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Author Topic: Big Jump Forward In Greening Cure?  (Read 527 times)


luak

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Re: Big Jump Forward In Greening Cure?
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2018, 08:31:28 PM »
Millet, I guess I don’t have to worry about my tree’s. I read the article and I am taking care of my tree’s just like the articles, I also use Peter,s MOST, micro,s.

Trees in my area are changes color.

Isaac-1

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Re: Big Jump Forward In Greening Cure?
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2018, 12:18:24 AM »
While we are talking about HLB, has anyone else read this one https://www.nature.com/articles/s41438-018-0038-x

fyliu

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Re: Big Jump Forward In Greening Cure?
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2018, 12:29:15 AM »
Luak, how are you doing the same thing to your trees like the article?
The article is about making more of the HLB bacteria for study.

Am I reading the wrong article?

luak

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Re: Big Jump Forward In Greening Cure?
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2018, 08:24:45 AM »
You have to read the whole thing, several articles about feeding your tree,s.

fyliu

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Re: Big Jump Forward In Greening Cure?
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2018, 12:42:28 PM »
Oh you read the related articles in the links at the bottom. I usually ignore those but that one sounds useful.

Millet

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Re: Big Jump Forward In Greening Cure?
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2018, 09:57:44 PM »


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Texas A&M AgriLife Research:
Potential breakthrough could help against citrus greening
As citrus greening continues to devastate Florida's citrus crop, researchers think they've discovered a way to gain new insights into the disease, which, in turn, could help the industry finally defeat it.

So far, researchers have been unable to isolate the bacteria that causes greening; to study the disease researchers have been forced to grow trees, then study their roots. But now, Texas A&M AgriLife Research is reporting promise in rapidly culturing and reproducing the pathogens and microbes that cause the disease in the laboratory.

The breakthrough, announced last week, could be a game-changer, industry officials said. While it doesn't cure the disease in and of itself, the research could allow the industry to "more efficiently and cost effectively find a workable defense against fastidious pathogens and microbes like citrus greening.”

Any progress is welcome news in the fight against greening, which is spread by tiny Asian citrus psyllid and has decimated the state's citrus crop. According to eu.tcpalm.com, it has lost more than 60 percent of its production since the 2003-04 growing seaso  (Fruit Pages)

 

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