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Author Topic: Pulasan trees flowering . . .  (Read 728 times)

Doug

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Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« on: January 06, 2019, 10:12:02 AM »

I was surprised this weekend to see that five of my seven pulasan trees are heavily flowering. I'm surprised because the trees have been grown from seed and have only been in the ground for five years. I sort of was expecting my GRAFTED rambutan trees to flower before the pulasan trees because they are a year older. Perhaps rambutans flower later? I hope (please, God!) one of the pulasans is a male. Anyway, it was a nice surprise! BTW, I planted two pulasans close together in one hole. The trunks are fused now and the "tree" is the largest of the lot. It's a beautiful healthy tree.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2019, 11:23:56 AM »
Hi Doug,
Congratulations, nice to have the pulusan flowering.  We’ve just had the driest December anyone can remember, and perhaps the driest month of a wet year.  Hope that brings on lots of flowering!
Grafted/layered rambutan out to flower in 2-3 years, quien sabe?
Saludos,
Peter

HIfarm

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2019, 11:32:56 AM »
Congratulations, Doug.  I hope you have a pair in there, you'll have to let us know how it turns out.  I'm happy to hear that two trees in one hole appears to be working out.  I've done the same thing with a number of different species (based on forum members' advice) and none of mine have fused yet but some are approaching this.

John

Reafs

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2019, 10:01:11 AM »

I was surprised this weekend to see that five of my seven pulasan trees are heavily flowering. I'm surprised because the trees have been grown from seed and have only been in the ground for five years. I sort of was expecting my GRAFTED rambutan trees to flower before the pulasan trees because they are a year older. Perhaps rambutans flower later? I hope (please, God!) one of the pulasans is a male. Anyway, it was a nice surprise! BTW, I planted two pulasans close together in one hole. The trunks are fused now and the "tree" is the largest of the lot. It's a beautiful healthy tree.

Congrats, do not forget to share some pictures
Yohann

DurianLover

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2019, 11:31:08 AM »
My seedling pulasan flowered for the first time but nothing happened. What does that mean? Could be a male tree or do they set fruit on repeated attempts?

Doug

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2019, 12:26:35 PM »
Of my five Pulisans that flowered recently, it turns out two are males, judging by the flower photos I found on the net. (The flowers are distinctly different from each other!) Of the females only the largest tree managed to set fruit . . . and, it's loaded! I'm very happy.

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2019, 12:31:22 PM »
Congrats!

I'm intrigued by this trunk fusion business.
I've heard of 2 trees in one hole but hadn't thought about them fusing.

Are there particular conditions needed to make this happen? Is it desirable and/or does it have advantages over separate trees in very, very close proximity?


NateTheGreat

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2019, 05:33:25 PM »
Congrats!

I'm intrigued by this trunk fusion business.
I've heard of 2 trees in one hole but hadn't thought about them fusing.

Are there particular conditions needed to make this happen? Is it desirable and/or does it have advantages over separate trees in very, very close proximity?

Not a pulasan, but I found this E. involucrata seedling(s) the other day. I'm guessing it was polyembronic and fused.


fruitlovers

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2019, 05:11:27 AM »
Of my five Pulisans that flowered recently, it turns out two are males, judging by the flower photos I found on the net. (The flowers are distinctly different from each other!) Of the females only the largest tree managed to set fruit . . . and, it's loaded! I'm very happy.
Pulasans, like rambutans, have male, female, and hermaphrodite trees. Usually rambutans flower and fruit faster than pulasan, especially grafted rambutans.
Oscar

Finca La Isla

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2019, 01:21:56 PM »
What’s interesting to me is that I used to think that seedling females would need a male around to set fruit unless they were hermaphrodite.  In rambutans I have never seen a female tree that wouldn’t produce on its own.  I’ve also bagged flowers before they opened and they set fruit.  The difference in the flowers is very obvious.
With pulusan I have an area with 3 trees that all produce fruit.  An adjacent male tree was eliminated long ago.  I sell airlayers from those trees and a client got production of flat fruit with little or no pulp.  Is that because the tree needs cross pollination?  Another clone of that tree on another part of my farm is isolated from other pulusans and produces good fruit.  The separation from the others is almost 200m with a section of rainforest corridor in between making cross pollination unlikely though not impossible.

fruitlovers

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Re: Pulasan trees flowering . . .
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2019, 05:35:06 PM »
What’s interesting to me is that I used to think that seedling females would need a male around to set fruit unless they were hermaphrodite.  In rambutans I have never seen a female tree that wouldn’t produce on its own.  I’ve also bagged flowers before they opened and they set fruit.  The difference in the flowers is very obvious.
With pulusan I have an area with 3 trees that all produce fruit.  An adjacent male tree was eliminated long ago.  I sell airlayers from those trees and a client got production of flat fruit with little or no pulp.  Is that because the tree needs cross pollination?  Another clone of that tree on another part of my farm is isolated from other pulusans and produces good fruit.  The separation from the others is almost 200m with a section of rainforest corridor in between making cross pollination unlikely though not impossible.
Female trees can have some hermaphrodite flowers. But removing all males i think is a mistake, as you will get more pollination = more fruits and less flattened fruits with nothing inside. Male flowers have a ot more pollen than occasional hermaphrodite flowers. Those flattened fruits mean they did not get any pollen. It's good to have some male trees planted for that reason. But the ratio, male to female can be quite low in an orchard and still see improvement.
Oscar

 

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