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Author Topic: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a  (Read 353 times)

Vlad

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How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« on: October 17, 2018, 01:25:25 PM »
I have a two year old P. trifoliata started as a cutting that I would like to plant outdoors. Any tips for ensuring its survival?

Laaz

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2018, 02:35:29 PM »
Wait until spring.

Vlad

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2018, 03:31:39 PM »
Laaz, do you mean it will not withstand the cold this winter but will the next or that it will never survive the winters in zone 6a?

Laaz

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2018, 03:54:22 PM »
It will need a season to get it's roots established. I've heard there are specimens in Boston, so you may have a chance with proper sighting.

Florian

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2018, 04:27:21 PM »
Zone 6a sounds like the extreme limit for Poncirus. Having mature wood would certainly help its survival. Anyway it should be interesting to see if it is as hardy as they say.

Citradia

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2018, 07:56:39 PM »
Like Laaz said, plant it in spring to give it a head start. I tried leaving some seedling flying dragons in pots outside over winter, and they froze to death. My specimens that were planted in ground from same generation overwintering just fine with no protection. Also, I planted some seedling poncirus trifoliata that were only 12 inches high one spring and they did fine the following winter. Poncirus in ground here is just as hardy as a crabapple tree. Most winters my PTís still have some leaves at top of tree when spring comes.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2018, 01:13:01 PM by Citradia »

Vlad

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2018, 09:09:55 PM »
Are non flying dragon P. trifoliata just as hardy as flying dragon?

Florian

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2018, 04:08:10 AM »
Yes.

Walt

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2018, 01:54:01 PM »
I'm in northern zone 6.  I'm also in a rather dry area, central Kansas. 
Under my conditions, P. trifoliata is completely winter hardy if it doesn't dry out.  I wouldn't even try fall planting trifoliata.  I don't even fall plant apples and plums as they would also need water their first winter.  If spring planted, the same trees will only need winter irrigation in a very dry area like mine.  The next winter they will likely have their roots down enough to find water.
But last spring, I had to transplant some 4 year old trifoliates.  They had an extremely shallow root system.  I think drying out of seedlings is more likely to kill them than the cold.
But it doesn't really matter what it is that kills them.  Spring plant like Laaz said.

Florian.  P. trifoliata does OK in Nebraska, zone 5.  I don't know if those are in sheltered locations or anything else about them.

Florian

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2018, 07:58:36 AM »

Florian.  P. trifoliata does OK in Nebraska, zone 5.  I don't know if those are in sheltered locations or anything else about them.

Thanks for the info, Walt. Where I live, temperatures rarely drop below -10/-12C. I was not sure the -20 or even -30C one can read on some pages were really true.

Walt

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Re: How should I plant P. trifoliata outdoors in zone 6a
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2018, 03:28:09 PM »
My P. trifoliata are in a field fully exposed to wind and everything.  They have taken -5 F every winter for 5 winters.  I don't have my calculater along, but that is colder than -10 C.  I don't think cold will be a problem with established plants.
My way has been to buy fruit at Hong's Landscape in Wichita, Kansas.  His 2 trees are over 15 years old, and Mr. Hong doesn't remember where he got them and doesn't have  any information on which variety he has.
So I harvest the seeds and put about 25 in a 1 gallon pot and let them grow inside for their first winter.  By spring, the 4 or 5 month old seedlings are planted where they are to grow and tended like tomato plants until mid August to get as much growth on them as possible.  In mid August, I quit feeding them and reduce water to harden them for winter.  During winter I water a little if it hasn't rained or snowed for a month.  I dought you need to water.
There may be better ways to do it, but this has worked for me.  Once established, they are tough plants.

 

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