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Author Topic: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting  (Read 862 times)

starch

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I have two Spondias purpurea. I really love the trees. They grow fast, take the heat, have beautiful foliage and I like the fruit! I have one in the ground and one in 5 gallon bucket. Both trees are ~6 ft tall.

So I have a question for those that have been growing them for awhile:

The one in the pot will eventually go in the ground. I have a potential spot for it that is next to a block wall and some pool equipment (there used to be a large queen palm there).

I know the Spondias purpurea will grow great there (will take the heat and sun just fine). But what about the roots? Will the root system eventually cause a problem with these nearby structures and equipment? The tree is from a rooted cutting (not a seedling tree). I would think that would tend to make the root system less invasive, but I am not basing that off anything except a gut feel.
- Mark

Nayelie321

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2018, 05:08:53 PM »
From personal experience the root system has never been much of a problem for me. I have a 15ft tall tree with a trunk diamete of over a foot right next to my storage garage. I started it from a cutting. There is also a waterline next to it approximately 6 feet away and itís has gotten no damage. My tree has been in the ground for 12 years. During pruning I usually just stick the cut branches in the ground and they root readily however I do dispose of them after some time usually a year. They have a vigorous root system but itís nothing that will break through a wall. I also have a three year old plant that is in a seed bed that I left to grow right next to my fence and it has not compromised it. IDE recommend you planting it at least 5 feed from the wall or structure just as a precaution but personally you have nothing to worry about in terms of roots.

starch

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2018, 10:40:58 AM »
From personal experience the root system has never been much of a problem for me. I have a 15ft tall tree with a trunk diamete of over a foot right next to my storage garage. I started it from a cutting. There is also a waterline next to it approximately 6 feet away and itís has gotten no damage. My tree has been in the ground for 12 years. During pruning I usually just stick the cut branches in the ground and they root readily however I do dispose of them after some time usually a year. They have a vigorous root system but itís nothing that will break through a wall. I also have a three year old plant that is in a seed bed that I left to grow right next to my fence and it has not compromised it. IDE recommend you planting it at least 5 feed from the wall or structure just as a precaution but personally you have nothing to worry about in terms of roots.

Nayelie,

Thanks for the comment, this is the level of detailed feedback I was looking for (whether good or bad)! And I am very glad to hear that your experience is a positive one.
- Mark

buddy roo

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2018, 11:33:10 AM »
so what dose the fruit taste like????

starch

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2018, 12:46:27 PM »
so what dose the fruit taste like????

Hey Patrick, It has a plum flavor with a tropical overtone (not quite pineapple). The flavor is best (IMO) when you leave it on the tree to get soft. The downside is that it is a large seed on a small fruit (i.e. it wouldn't replace an actual plum). But I like the flavor and definitely think it's worth growing.

- Mark

Coach62

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2018, 06:21:24 PM »
I just pruned my hog plum and rooted a few cuttings.  I had 6 total, 3 I trimmed most of the leaves off of and left a couple of half leaves on it.  3 I left quite a bit of leaves on.  To my surprise, the cuttings with not much leaf all died quickly.  The cuttings with lots of leaves took off quickly.  I just stuck them in a pot with regular soil that had been outside for some time after a quick rooting hormone treatment.

I had expected the heavily leafed cuttings to dry out and die, but it was just the opposite.

Was this your experience?
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pineislander

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2018, 09:17:35 AM »
For what it's worth, last year I cut one of these down. The wood is very spongy, soft and wet. It would not pass through my wood chipper just tore up and clogged the machine. I also dug out the stump and the roots were likewise.

Nayelie321

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2018, 12:37:30 AM »
I just pruned my hog plum and rooted a few cuttings.  I had 6 total, 3 I trimmed most of the leaves off of and left a couple of half leaves on it.  3 I left quite a bit of leaves on.  To my surprise, the cuttings with not much leaf all died quickly.  The cuttings with lots of leaves took off quickly.  I just stuck them in a pot with regular soil that had been outside for some time after a quick rooting hormone treatment.

I had expected the heavily leafed cuttings to dry out and die, but it was just the opposite.

Was this your experience?

I leave my cuttings with all the leaves intact. I simply push them into the soil. They root after a month or so. I use 4-6ft long cuttings with a minimum of 2 inches of thickness. Never failed me. This is for the red hog plum. The yellow variety is another story since they are shy when it comes to rooting and require more care.

I personally donít like them ripe. Instead I eat them unripe or slightly ripe with a bit of salt. Itís not my favorite but most of my friends love it so I grow it.

pineislander

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Re: Red Hog Plum (Spondias purpurea) tree roots when rooted from cutting
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2018, 04:54:04 AM »
They bear heavy and if a large tree there may be too many to eat. This fruit makes a good wine, ferment ripe fruit whole with skin intact it will have a slight red tinge.

 

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