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Author Topic: Neonic migration  (Read 184 times)

Empoweredandfree

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Neonic migration
« on: December 29, 2018, 02:07:38 PM »
So I have purchased a bunch of citrus trees the past few years being fully aware of the fact they were treated with systemic poisons (neonics). I know they stay in the tree for a few years but how much of the neonics migrate from the potting soil into ground and water supplies after a heavy rain? My pet ducks were drinking from a puddle of water next to the treated citrus tree and even ate a few leaves off the tree so made me wonder again about how much leaching occurs....

TooFarNorth

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Re: Neonic migration
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2018, 04:28:12 PM »
Ok, first of all, I am no expert, but I do not think you have anything to worry about if your duck drank the "water" or ate the leaves if at least six months has passed since treatment.  I use imidacloprid on my young non bearing trees, and in less than six months, the citrus leaf miners start damaging the leaves again.  Also many plants, even some vegetables and teas contain small amounts of nicotine, so I would think their systems would be adapted to it somewhat. After heavy rains, I would think it would be diluted to a safe level. Maybe someone more knowledgeable than I can chime in.


TFN

Empoweredandfree

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Re: Neonic migration
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2018, 03:29:31 PM »
From everything I've read, neonics are in the plant for a year and sometimes two, that I understood when I purchased them, but my concern is the pesticide contaminating ground soil....

Zitrusgaertner

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Re: Neonic migration
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2019, 02:25:41 PM »
Depends on the type or Neonicotinoid, but Clothianidin for example can stay up to 5 years in ground. It is very poisonous to honeybees and other pollinators. No good idea to use it.

Empoweredandfree

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Re: Neonic migration
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2019, 03:56:47 PM »
I don't use them but the citrus trees shipped up North or anywhere in the country need to be treated to before leaving Florida in this case. I tried to contact the original distributor but no luck on finding out the poison used...

 

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