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Author Topic: Anonas  (Read 2226 times)

spaugh

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Anonas
« on: November 19, 2018, 06:57:04 PM »
Got to try some llama, atemoya, sugar apple?, and cherimoya.  Have only had cherimoyas in the past.

The others were not even in the same league as the cherimoya.  Was going to grow some llamas and atemoyas but not now.


« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 08:16:08 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2018, 08:42:39 PM »
Brad, I would have to agree that Cherimoya was the best tasting out of the group. I was really hoping the Illama would be a good tasting fruit but was very disappointed in the flavor, texture and seediness.

Simon

JF

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2018, 09:31:19 PM »
Everyone has their preferences and opinions but I agree with you guys 100%. There is no anonas that can compete with an Pierce, Orton, El Bumpo and some other top tiers. Simon and I have been to tastings that have confirm this however there are ppl in this forum that prefer the former including some that have been with us in those tasting. I’ve had many saramoyos and custard apples that are as good as some cherimoyas

Guanabanus

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2018, 09:28:51 AM »
The flavor and texture of ilamas can vary drastically on the same tree, from one year to the next--- from wonderful to worthless.  The biggest negative factor seems to be an early start of the summer rainy season.
Har

Johnny Redland

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2018, 11:25:13 AM »
This is why I'm a big fan of the custard apple, because the raspberry flavor and creamy texture of the San Pablo or Fernandez varieties is so different from any other Atemoyas.  Trying to compare typical Atemoyas like those pictured above with Cherimoya is like trying to compare a Tommy Atkins Mango to a Malika Mango or Sweettart mango.  They are apples and oranges even though they are in the same family.

JF

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2018, 11:35:32 AM »
The flavor and texture of ilamas can vary drastically on the same tree, from one year to the next--- from wonderful to worthless.  The biggest negative factor seems to be an early start of the summer rainy season.

They are affected by rain and sudden drop in night temps here in SoCal. Simon and I went to a cherimoya tasting a few years ago in Irvine research & extension center and every cherimoya tasted like pig slop , if I would’ve decided not to plant a cherimoya based that experience it would’ve been a terrible choice. Here is what Kyle said about anona rosada a few days ago in my instagram: the king of anonas!




different strokes for different folks....

JF

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2018, 11:46:11 AM »
This is why I'm a big fan of the custard apple, because the raspberry flavor and creamy texture of the San Pablo or Fernandez varieties is so different from any other Atemoyas.  Trying to compare typical Atemoyas like those pictured above with Cherimoya is like trying to compare a Tommy Atkins Mango to a Malika Mango or Sweettart mango.  They are apples and oranges even though they are in the same family.

Very good point Johnny the texture and flavor is so different among  species of annonas. Red flesh custard apples are as enjoyable as any anona I’ve taste. I prefer Tizimin and Uxmal reds. SoCal folks are spoiled with regards in able to grow cherimoyas and other annobas they should take advantage

Johnny Redland

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2018, 03:54:11 PM »
This is why I'm a big fan of the custard apple, because the raspberry flavor and creamy texture of the San Pablo or Fernandez varieties is so different from any other Atemoyas.  Trying to compare typical Atemoyas like those pictured above with Cherimoya is like trying to compare a Tommy Atkins Mango to a Malika Mango or Sweettart mango.  They are apples and oranges even though they are in the same family.

Very good point Johnny the texture and flavor is so different among  species of annonas. Red flesh custard apples are as enjoyable as any anona I’ve taste. I prefer Tizimin and Uxmal reds. SoCal folks are spoiled with regards in able to grow cherimoyas and other annobas they should take advantage

Tizimin and Uxmal huh? I've never had the pleasure of trying either.  I'll keep my eye out for those trees, fruits, or bud wood. 

Guanabanus

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2018, 07:49:39 PM »
I also very much like Annona reticulata, Custard-Apple.  Haven't heard of the Uxmal and Tizimin varieties--- sounds interesting.
Har

spaugh

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2018, 08:54:51 PM »
Heres a knight cherimoya off my 1 year old tree.  Small seeds, high flesh ratio, 30 brix...  This is one of the best cherimoyas Ive had.







Brad Spaugh

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2018, 09:33:28 PM »
Nice looking fruit Brad. The wind and dry weather have been knocking fruit off my trees the last couple weeks. These were knocked off yesterday or the day before


I just found these on the ground right now



Simon

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2018, 11:40:37 PM »
Nice find Simon ...easily over $50 worth of fruit at today’s market prices.
Warren

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2018, 02:57:13 AM »
Are you guys hand pollinating to get those yields or letting entropy do its thing?

simon_grow

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2018, 08:12:22 AM »
I hand pollinate. My fruitvis pretty seedy due to my hand pollination and I tend not to thin enough so my fruit size is smaller.

Simon

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2018, 10:45:54 AM »
Are you guys hand pollinating to get those yields or letting entropy do its thing?

Hand pollinating is the only way to go if you want to increase production but as Simon says thinning is a must to insure the fruits size up

Bush2Beach

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2018, 01:23:33 PM »
With multiple cultivars in one yard I dont find the need to hand pollinate. Many tree’s that have been in the ground 1-2 years are over fruiting themselves with 20+ fruit holding on a 5’ x 5 ‘ tree. I do have to thin for them to size up properly but i have not pollinated as of yet. Trying to get some fruit set on any other Annona grafted to Cherimoya, it appears hand pollination is necessary.

