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Author Topic: Camu Camu forest (Myrciaria dubia)  (Read 2598 times)

greg794855

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Re: Camu Camu forest (Myrciaria dubia)
« Reply #50 on: November 23, 2018, 01:10:27 PM »
:D Legit though, I didn't mean to make you think you aren't welcome. I just think the way you've said some things seems intentionally provocative. I mean what kind of response do you really expect when you post, "Hey look at these amazing plants I grew using secret methods which I won't reveal, but which are going to change the world of tropical fruit growing" on a tropical fruit forum? I think it's natural that some people will take offense.

FWIW, Finca La Isla has a big permaculture project in Costa Rica and has been doing this for thirty years. He seems like a really nice guy. Here's a tour of his place: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kzk1hoctyxE

I get what youíre saying.

I saw Camu Camu plants on amazon and eBay. So I thought a bunch of people were growing it. Obviously thatís not the case.

Only couple of things I wonít disclose, one is the medium. Which once he was told no got bent over and well itís all on the thread.

I saw his website, hence my last post. He gets paid for selling trees, fruit, consultations etc. yet is somehow entitled to free information to profit off of.

Itís cool though, Iíll just post updates and answer questions if I can.
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greg794855

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Re: Camu Camu forest (Myrciaria dubia)
« Reply #51 on: November 26, 2018, 12:38:49 PM »
A couple of observations we noted this week:

The age of the camu camu alone does not determine when the fruiting will begin as some research suggests.

The diameter of the trunk must be at least 2cm or so and the plant at least 3 years old, once it hits this mark it should fruit. It is true to date when these conditions are present. We are still looking into seasonal production as opposed to age.

There are a couple of exceptions to these rules but for the most part this is what we have observed.

Once fruiting starts there is a lot of staggered blooms through various stages. This is good due to the fruit providing various levels of nutrients at various times in days after anthesis.





« Last Edit: November 26, 2018, 12:44:39 PM by greg794855 »
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greg794855

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Re: Camu Camu forest (Myrciaria dubia)
« Reply #52 on: December 26, 2018, 04:19:13 PM »



Still producing berries in late December. In the greenhouse with no extra heat.
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greg794855

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Re: Camu Camu forest (Myrciaria dubia)
« Reply #53 on: April 11, 2019, 10:32:21 AM »
Our first year of fruit. We still can not determine the fruiting cycle yet. Hundreds of pounds of fruit just after a mild Louisiana winter this year. Some frost damage but not much, especially compared to last year when we hit below 20F.





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Alejandro45

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Re: Camu Camu forest (Myrciaria dubia)
« Reply #54 on: April 12, 2019, 02:49:42 PM »
Great stuff! Here is a snippet from Morton's book
"This species occurs abundantly wild in swamps along rivers and lakes, especially the Rio MazŠn near Iquitos, Peru, and in Amazonian Brazil and Venezuela, often with the base of the trunk under water, and, during the rainy season, the lower branches are also submerged for long periods."

"Seeds were brought to Florida by William F. Whitman in 1964, and plants were raised, he says, in an "acid hammock sand soil" and regularly watered. One plant bore rather heavily in 1972, mainly in late summer with a few scattered fruits the following winter. One plant was 12 ft (3.65 m) tall and equally broad in 1974. In Brazil, the fruit is borne mainly from November to March."

Combined with your passion. I think you are in a great part of the USA to grow them. Tons of acidic rain or straight up swamp water to use for irrigation and outrageously high humidity. I would try planting a few dozen seeds in the Bayou and see if they make it through the winter!

greg794855

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Re: Camu Camu forest (Myrciaria dubia)
« Reply #55 on: April 15, 2019, 09:11:19 AM »
Great stuff! Here is a snippet from Morton's book
"This species occurs abundantly wild in swamps along rivers and lakes, especially the Rio MazŠn near Iquitos, Peru, and in Amazonian Brazil and Venezuela, often with the base of the trunk under water, and, during the rainy season, the lower branches are also submerged for long periods."

"Seeds were brought to Florida by William F. Whitman in 1964, and plants were raised, he says, in an "acid hammock sand soil" and regularly watered. One plant bore rather heavily in 1972, mainly in late summer with a few scattered fruits the following winter. One plant was 12 ft (3.65 m) tall and equally broad in 1974. In Brazil, the fruit is borne mainly from November to March."

Combined with your passion. I think you are in a great part of the USA to grow them. Tons of acidic rain or straight up swamp water to use for irrigation and outrageously high humidity. I would try planting a few dozen seeds in the Bayou and see if they make it through the winter!

So the fruit over the winter might have just been the maturity crop and possibly the first scatter and hopefully we get a bumper over the summer...interesting for sure. We are still working on thresholds in various settings.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2019, 09:22:24 AM by greg794855 »
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