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Author Topic: Indoor citrus/fruit tree grow lights?  (Read 1308 times)

ThangBom321

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Re: Indoor citrus/fruit tree grow lights?
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2018, 01:09:03 AM »
First I will say hello.  This is my first post after lurking for a couple of years.  Also thanks for all the useful information you folks post on here it has been of great help.

I have used a huge T5 unit 4 foot 12 bulb for the last couple of years as a primary light source in winter.I had considered traditional 1000 watt and even cmh 315 watt options but they would have been within inches of wooden support beams so I decided it wasn't worth the risk.  My experience with T5 has been that it will keep the trees alive but they will not thrive under them especially when used as a primary source.  Replacement bulbs are pricey with the risk of breakage in transport.  When I purchased this unit Led lights were expensive and I didn't care for the options.  I need a new light for a single Tangerine tree which will be by itself in front of the patio door.  I have found two options that appear to be good options but I cannot vouch for them at this point.  The first is Quantum boards from Horticulture lighting group.  I have no affiliation with them and will probably avoid them due to high shipping cost to Canada.  If you are in America they ship for free so it might be a good option for lighting. 

The alternative is to build my own Led light using Samsung F strips which ends up being cheaper.  I will be building a light using either 4 or 5 two foot F strips for my Tangerine.  If it works well I will build a unit using 4 foot strips for my trees that receive no sun.  I have not seen either this type of build or a Quantum board build used for Citrus so I cannot vouch for them yet.  Marijuana growers seem to really like both of these types of lights for efficiency and heat reduction as well as good penetration.  I will update on the lights once I see some results.

This link below talks about 3 different Samsung strip leds and a bridgelux.  It also shows grow light configurations that can be built using the strips.  It's a nice little guide.

http://ledgardener.com/diy-led-strip-build-designs-samsung-bridgelux/


Ah, very good info. I forgot about DIY kits. Again, in reference to feeding, we call them retrofit kits. They are simply the wires, ballast and endcaps or sockets to connect the bulbs. It's a bare bone diy option if all you want is a light system.

Good post North.

Empoweredandfree

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Re: Indoor citrus/fruit tree grow lights?
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2018, 02:37:01 AM »
Great breakdown, thank you.....Good point about the amount of lights needed for LED as opposed to Halide. How does T5 stack up to these two?

I also had t5 HO (high output) lighting on my reefing tank. T5 are nice but they have limited use. They don't pack as much of a punch as far as light output but they work well enough. I used them as supplement lighting over my reef. The MH did most of the growing and the T5 in good reflectors supplied the "color pop" for my corals. What you Reflectors are key to getting the most out of T5 HO lighting systems. T5 is actually the size of the bulbs. They are thinner than T8 bulbs. These are the ones you typically see in the ceilings of office buildings and such. Due to the smaller size, T5 you can fit more bulbs in the same space. Adding a good parabolic reflector greatly increases your lighting downward. Reflectors simply redirect light to where we can benefit from it. T5 bulbs are long and tubular. They are usually laid flat on a horizontal plane. The The light shines 360 degrees however, we generally only place plants on 1 side, usually under the light. Well, if we only place plants on 1 side of the 360 degree shining bulb, we will only use 180degrees of the light produced. By placing a good reflector above these bulbs, we are able to reflect this wasted top half (the other 180 degree of light) downward to be used.

A simple break down of light wave length is with ROYGBIV (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet). Colors on the left are easier to produce and require less energy to produce. Natural sun light is something like 5200k to 5700k IRRC. The lower the number the more you go left in color. Just take a look at the bulbs at the big box stores and see what I mean. You will notice that these bulbs of the same type will be cheaper and produce more candles/lumens for watt the more left you go. The opposite is true as you move right. The more violet (right) you go, the more energy (watt) is needed to produce the same amount of candles/lumens.

Thangbom
[/quote]

 Thank you, I don't see T5 as being worth it based on your info and other reading. The thought of high heat makes me nervous as I live alone aside from my Mother who has health challanges. God forbid a fire breaks out.

Empoweredandfree

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Re: Indoor citrus/fruit tree grow lights?
« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2018, 02:40:44 AM »
First I will say hello.  This is my first post after lurking for a couple of years.  Also thanks for all the useful information you folks post on here it has been of great help.

I have used a huge T5 unit 4 foot 12 bulb for the last couple of years as a primary light source in winter.I had considered traditional 1000 watt and even cmh 315 watt options but they would have been within inches of wooden support beams so I decided it wasn't worth the risk.  My experience with T5 has been that it will keep the trees alive but they will not thrive under them especially when used as a primary source.  Replacement bulbs are pricey with the risk of breakage in transport.  When I purchased this unit Led lights were expensive and I didn't care for the options.  I need a new light for a single Tangerine tree which will be by itself in front of the patio door.  I have found two options that appear to be good options but I cannot vouch for them at this point.  The first is Quantum boards from Horticulture lighting group.  I have no affiliation with them and will probably avoid them due to high shipping cost to Canada.  If you are in America they ship for free so it might be a good option for lighting. 

The alternative is to build my own Led light using Samsung F strips which ends up being cheaper.  I will be building a light using either 4 or 5 two foot F strips for my Tangerine.  If it works well I will build a unit using 4 foot strips for my trees that receive no sun.  I have not seen either this type of build or a Quantum board build used for Citrus so I cannot vouch for them yet.  Marijuana growers seem to really like both of these types of lights for efficiency and heat reduction as well as good penetration.  I will update on the lights once I see some results.

This link below talks about 3 different Samsung strip leds and a bridgelux.  It also shows grow light configurations that can be built using the strips.  It's a nice little guide.

http://ledgardener.com/diy-led-strip-build-designs-samsung-bridgelux/


 Thanks for your info. This looks quite interesting and a good way to provide light without as much heat or energy usage. I'm actually thinking of doing an LED and CFL lighting system. I'm thininking now how to arrange the lights...Clamp lamps? shelving?

 

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