Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?  (Read 756 times)

BonsaiBeast

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 234
    • San Diego CA, USDA zone 10a, sunset zone 24
    • View Profile
    • BonsaiBeast
What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« on: January 19, 2019, 04:22:00 PM »





simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5311
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2019, 05:04:35 PM »
Lack of Iron, Magnesium and probably a few other trace and minors. Maybe also try decreasing the pH of your soil with some sulfur so that the micros and trace elements become available to your plant.

Simon

BonsaiBeast

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 234
    • San Diego CA, USDA zone 10a, sunset zone 24
    • View Profile
    • BonsaiBeast
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2019, 05:47:55 PM »
Lack of Iron, Magnesium and probably a few other trace and minors. Maybe also try decreasing the pH of your soil with some sulfur so that the micros and trace elements become available to your plant.

Simon

Any products you'd recommend for the nutrients?

Zpusher

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 59
    • DFW z8
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2019, 09:26:03 PM »
It could be your pH is too high. If your pH is too high plant isn't able to take in nutrient so they look like they appear to to be deficient, I'd try to lower the pH first with chelated iron drench for now and maybe look for something that will bring the soil pH down in the long run.

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5311
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2019, 01:32:20 AM »
Whenever possible, I try to correct deficiencies with a foliar spray in order to correct the deficiencies as quickly as possible with little risk of nutrient lock which can occur if you keep on drenching or fertilizing through the ground improperly wether youíre using granules or a liquid drench.

I would recommend Southern Ag Citrus nutritional spray from Home Depot because it is easy to find, cheap and effective. It has Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Zinc and Sulfur if I remember correctly. These are the main micros that our Tropicalís tend to become deficient in due to the high pH of our soil and water here in SoCal.

Soil drenches with micros and trace elements are less effective during the winter. Chelated Iron drenches work well here and EDDHA works better than HEDTA for high pH soils but take into consideration that the Iron chelates also add lead and potentially other harmful elements to your soil.

Simon


Zpusher

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 59
    • DFW z8
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2019, 11:02:53 AM »
but take into consideration that the Iron chelates also add lead and potentially other harmful elements to your soil.

Simon
Really? Never heard this before, couldn't find any scientific journals on this matter. You have any info on this?

Zpusher

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 59
    • DFW z8
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2019, 11:11:11 AM »
Not doubting what you're saying just really interested in learning more! :D

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4554
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2019, 01:37:32 PM »
Yah, I had never heard about chelates introducing lead. Most of the groves in Homestead, FL would be superfund sites by now.
Jeff  :-)

MameyDisco

  • Guayabero
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 84
  • Cuban Seeds Floridian Sunset
    • U.S.A., Florida, Homestead's Redland, 10b
    • View Profile
    • PG Tropicals & Guavonia Guava Grove
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2019, 03:26:36 PM »
Here's some info from the FSHS archive.

JABOTICABA NUTRITION EXPERIMENT by E. D. ACKERMAN (1978)

Ackerman was president of the Rare Fruit Council Intl. in 1980, this is some of the research the RFCI conducted on jaboticaba. At this point the non profit was still working inside the USDA property at Chapman Field.

"Several years ago the Rare Fruit Council, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Subtropical Horticulture Research Station, established a project to con duct research in various species of exotic subtropical and tropical fruits. One of the experiments undertaken was to determine the difference in effect of 2 fertilizers, supplemented by minor elements, on the growth of the jaboticaba, [Plinia cauliflora] (Myrtaceae).

https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/1978-vol-91/187-189%20(ACKERMAN).pdf

Member of the Rare Fruit Council International, Inc. (RFCI), MIAMI, Florida. Founding Chapter of the (RFCI) Established in 1955 http://RareFruitCouncil.org

DJ Mamey Disco's Softer Than Satin MIXES - https://www.mixcloud.com/softersatin/

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4554
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2019, 04:32:40 PM »
Interesting. Per the study, iron was not that important for growth. But zinc and manganese were. I give mine loads of zinc and manganese (in addition to iron) via Tiger brand zinc oxide and manganese oxide, which has plenty of sulfur to lower pH as well (you can find it at 7springsfarm.com). It can take many months for symptoms to improve though.

If you do use chelates in a foliar application, you typically need to spray when the leaves are tender, in which state they more readily absorb nutrients. Once the leaves are hardened, application results in a freckled appearance, with random green spots where the leaves absorbed some nutrition.

I recently discovered, though, that they fruit much (MUCH) better with a good supply of (slow-release) nitrogen. I believe nitrogen also aids in uptake of other nutrients. They can be salt sensitive, which is why I give mine slow release N. (Note: the slow release junk at the home improvement shops really only has a tiny fraction of slow release N. Look for something with the majority of N in a slow release form.)

When I had mine in pots, they loved osmocote.

Here's some info from the FSHS archive.

JABOTICABA NUTRITION EXPERIMENT by E. D. ACKERMAN (1978)

Ackerman was president of the Rare Fruit Council Intl. in 1980, this is some of the research the RFCI conducted on jaboticaba. At this point the non profit was still working inside the USDA property at Chapman Field.

"Several years ago the Rare Fruit Council, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Subtropical Horticulture Research Station, established a project to con duct research in various species of exotic subtropical and tropical fruits. One of the experiments undertaken was to determine the difference in effect of 2 fertilizers, supplemented by minor elements, on the growth of the jaboticaba, [Plinia cauliflora] (Myrtaceae).

https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/1978-vol-91/187-189%20(ACKERMAN).pdf
Jeff  :-)

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5311
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2019, 09:13:33 PM »
There was some research I saw somewhere but I canít remember where. Iíll update this thread if I can find it.

Simon

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5311
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: What's wrong with this Sabara Jaboticaba?
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2019, 10:08:55 PM »
Hereís an article that discusses solubility of heavy metals with various chelatiing agents.
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/412f/916a52d63da33786636d697cfe71d82988dd.pdf

Simon

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers