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Author Topic: Difficulties with pulasan  (Read 378 times)

Reafs

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Difficulties with pulasan
« on: October 06, 2018, 07:04:43 AM »
In the past 4 years, i ordered many times pulasan seeds from different sellers . Sometimes they arrived normal other time sprouting, but I never succeeded at growing them.

I tried to put them straight into the soil,  in coton, in water, with more watering and less, without any fail I didnít succeed. ;) always the same result the seeds rot, after few days full of small worms.

How do you do? How can I grow them?
Yohann

Stevo

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2018, 07:12:27 AM »
They don't like to be too wet.They will rot if they are exposed to too much water

Kada

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2018, 10:57:24 AM »
I have had good success with washing well and germinating in sphagnum moss that's mixed half half with dry and wet then squeezed moss.  Shipped pulasan many times this way with near 100%success.  We grow them in regular heavy ish clay like soil in pots before transplanting.  Check your pot holes. Some pots like those cheap flimsy black types sit flat on the ground.  If on concrete they tend to stay soggy.  If you plant a drainage media like chips, rock etc not an issue.  So maybe like Steve mentions, roots are too wet. Cleaning seeds well goes a long way, but is time consuming.

Reafs

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2018, 12:58:14 PM »
I have had good success with washing well and germinating in sphagnum moss that's mixed half half with dry and wet then squeezed moss.  Shipped pulasan many times this way with near 100%success.  We grow them in regular heavy ish clay like soil in pots before transplanting.  Check your pot holes. Some pots like those cheap flimsy black types sit flat on the ground.  If on concrete they tend to stay soggy.  If you plant a drainage media like chips, rock etc not an issue.  So maybe like Steve mentions, roots are too wet. Cleaning seeds well goes a long way, but is time consuming.

Thanks, I was thinking  to try with vermiculite to see if it can grow
Yohann

SoCal2warm

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2018, 05:03:24 PM »
I would suggest keeping them inside a greenhouse, or enclosure with artificial lighting to hold in the humidity. When they are first sprouting, they need humidity and moisture, and are vulnerable to drying out. But pretty soon they can become vulnerable to root rot if there's too much moisture in the soil. It's a narrow range, so it can be difficult. I would suggest using larger containers, that are bigger than how far the roots expand out. More soil volume helps to keep the soil moisture level more constant, so it doesn't dry out or get too wet. For example, a 3-inch high seedling might need a 8-inch wide container. 8-inch high seedling, then 12 foot wide container. Make sure to use good quality soil that's both good at holding moisture but won't hold too much water. Also for young seedlings, don't expose them to full sun. Their small root systems can't handle the water draw from that level of evaporation. Make sure the soil is fairly loose too, so there's air in there for the roots. You know there's too much water if the water has displaced all the air in the soil. Roots need to breathe, as well as moisture.

Pulasan is also the most tropical member of the lychee family, so I would keep the temperatures from going down too low. (maybe above 67 all the time, and usually in the range between 77 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit)
« Last Edit: October 09, 2018, 05:08:22 PM by SoCal2warm »

fruitlovers

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2018, 06:01:59 PM »
I have had good success with washing well and germinating in sphagnum moss that's mixed half half with dry and wet then squeezed moss.  Shipped pulasan many times this way with near 100%success.  We grow them in regular heavy ish clay like soil in pots before transplanting.  Check your pot holes. Some pots like those cheap flimsy black types sit flat on the ground.  If on concrete they tend to stay soggy.  If you plant a drainage media like chips, rock etc not an issue.  So maybe like Steve mentions, roots are too wet. Cleaning seeds well goes a long way, but is time consuming.

Thanks, I was thinking  to try with vermiculite to see if it can grow
Sphagnum moss works better than vermiculite as a medium. Sphagnum moss is very acidic (low pH) and helps to inhibit rotting. Pulasan seeds, like rambutan seeds are susceptible to mold. Main problem is pulp that sticks to the seeds is hard completely clean off, Any very tiny piece of pulp will start molding process. So it's really good to spend the time to clean them off very meticulously. Once they start sprouting the molding is not a problem.
Oscar

Tang Tonic

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2018, 09:14:58 AM »
I bought some from Han Sen in Malaysia (see the for sale section of this forum) among others such as Rambutan, Seashore Mangosteen, Purple Mangosteen, etc.

All the Pulasan sprouted and all the other seeds sprouted.  When they arrived to me, they all had roots from being packaged in vermiculite.  I made a mixture of peat moss, local soil, double chipped mulch, and some sand.  They are all doing great. 

I have similar climate here in St. Croix as Guadeloupe.  The rainy season just started so that probably helped with keeping them happy.

On a side note, would love to visit Guadeloupe some day!

Kada

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2018, 11:15:34 AM »
Vermiculite works well as its  in organic, holds water and  is easy to adjust how much water is in it.  The difference is when  things are shipped without being super clean. When  the seeds have some fruit pulp on them, or sugar and nutrients, fungus spores germinate and .the  Vermiculite is the perfect consistency for fungal growth and has nothing in it  to prevent fungus, hence its use sometimes in mushroom culturing. The moss although can mold,  it does prevent  fungus quite well even.if there are some sugars kicking it around.

One thing to keep in mind.  Vermiculite is a rock.  Sphagnum moss  is a plant and  some countries quarantine/customers type agencies will not allow it in without your  regular plant paperwork such as phytosanitary certificate, import permissions etc.  So in  that regard Vermiculite by as an advantage.   Moisten it first, its bad to breathe in the dust.

Kada

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #8 on: Today at 04:54:20 AM »
As it happens in cleaning some Pakistan and rambutan seed now. Here is a pic.  They will be sent in sphagnum moss.  Generally there is no mold so long as not too wet.




fruitlovers

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Re: Difficulties with pulasan
« Reply #9 on: Today at 06:33:29 AM »
Vermiculite works well as its  in organic, holds water and  is easy to adjust how much water is in it.  The difference is when  things are shipped without being super clean. When  the seeds have some fruit pulp on them, or sugar and nutrients, fungus spores germinate and .the  Vermiculite is the perfect consistency for fungal growth and has nothing in it  to prevent fungus, hence its use sometimes in mushroom culturing. The moss although can mold,  it does prevent  fungus quite well even.if there are some sugars kicking it around.

One thing to keep in mind.  Vermiculite is a rock. Sphagnum moss  is a plant and  some countries quarantine/customers type agencies will not allow it in without your  regular plant paperwork such as phytosanitary certificate, import permissions etc.  So in  that regard Vermiculite by as an advantage.   Moisten it first, its bad to breathe in the dust.
As far as i know, the only countries that do not allow sphagnum moss in the medium, even with a phyto, are Australia, New Zealand, and Canada.
Oscar

 

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