I plucked one of the fruits from a big tree in the Los Angeles county Arboretum. (The tree was loaded with fruits and many had already fallen to the ground, so I didn't think anyone would mind)

I believe this tree is also known as Natsumikan (best translation: Summer Orange) in Japan. I think Amanatsu may be a particular variety of Natsumikan that is a little bit sweeter.

The fruits are like a mix between orange, grapefruit, and sour orange, and have just a little bit more bitterness than a grapefruit. I was able to enjoy eating it, but I'm not sure if everyone would. Certainly something different, a delicacy.
 The flavor and aroma were reminiscent of Jamaican Ugli fruit (another type of grapefruit).

It would probably make great marmalade too.

Oh, also to mention, unlike normal grapefruit the pith is sweet and not bitter. They make candied rind out of this fruit in Japan.

It has a fairly high number of seeds, so I have germinated a few.

It probably has a level of cold hardiness similar to Satsuma mandarin, I would guess.
I read one report of someone in London growing a Natsumikan tree right up against the side of their house unprotected and it fruited. (Not sure how much this really demonstrates cold hardiness though because I've also seen a picture of a big grapefruit tree fruiting up against an apartment block in London, and the temperatures within the city don't really drop that low)

I've also read a report the fruits can survive on the tree down to 18 °F, perhaps due to the protective effect of the thick skin, which would be fairly remarkable if true.

The fruits ripen in Summer, so need to stay on the tree through the Winter.

The original story in Japan is that this variety originated when a woman on the East side of Japan found a fruit washed up on the sea shore, and grew the seeds.

« Last Edit: April 18, 2019, 07:18:29 PM by SoCal2warm »

Ilya11

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2019, 03:58:32 AM »
"
Natsudaidai (Natsumikan) is a natural hybrid of pomelo and sour orange.
The original seedling tree of this fruit is said to have been found in a garden in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan, toward the end of the 17th century and is reported still alive. The value of its late-ripening characteristic was not appreciated until approximately a century later and is reflected in the names most commonly used for it: (natsu means summer) Natsudaidai, summer sour orange and Natsumikan summer orange.

Fruit medium to medium-large (grapefruit size), sometimes with very short collared neck and apex slightly depressed; moderately seedy. Color yellowish-orange. Rind medium-thick; surface coarsely pebbled slightly rough. Segments fairly numerous (12); axis large and semi-hollow at maturity. Flavor acid and refreshing. Late in maturity (summer-maturing in most climates). Holds well on the tree and improves in storage.

The Natsudaidai tree is reported to be less cold resistant than the satsuma mandarin in Japan. Heat requirement for fruit maturity somewhat less than that of the grapefruit and comparable with the so-called Poorman orange and Wheeny grapefruit, both of which attain acceptable quality in climates too cool for satisfactory maturity of the grapefruit. Nevertheless, even at full maturity the Natsudaidai remains too acid for some palates.

Natsudaidai is grown commercially in the Japanese coastal regions of mildest winters in Kumamoto and Ehime prefecture. The rough textured fruit is easy to peel and is commonly eaten fresh. It is currently second in importance only to the satsuma mandarin. It is also used for wide variety of products ranging from marmalades to alcoholic beverages.

Numerous unnamed clones and selections are grown, some of which exhibit minor differences, but only two derivative varieties—Kawano and Tajima— are propagated commercially. Kawano differs from the common Natsudaidai in the fact that the fruit is less acid (and hence sweeter), matures much earlier, and loses quality if held on the tree after maturity. Tajima is a new and very juicy, late-ripening, high acid variety of much less importance, but considered to be promising.

The best-known varieties are: Amanatsu, Beni Amanatsu, Kawano, Tajima and Natsudaidai.

Natsudaidai is also known as Natsukan, Daidai mikan, Ri ben ku ju, Tajima.
"
From http://citruspages.free.fr/souroranges.html
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Sylvain

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2019, 06:37:59 AM »
Franck, peux-tu corriger le titre? C'est amanatsu, non pas anamatsu.

Radoslav

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2019, 07:33:45 AM »
I think that natsumikan is not eaten fresh. Collected in late summer, fruits are stored until next summer to lower the acidity and bitterness.
Also I think that trees are planted together with citrus flaviculpus as pollinator.


SoCal2warm

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2019, 03:19:22 PM »
I think that natsumikan is not eaten fresh.
I think it can be eaten fresh, in my opinion, having tasted it. I tasted it in the Winter, so it had probably been hanging on the tree since Summer.
If you like bitter grapefruits or enjoy Ugli fruit.

It's certainly much more palatable than Chinotto sour orange.

But again, even though the inside has grapefruit bitterness, the white pith just under the peel doesn't have any bitterness, so in a certain way that makes it easier to eat because you don't have to worry about peeling off all the pith from the segments.

Laaz

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2019, 03:53:02 PM »
The Daidai citrus I've had at past citrus shows were nasty bitter orange. I wouldn't eat it but that's just me. A lot of people pushing zones seems to think certain "hardy" citrus is OK, I prefer the actual quality citrus. If it doen't kill you, then yeah it's eatable, but sure the hell isn't good...

SoCal2warm

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Re: Anamatsu dai dai ? Does anybody know ?
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2019, 04:46:47 PM »
The Daidai citrus I've had at past citrus shows were nasty bitter orange. I wouldn't eat it but that's just me.
That was no doubt Citrus taiwanica, Nanshodaidai, a very different fruit.

(Natsu means Summer in Japanese, while Nansho was the name the Japanese used to refer to the prefecture that is today Taiwan)
« Last Edit: April 19, 2019, 04:50:01 PM by SoCal2warm »

 

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