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Author Topic: HELP! Root Rot  (Read 299 times)

CanadianCitrus

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HELP! Root Rot
« on: October 19, 2018, 07:12:10 PM »
Good day all!

So this summer I was wandering my local Lowe's and happened to see that they had some citrus on sale. It was the middle of the summer and the Key lime plants were going on sale for $7. All of the plants were in rough shape but I felt like I should bring one home and try to revive it. They were all terribly over watered with high pressure garden hoses so some of the root ball was exposed and looking rather dry. When I took it home pulled it out of hits pot to inspect the root system and determined it looked "fine." Fast forward to the last month and about 80% of the leaves have dropped. It has blossomed twice but I pulled all of the flowers after reading that it may help the key lime tree bounce back. Well truth be told it hasn't bounced back and is looking awful. I pulled the tree out of its pot only to find that the bottom roots are brown and somewhat mushy. With my rookie level of experience I have determined that it is in fact root rot. I have a Eureka Lemon and a Navel Orange and they are doing just fine.

The key lime tree is in a 5 gallon plastic pot from Record Buck Farms. I feed it a little bit of 30-10-10 with trace minerals. I also use a moisture meter to ensure I am waiting until it is on the dry side as to not over water.

Is there any way to salvage this lime tree? Should I prune a bunch of limbs and cut off a chunk of the root ball in attempt to save it?

Any advice would be great thanks!

CanadianCitrus

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Re: HELP! Root Rot
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2018, 07:17:59 PM »
Also I have determined that it isnt winterleaf drop either.

Millet

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Re: HELP! Root Rot
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2018, 08:49:30 PM »
I would remove the tree from the container, and remove all the roots that have rotted. Then replant the tree into a fast draining medium with good aeration.   Since the tree has already dropped much of its leaves, you should not have to cut the top of the plant back.   If you can remove the remaining old medium with causing further damage I would also recommend doing so. The best to you and to your tree.

Citradia

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Re: HELP! Root Rot
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2018, 07:25:33 AM »
Remember that if your plants from Lowe’s die, you can return them for a refund if you have the receipt.

lebmung

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Re: HELP! Root Rot
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2018, 01:49:39 PM »
If the rootball was dry at the shop, then the root rot came after you changed the soil. Infection can come from soil under the pot with rain droplets or when watering.
Millet is right you should change the whole soil. I would wash all the soil until bare root then use a sterile soil.
A use of high nitrogen fertilizer is very bad. Instead use a high phosphorus fertilizer to promote root growth.
Finally the most effective method is use of fungicides as a drench, if you don't mind handling cheemicals.

brian

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Re: HELP! Root Rot
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2018, 02:28:31 AM »
Of the trees I've owned that had severe dieback, about half died and the other half bounced back and are very healthy again.  With new soil your tree may recover in time.  Make sure the container drains well.

Sven_chinotto

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Re: HELP! Root Rot
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2018, 05:02:19 AM »
Fast forward to the last month and about 80% of the leaves have dropped. It has blossomed twice but I pulled all of the flowers after reading that it may help the key lime tree bounce back.

This has happened to me as well before. I've noticed that repotting (at least when I o it) is a stressful experience for them. Even my trifoliate lost most of its leaves after repotting. I once had a lemon tree dying after repotting.
Cheerios!

Sven

lebmung

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Re: HELP! Root Rot
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2018, 05:57:22 AM »
I thick the problem in northern countries with root rot in container can be overcome by using the right rootstock. Most of the rootstock used is PT which is great for outside, clay soil etc.
Inside the house a rootstock with high tolerance to salts and wet soil would be more appropriate. A Papeda citrus would be more resistant as I observed with my plants.

 

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