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Author Topic: Foliar spray  (Read 512 times)

CanadianCitrus

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Foliar spray
« on: September 22, 2018, 03:12:31 PM »
Hello all!

Winter is rolling around here in Canada (6 inches of snow where I live) and I am trying to give my 3 plants the best chance to thrive/survive the winter. I have 1 Eureka lemon, 1 navel orange and 1 key lime. I fertilize them once a month with a 30-10-10 water soluble fertilizer with minerals. . I understand that citrus are heavy nitrogen feeders. Can I use my same 30-10-10 fertilizer as a foliar spray to try and give the plants some extra nitrogen to help keep them thriving over the winter? Or should I go with something else?

Thanks!

brian

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Re: Foliar spray
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2018, 10:44:17 AM »
You might not need much fertilizer over the winter in canada as you likely won't see much growth.  You should be fine using your liquid fert as foliar if you reduce the concentration.  I believe I've read foliar fert is absorbed at 10x the rate compared to through roots, so you'd use 10% of the concentration.  Also I've heard foliar feeding of iron-containing fert isn't recommended.  I've done foliar feeding with a liquid fert that contains a small amount of iron though with no issues.  I don't know what a safe amount is, could never get a clear answer.

CanadianCitrus

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Re: Foliar spray
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2018, 06:33:51 PM »
Could I use something like a blood meal that is 12-0-0 NPK in the form of a foliar feed? Obviously I would dilute it, but I wonder if that would work.

Tom

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Re: Foliar spray
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2018, 07:15:34 PM »
I think you’d be making a huge mistake to fertilize this late in Canada or anywhere you’d have frost in the northern hemisphere this late in the year.

CanadianCitrus

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Re: Foliar spray
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2018, 08:33:30 PM »
I totally agree on the weather conditions with respect to a northern climate. Due to my geographical location in Canada, it gets rather cold for longer periods of time. My plants can only be outside for around 3 months (4 if I am lucky) per year. I have two CFL bulbs (55 and 42 watts) feeding my 3 small plants. My eureka lemon is still budding new leaves and my key lime is flowering.

With signs of new growth still happening and the protection of being indoors, would it still be safe to do a bit of foliar feeding as there is no risk of frost damage?

Many thanks!

laidbackdood

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Re: Foliar spray
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2018, 11:53:02 PM »
Hello all!

Winter is rolling around here in Canada (6 inches of snow where I live) and I am trying to give my 3 plants the best chance to thrive/survive the winter. I have 1 Eureka lemon, 1 navel orange and 1 key lime. I fertilize them once a month with a 30-10-10 water soluble fertilizer with minerals. . I understand that citrus are heavy nitrogen feeders. Can I use my same 30-10-10 fertilizer as a foliar spray to try and give the plants some extra nitrogen to help keep them thriving over the winter? Or should I go with something else?

Thanks!
seaweed is excellent as foliar feed....supplies trace elements as well.......but if their is no growth going on.......i wouldnt get too carried away........the biggest concern is keeping them on the dry side of moist.....because temps are lower they transpire far less......if they get plenty of rain....they stay too wet and the roots will rot........you didnt mention if they are inground or in pots........we have just come out of winter and i kept my trees under the eaves and away from the heavy rain.......collected rain water and i decided when they should have water.....not the climate.......wet feet is the biggest killer of citrus.....so watch for that....when spring comes.........give them an all mighty flush to get rid of salts ....apply your slow release ferts and then kick them into life with a liquid feed of fish/seaweed......the slow release might take a little while to kick in....so the liquid feed gives them stuff right now........Do this when you see the bud break.....its spring in perth west aussie now and all my trees are going nuts........most important time.....to do the right thing for your trees.........like millet said......one month before the spring burst....foliar feed with something high in urea but not a high does.......I did this to all my trees and my friends and all of them are covered in blooms......winter is a boring time except for some citrus like meyer lemon/lemonade that fruit all year round and grow anytime....most citrus take a nap during winter....If there is growth going on in winter....then i would feed but half strength    and good idea bringing them in out of the cold.........when you put back out in spring......gradually acclimatize them back with the sun ......so there is no shock....same with taking them in.....maybe just go in at night to start.  .Good luck.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2018, 11:56:52 PM by laidbackdood »

CanadianCitrus

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Re: Foliar spray
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2018, 01:42:05 PM »
Thanks for the reply!

My plants are actually primarily indoor plants. I can only have them outdoors 3 maybe 4 months per year as it is too cold here. I think I will try and find a liquid fertilizer and spray them in small amounts. I am still getting new growth (leaves and flowers).

Thanks!

lebmung

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Re: Foliar spray
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2018, 02:19:45 AM »
Yes under artificial light and suffering free and sufficient heat the plants continue to grow. So you should fertilize them, but less often.
I suggest you use a high potassium fertilizer such potassium nitrate or potassium sulphate. 1g/L every 2 weeks + microelementes.
The reason I suggest you this is because the cells will thicken thus making the plant more resistant to cold. Nitrogen will make you need growth will will elongate in search of light.

 

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