Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Ichanquat 6-7-2  (Read 209 times)

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 360
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Ichanquat 6-7-2
« on: November 19, 2018, 05:25:15 PM »
This year the fruits are much larger than before



and the tree (more than 7 m high) soon will be a candidate for the tallest citrus in Europe



Best regards,
                       Ilya

Citradia

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 580
    • USA/NC/Old Fort/6B
    • View Profile
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2018, 06:27:34 PM »
Congratulations, Ilya! I haven’t heard of this variety. Is it one that you hybridized yourself? Is the fruit good? Do you eat it like a kumquat, peel and all?

SoCal2warm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 618
    • zone 10 and zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2018, 07:45:23 PM »
Very impressive for such a large citrus to be growing outside in the Paris region. Especially one that does not have trifoliate in its ancestry.
It must have inherited desirable hardiness traits from both its parents. I don't think ichangensis by itself would have done as well out there.

Did you protect the tree while it was young?

mikkel

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
    • Lueneburg, Germany Zone 7
    • View Profile
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2018, 01:52:52 AM »
What a nice tree!

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 360
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2018, 04:04:46 AM »
Congratulations, Ilya! I haven’t heard of this variety. Is it one that you hybridized yourself? Is the fruit good? Do you eat it like a kumquat, peel and all?
Thank you,
This variety was bred in Florida, B.Voss from Hamburg got several seeds of it, they were probably all zygotic and one of the seedlings has been chosen by him and propagated by grafting. I got this plant from Bernhard in 2002, it has been in the ground since 2003, unprotected but in a rather favorable position close to the Western wall of the house. Never was damaged ( the lowest temperature was -16.5C). As far as I know this grafted seedling started to flower for the first time   in my garden in 2010.

It has several waves of flowering, fruits are ripe in  around 3 months. I suspect this seedling is triploid since it contains few seeds (one in approximately 4  fruits). In a description of original 6-7-2 it was full of seeds. Fruits have variable amount of juice when fully ripe. Some are empty, while majority have juice that is less acid than that of Nagami. Albedo is sweet, the outer skin is bitter with pine and feijoa notes. If you like Bitter orange jam you can eat these fruits like kumquats, with years I became addicted to them. ;D 
« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 04:06:45 AM by Ilya11 »
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Zitrusgaertner

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 71
    • Vienna, Austria, European Union 7b
    • View Profile
    • www.agrumi.at
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2018, 04:28:20 AM »
mine died last year because of rind-cracks. It was not well established (weak root system) I have bought a plant from Adavo. Hope it is the same specimen.

Jloup27

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 6
    • France - Normandy - Bernay (27) - Zone 8a (-10 ŕ -12°C) -15°C February 2012
    • View Profile
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2018, 08:02:19 AM »
Having seen this tree in real life is very impressive and beautiful.
The Bitter orange jam looks like him and is good.

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 360
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2018, 08:38:09 AM »
mine died last year because of rind-cracks. It was not well established (weak root system) I have bought a plant from Adavo. Hope it is the same specimen.

They have a picture of my tree on their site :D
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Ilya11

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 360
    • France, Paris region, Vaux le Penil, middle of Northern z8
    • View Profile
Re: Ichanquat 6-7-2
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2018, 08:45:47 AM »
Very impressive for such a large citrus to be growing outside in the Paris region. Especially one that does not have trifoliate in its ancestry.
It must have inherited desirable hardiness traits from both its parents. I don't think ichangensis by itself would have done as well out there.

Did you protect the tree while it was young?
No, it was never protected.
Ichangensis by itself is not particularly hardy under conditions when daytime winter temperatures are rising above 10°C. It is the first to start vegetation and can be killed by sudden frost return.

Best regards,
                       Ilya

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers