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Author Topic: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA  (Read 1704 times)

SoCal2warm

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some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« on: September 23, 2019, 01:52:37 AM »
These are some pictures from jim VH 's place in Vancouver, WA, right across the bridge from Portland, Oregon.



Flying Dragon (A)



Prague Citsuma (B)


close ups of Prague Citsuma

(C)


(D)


(E)


Changsha mandarin (F)


Citrumelo (G)

close up of citrumelo

(H)


( I ) this might be citrangequat


bark damage on base of Yuzu caused by prior cold winter (J)
The tree is about 7 feet tall, thick and healthy, with some green smaller underripe fruit on it.

SoCal2warm

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Re: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2019, 02:46:59 AM »

jim standing in front of the Yuzu for scale (K)

Cold hardy citrus can grow in the Pacific Northwest.


Ilya11

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Re: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2019, 04:17:11 AM »
Nice pictures.
Vancouver has almost the same winter temperatures as Paris region, but two times more rain and cooler summers.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

PlantHoarder

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Re: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2019, 11:10:23 PM »
I spent lots of summers in Vancouver as a kid, so i'm semi-familiar with the area.

I've never heard of a Citsuma, are there any other types of citrus you've had luck with? I've tried growing mandarins that claimed to be cold hardy but they proved to be too delicate. The improved Meyer lemon was also too delicate, it responded quite negatively to cold (not freezing) and steady rainy conditions. I haven't had any impulse to try my luck with it again after that.


jim VH

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Re: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2019, 11:38:37 AM »
I actually haven't tested the Citsuma in my area yet, though the result of other posters suggest it should be quite hardy.

The ones I've tested that survived 8F (-13.3C) and two solid weeks where the temperature never rose above freezing are: Yuzu, Sudachi, Thomasville Citrangequat, Citrumelo and Changsha Tangerine.  All were on Flying Dragon or Poncirus Trifoliate rootstock.  No other rootstock, nor any citrus on it's own roots has survived the ground freezing solid to a depth of 15 inches during the two week freeze.

Satsuma's are only hardy to about 20F in this climate.   I do grow some of the earlier ripening varieties- ones that actually get sweet in our cool summers- but they need winter protection.

A couple comments on the pictures that SoCal has so generously posted,

That is  indeed a Thomasville Citrangequat.

The bark damage is on the Citrangequat, not the Yuzu-the Yuzu is much tougher.

I think that's a Dunstan Citrumelo, based on the shape of the fruit, but it would be nice if some of the more knowledgeable people on this board would confirm (or deny) that thought.

SoCal2warm

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Re: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2020, 02:16:19 PM »
Here's a picture of Jim's Kabosu just taken yesterday.


It's put on some growth since I last saw it. (Which I find somewhat surprising since that was from the end of September to April)
Jim says it looks like it has the same level of hardiness as Yuzu and Sudachi. He says he was able to try one fruit from the tree. It got very big and orange, and developed a sweet taste.


Jim's Ichang Lemon (not Ichang papeda, to avoid confusion) tree is also doing surprisingly well, very big (over 6 feet), although Jim says it has never flowered or fruited.
(I suggested to him to give it a few more years, as some varieties can be much less precocious than others, and that it might fruit when it gets a little bit bigger or older)

Jim's Early St. Ann Satsuma (big tree) survived through the winter just fine, going unprotected for the first time, and Jim reckons it would have likely produced fruit this year. But we'll never know because Jim tore the tree out in early Spring. He got tired of protecting it, and says this winter was a relatively mild one for him, and it had become overgrown and was taking up too much space in the spot where it was. The last I saw of it, the tree was just a little over 4 feet wide, maybe 5 feet high, looked pretty old.

Jim also told me his huge Yuzu tree bush produced 50 pounds of fruit one year (either this winter, or the year before), and some guy who had a local brewery came and collected them because he was going to make fresh Yuzu flavored beer.

The very outer layer of the big Yuzu bush has yellow leaves, especially on the South-facing side, but the leaves inside the bush all look very green and healthy. Apparently the outer layer of the bush acted to provide insulation. The South-side is facing the street and that is where it is most exposed to winds.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2020, 03:09:16 PM by SoCal2warm »

jim VH

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Re: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2020, 10:05:33 AM »
A couple minor clarifications to what SoCal posted

The Kabosu fruit is about the size and color of the fruit of the  Yuzu, which in turn is yellow and roughly Satsuma size .  The flavor is much better, and has far fewer seeds than the Yuzu.  It's sweetness is roughly the level of a grapefruit, which means you can eat it out of hand if you're sufficiently demented, though, like a grapefruit, a bit of sugar helps.

I replaced the Early St Anne -which was on a citrange rootstock-with one I grafted onto a Flying Dragon rootstock, mainly because it was outgrowing it's shelter; it was getting quite large.  I will continue to protect it- the fruit is quite good.  The FD rootstock also has the advantage of earlier ripening, so probably more sweetness.
The old one would almost certainly have bloomed- the winter low was only 25F (-3.9C) and it showed no damage.  I've exposed Satsumas to even lower temperatures for short periods with no effect on blooming.

SoCal2warm

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Re: some pictures from Jim's place in Vancouver, WA
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2020, 08:57:03 PM »
Here's the Kabosu, nearly 5 feet tall and loaded with big fruits that do not look too far away from being ripe


The tree appears to have grown very fast and vigorously since I last saw it, and the leaves look very healthy. It has grown much more vigorously than the Sudachi.
The fruits smell like an amazing mix of Satsuma mandarin and Yuzu.

It's grafted onto poncirus.

Here's a close up view of one of the Kabosu fruits


Jim's big Yuzu and Thomasville citrangequat trees barely had any fruits this year, literally only a handful. Might not be surprising, fruit production can be off and on, the trees probably used up most of the energy producing a huge crop of fruit last year.

I did taste one of the Thomasville citrangequats. It was the best Thomasville I had ever tasted. Almost a flavor like lime mixed with Meyer lemon. (Now the flavor was inferior to a lime, but still fairly good) It only had just a little hint of bitterness some might not even notice.

Here's the Thomasville citrangequat cut up

 

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