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Author Topic: Winter Feeding of citrus  (Read 808 times)

Laaz

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Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« Reply #25 on: November 17, 2018, 03:16:06 PM »
I water the trees very well just prior to putting them in the garage. They don't get any water while in the garage & stay moist until I take them back out.

Empoweredandfree

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Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« Reply #26 on: November 17, 2018, 04:34:39 PM »
I avoid anything with EDTA now. I decided just to foliar feed for the winter. I also top dress with a little Dr Earth organic.

Millet

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Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« Reply #27 on: November 17, 2018, 05:16:06 PM »
Not only Dr. Earth, but all organic fertilizers are of not much use when applied to container culture.  This is because organic fertilizers must rely on microorganisms to first break down organic fertilizers, before they become available for the tree's absorption.  Container culture provides none, to very little microorganisms to accomplish this task. Therefore, organic fertilizers are a very poor choice for container grown trees. EDTA, especially in the form of the EDTA-iron chelate, is readily decomposed on exposure to sunlight and yields biodegradable products. Both biodegradation and non biological degradation ensure that EDTA doesn't ppersist
in the environment.     
« Last Edit: November 17, 2018, 08:31:08 PM by Millet »

lebmung

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Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« Reply #28 on: November 17, 2018, 06:28:54 PM »
I agree with Millet. Organic fertilizers are good during the hot season, when you can add microorganisms from compost tea, vermicompost or supplements. Liquid humic acid and humus works well. But here there is another catch, these can also contain bad microorganisms in a low amount not harmful to plants. Still when the plant is stressed or soil is overwatered and cold these will take over. So instance Phytophthora.
If one applies in the winter, the fertilizer won't decompose so fast with the help of beneficial microorganisms. In fact anaerobic bacteria, mold and algae will take over which could in turn lead to root rot, and the soil becomes mushy. for those who don't believe apply organic fertilizer pellets on top of the soil, and put it in greenhouse at 10C or 50F and 90%RH, a white crust of mold will start to grow on top.

snek

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Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« Reply #29 on: November 18, 2018, 08:33:32 AM »
"Therefore, organic fertilizers are a very poor choice for container grown trees."

Really?
I grow citrus only in containers and I use the most organic fertilizers.
More precisely (because I'm often asked): In the spring I use Osmocote 6M or 8M (about 1/6 according to the instructions) and the rest is only organic. Pelletized manure (cattle, sheep, horse, hen - I alternate it). Once or twice a year to add toppings liquid humus. That is all.
The most important thing is keeping the optimum humidity mode in the container !

Millet

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Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« Reply #30 on: November 18, 2018, 03:42:50 PM »
Well snek, your are adding microorganisms a plenty via the cattle, sheep, horse and hen mature, plus the liquid humus.  It is the microorganisms in these products what would make an organic fertilizer available.   Also, you are using the conventional fertilizer Osmocote. This is what Lebmung's and my  posts explained above.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2018, 04:38:59 PM by Millet »

Empoweredandfree

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Re: Winter Feeding of citrus
« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2018, 02:32:26 PM »
Not only Dr. Earth, but all organic fertilizers are of not much use when applied to container culture.  This is because organic fertilizers must rely on microorganisms to first break down organic fertilizers, before they become available for the tree's absorption.  Container culture provides none, to very little microorganisms to accomplish this task. Therefore, organic fertilizers are a very poor choice for container grown trees. EDTA, especially in the form of the EDTA-iron chelate, is readily decomposed on exposure to sunlight and yields biodegradable products. Both biodegradation and non biological degradation ensure that EDTA doesn't ppersist
in the environment.   

 In the summertime it appears organics work just fine compared with their synthetic counterparts so I'm assuming there is some microorganism activity?

 Thats good to hear about EDTA as everything I've read say its not easy to degrade and toxic to microorganisms! I'd love to read something countering this if you could provide me some reading material..?

 

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