JF

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2018, 07:33:07 PM »
The information above is incorrect. I have an anona forest in all 5 of my yards and if I relied on the trees to set on their own I couldnt feed my family.
















spaugh

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2018, 09:20:26 PM »
With multiple cultivars in one yard I dont find the need to hand pollinate. Many tree’s that have been in the ground 1-2 years are over fruiting themselves with 20+ fruit holding on a 5’ x 5 ‘ tree. I do have to thin for them to size up properly but i have not pollinated as of yet. Trying to get some fruit set on any other Annona grafted to Cherimoya, it appears hand pollination is necessary.

Post pictures
Brad Spaugh

Bush2Beach

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2018, 11:36:15 AM »
Go nyam some fresh noni  fruit. I have zero incentive to post incorrect or misleading information.
I have give or take 30 + grafted cherimoya in the ground i grew from seed , grafted and planted and thats what is happening so chuck off. Your going to tell me I hand pollinate when I don’t? That’s weird ,  plenty of folks on the forum have seen my set up and grown Cherimoya tree’s from fruit that was grown in my yard .without hand pollination. The untrue statement is your family is not fed from Annona’s in your yard’s but by Von’s, Chicken, Corn , Squash maybe and the diet is augmented with Annona . So basically, do not tell me what i am experiencing , that you have not seen , is incorrect. That is a burro move.
The information above is incorrect. I have an anona forest in all 5 of my yards and if I relied on the trees to set on their own I couldnt feed my family.
















Bush2Beach

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2018, 11:47:41 AM »
From my most recent planting , most of these Annona were planted from 15-25 gallon pots this Spring. I did not have the success with fruit set until multiple cultivars are in flower at the same time. I am still getting flowers and fruit set. I am not aware of any other Cherimoya planting’s in Santa Cruz area. One friend I gave a 15 gallon Behl tree to hand pollinates religiouslly and his fruits are bigger but it could be the variety and fact he has 1 of the most ideal growing conditions i have seen here.


With multiple cultivars in one yard I dont find the need to hand pollinate. Many tree’s that have been in the ground 1-2 years are over fruiting themselves with 20+ fruit holding on a 5’ x 5 ‘ tree. I do have to thin for them to size up properly but i have not pollinated as of yet. Trying to get some fruit set on any other Annona grafted to Cherimoya, it appears hand pollination is necessary.

Post pictures



Always more fruit hiding under the foliage than you can see in the photo’s.










Setting fruit since around July and still setting

« Last Edit: November 22, 2018, 11:49:25 AM by Bush2Beach »

simon_grow

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2018, 11:53:05 AM »
I’ve seen Annonas including Cherimoyas set fruit on their own but it’s usually larger trees like the ones at Exotica. For consistent harvests of nicely shaped fruit, you need to hand pollinate for good harvests.

For us with larger Cherimoya trees, I expect between 70-100 Fruit year in and year out. For really large trees, you can expect a lot more. I already harvested a bunch of fruit from my tree and there is still quite a few hanging. This is accomplished by hand pollination.
Here’s some fruit that recently fell off

And still quite a bit hanging on the tree


Simon

Bush2Beach

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #21 on: November 22, 2018, 12:38:01 PM »
Simon, What is the larger tree size , capable of holding 70-100 fruits , trunk caliper near the base?
I recall a handout from Nino at the CCA conference that stated he hand pollinated earlier and earlier each year and this correspondended with bigger harvests. I’ve also read on TFF about hand pollinating contributing to more seediness. There is give and take with everything. I would like to be on it with handpollinsting  and I would like all the varieties to fruit, many pots on the fire of course and I would be more likely to without the good fruit set.
The “Dream” , “Lisa” and A. Globiflora continue to flower well for a third year but no hand pollination so no fruit set. I have observed smaller amounts of fruit set and no fruit set on certain Cherimoya cultivar ( Pierce, Inca Red) , and then others overset themselves prolifically without the hand pollination (HoneyHART, Licia, Fino de Jete) , fascinating.

Of note regarding Exotica was a singular Cherimoya I found holding ripe in August, on one of the huge tree’s at the back of the lot next door. Never pruned , those monsters must be 30 foot by 30 foot easy.

simon_grow

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #22 on: November 22, 2018, 01:21:47 PM »
My Cherimoya tree in the back is approximately 10 feet tall and 10 feet wide. The trunk measured 1 foot above ground level is approximately 4 inches in diameter. I would guesstimate it had about 80-90 fruit on it and it had slightly more fruit last year.

My tree is still very young, it’s been in the ground about 6 years or so. A full grown Cherimoya tree is humongous and will produce much more fruit. My larger tree at my old house would produce around 200 fruit.

Here’s a picture of the trunk of my tree.

Simon

marklee

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #23 on: November 24, 2018, 05:12:12 PM »
Some various annonas ripening, a lot of the atemoyas were pollinated with custard apple pollen.















Guanabanus

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Re: Anonas
« Reply #24 on: November 24, 2018, 05:57:15 PM »
Several factors infuence flowering, fruit set, and fruit set retention:  mineral nutrition(especially Calcium, Boron, and Zinc), soil moisture, air humidity, warmth, presence of pollinators (Nitidulid mini beetles, not bees or flies), and lots of sunlight.

So from one yard to the next, persons can have 100% different results, without anyone's being a liar.
Har

 

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