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Author Topic: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?  (Read 786 times)

Weboh

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Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« on: January 12, 2019, 09:40:39 PM »
I want to get more fruiting plants, but most of my yard is in the shade, and most of the shade can't be helped (neighbors' trees, houses, etc). I know most plants that flower and fruit basically require full sunóor more than my yard gets, anyway.

Are there any plants that would produce a decent amount of fruit in mostly shade in zone 10a?

ajeshcool47

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2019, 09:51:34 PM »
almost all garcinias and annonas prefer shade...

pineislander

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2019, 10:00:56 PM »
Maybe not a large amount of fruit and the fruit is more of a novelty, but Monstera deliciosa/Ceriman grows in heavy to dappled shade.
Plants are available at garden centers I got a $10 pot at Home Depot which divided up into 10 new plants. They may take a year or more to mature and a year to ripen after flowering.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRL6xzDmiJY

Weboh

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2019, 12:17:10 PM »
That plant looks really interesting! Have you grown it before? Some places say to grow it as a vine and others as shrub. (https://www.lowes.com/pd/Split-leaf-Philodendron-LTL0049/3930145) (https://sowexotic.com/products/monstera-deliciosa) I have seen a couple places in my neighborhood what looks like that vine growing on trees. They don't look very healthy though, and definitely don't have fruit:



Or is the vine variety a different one? I've noticed most of the vine versions of that plant seem to be variegated. Do variegated plants just not have the energy to spare to make fruit?


skhan

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2019, 03:15:05 PM »
there are a few older post on this topic.
Look up shade tolerance

Here is a link i had bookmarked
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=3494.0
Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2019

pineislander

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2019, 06:38:49 PM »
Your photos are not Monstera, but the links are correct. As with all plants good care water and fertility will grow and fruit better. I have 35 Monstera and another 30 getting ready for planting it is making a good under story plant to occupy the shaded zone under dense fruit trees. Mine are 1 year old but neighboring vines have fruited in 2 years with 12 fruit each. There is an adolescent phase where the leaves are not split. The best material for propagation is an older vine. Chop the 1-1/2 inch diameter vine into 2 node segments and bury them 1/2 covered. If kept moist & warm the pieces will strike strong new vines fro dormant buds. It might take 6 months to get to good size. Last month a neighbor cut down and threw away 10- 15 feet of vine which would have made so many new plants I was sad to have missed the score.

Coach62

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2019, 11:56:50 PM »
Maybe not a large amount of fruit and the fruit is more of a novelty, but Monstera deliciosa/Ceriman grows in heavy to dappled shade.
Plants are available at garden centers I got a $10 pot at Home Depot which divided up into 10 new plants. They may take a year or more to mature and a year to ripen after flowering.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRL6xzDmiJY

Thatís what I was going to suggest. Donít know if Iíd put them in a novelty category, have you eaten one?  I mean I get why you might, but OMG one of the best tasting fruits Iíve ever eaten.
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Stop New Yorking my Florida!

Bruce

DSotM

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2019, 10:33:03 AM »
There was a YouTube video observing a mango by a home grower in full shade that was fruiting. It was in Arizona, where temps exceed 110, so perhaps that helped.

CGameProgrammer

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2019, 08:29:12 PM »
Its fruit was probably terrible though. Generally the more sunlight plants get, the sweeter the fruit. So you have to think about quality as well.

DSotM

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2019, 09:09:38 PM »
I agree, probably would never get the superior fruit regardless of plant at complete shade. How high until there is sunlight?

Guanabanus

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2019, 06:59:18 PM »
The plant pictured is Pothos, infamous among Florida gardeners as "The-Vine-From-Hell." Nothing edible.
Har

Guanabanus

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2019, 07:02:00 PM »
Jaboticaba fruits very well in bright indirect skylight, where the side of a building completely blocks the view of the sun, but no branches or eves overhang the tree.
Har

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2019, 01:53:29 PM »
Maybe not a large amount of fruit and the fruit is more of a novelty, but Monstera deliciosa/Ceriman grows in heavy to dappled shade.
Plants are available at garden centers I got a $10 pot at Home Depot which divided up into 10 new plants. They may take a year or more to mature and a year to ripen after flowering.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRL6xzDmiJY

Thatís what I was going to suggest. Donít know if Iíd put them in a novelty category, have you eaten one?  I mean I get why you might, but OMG one of the best tasting fruits Iíve ever eaten.

Agree - Monstera is great eatin' in my opinion

 

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