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Author Topic: keraji mandarin  (Read 7010 times)

Ilya11

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2018, 05:12:17 AM »
In this paper of DNA analysis the spelling is kabuchi ,not kubachi
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Radoslav

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2018, 12:34:52 PM »
Kābuchi  (C. keraji hort. ex Tanaka var. kabuchii hort. ex Tanaka) カーブチ (かーぶちー)
is common citrus.


Ilya11

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2018, 01:23:09 PM »
In the same DNA marker  paper it is shown that Kabuchi and Unzoki are hybrids of Kunenbo-A  and unknown citrus with cytoplasm coming from sweet orange, while Keraji is a back cross of Kabuchi to Kunenbo-A
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Radoslav

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #28 on: March 21, 2018, 01:59:13 PM »
In the same DNA marker  paper it is shown that Kabuchi and Unzoki are hybrids of Kunenbo-A  and unknown citrus with cytoplasm coming from sweet orange, while Keraji is a back cross of Kabuchi to Kunenbo-A

In one DNA study I read, that kabuchi is kunenbo x citrus  yatsushiro in another kunenbo x something like citrus depressa.
Kabuchi is chance seedling from Okinawa.

SoCal2warm

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #29 on: March 21, 2018, 04:39:23 PM »
In this paper of DNA analysis the spelling is kabuchi ,not kubachi
My apologies, it is indeed spelled kabuchi.


In one DNA study I read, that kabuchi is kunenbo x citrus  yatsushiro in another kunenbo x something like citrus depressa.
Kabuchi is chance seedling from Okinawa.
That would be interesting, so it appears keraji is a triple backcross of kunenbo with some other original citrus. Probably some sour citrus I am guessing, maybe Yuzu.
(Edit: That original sour citrus appears to be Shikuwasa or a closely related hybrid of it, as per Hybrid Origins of Citrus Varieties Inferred from DNA Marker Analysis of Nuclear and Organelle Genomes, Shimizu T, Kitajima A.)

Kunenbo appears to be some sort of mandarin x tangelo hybrid, or something like it, analogous to the type of citrus known as a tangor (Temple orange and Page mandarin could also fall into this category). What I mean is that kunenbo probably has a buntan (pomelo) ancestor going back two or three generations. That would explain its fragrance. Whether it also may have some other cold hardy species in its ancestry (like Yuzu) I'm not sure. I will point out that it doesn't necessarily have to have been descended from a cold hardy species to develop a fairly high degree of cold tolerance over several generations. The central coastal region of Japan can get quite cold some Winters, every 25 years or so. That could have killed off the less hardy citrus. From there it would be natural selection as the citrus gradually started making its way up North, over successive generations. This would also leave me inclined to think that kunenbo is probably at least in substantial part zygotic, although I don't have any information on that.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 07:56:54 PM by SoCal2warm »

jim VH

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2018, 10:58:37 AM »


I know Sudachi is pretty cold hardy (maybe not quite as hardy as Yuzu). I read on another site someone was managing to grow it outside near Portland, OR.


Yes, My Sudachi and Yuzu easily survived 8F (-13.3C) in January 2017 in Vancouver Wa., just across the Columbia river from Portland Or., with only minor small twig damage and about 20% defoliation on each.  The Sudachi appeared to have a higher percentage of small twig damage than the Yuzu.  On the other hand, the Yuzu is a much larger tree, and size does matter.

SoCal2warm

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #31 on: May 16, 2018, 05:47:30 PM »
here's a keraji seedling



maesy

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #32 on: May 18, 2018, 06:38:25 AM »
My keraji together with thomasville



murky

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #33 on: August 25, 2019, 01:44:57 PM »


I know Sudachi is pretty cold hardy (maybe not quite as hardy as Yuzu). I read on another site someone was managing to grow it outside near Portland, OR.


Yes, My Sudachi and Yuzu easily survived 8F (-13.3C) in January 2017 in Vancouver Wa., just across the Columbia river from Portland Or., with only minor small twig damage and about 20% defoliation on each.  The Sudachi appeared to have a higher percentage of small twig damage than the Yuzu.  On the other hand, the Yuzu is a much larger tree, and size does matter.

Jim, how big is your Yuzu on Flying Dragon?  I have one from OGW also, probably 5 or 6 years in the ground here in Camas, WA.  It's maybe 4 ft tall and set its 1st two fruit this year.  I'm hoping to eventually get a tree that's taller than deer browse.  I'm trying to air-layer hoping it will be more vigorous on its own roots, but not sure if it will be cold hardy enough that way.

Any comments on the flavor or uses of the Sudachi?  I really like sweetened Yuzu flavor drinks/candy and probably dessert.

jim VH

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #34 on: August 25, 2019, 04:00:52 PM »
Oh, the bulk of the tree is about 8 feet tall and six-seven feet across, though there is one errant shoot reaching for the stars at about ten foot.  This is after 12 years in the ground.

Like you, mine took about 5 years to bear it's first fruit.  Since then the yield has slowly increased on average, but there are wild swings the last few years, probably because I don't prune the thing; thus it has become biennial, or even triennial.  With thorns like that, I only dare approach it during harvest time wearing thick leather gloves and coat, and four foot pruning shears to get at the fruit, and even then I get a few stabs right through the leather.

The Sudachi has nice lemon lime flavor, though it is not uniquely aromatic the way Yuzu is. To me, the best flavor occurs when picked green, just before the peel starts to change color.  Typically late September at my location.   I use it mainly for the juice, adding it to my apple-quince sauce, or to flavor fish.  But, if allowed to ripen, the peel turns a very nice deep orange colot, and I add it to my Yuzu marmalade during years when the Yuzu crop is on the light side.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 11:45:00 AM by jim VH »

SoCal2warm

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #35 on: August 25, 2019, 10:23:16 PM »
Here's my tiny keraji seedling, now only about an inch tall, after recovering from the last winter.


I don't know if it can survive another winter, or even ever grow to become taller, tiny as it is right now and on its own roots.
Maybe next winter will be more mild.

lebmung

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Re: keraji mandarin
« Reply #36 on: September 13, 2019, 08:43:31 AM »
Here is my keraji. Growing pretty fast.


 

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