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Author Topic: Root stock question  (Read 103 times)

will2358

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Root stock question
« on: November 16, 2019, 03:35:29 PM »
I found this old rootstock in a pot outside. I was cleaning out pots from my wreck of a greenhouse and found this trifoliata that was still alive. The citrus that was grafted to it died a few years back. It has sent up a few branches and I was wondering if I could air layer all of them at once, come next spring. I know trifoliata is difficult to root but was wondering if air layering would work.



My name is Cindy

lebmung

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Re: Root stock question
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2019, 03:53:35 PM »
No it will not root. Wrong timing, the tree is asleep.

kumin

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Re: Root stock question
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2019, 04:51:23 PM »
New growth, taken from the base of the tree next spring , allowed to become semi-hard, has potential to root . The basic rule is the more tender the cutting, the easier to root, but also more likely to desiccate. Desiccated cuttings quickly lose the ability to root. So it's a bit of a balancing act between too hardened and lowered rooting ability, and too tender and susceptible to desiccation. Timing is extremely important when rooting cuttings. Senescence of the parent plant is also very important, which can be partially overcome by taking cuttings from recent growth close to the bottom of the plant.

These rules are less important with easy to root species and critical on hard to root species.   
« Last Edit: November 17, 2019, 05:28:37 AM by kumin »

Bomand

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Re: Root stock question
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2019, 06:53:26 PM »
Here is a thought. Graft different varities on the shoots of the poncirus......and I will send you some poncirus seed and you can plant you some rootstock.....much easier that trying to air layer poncirus.....

lebmung

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Re: Root stock question
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2019, 07:05:21 PM »
You can actually root the cuttings faster than airlaying, but you need experience and equipment. They take roots in a month or so, but it's a more complicated process that I won't get into details, I think it was discussed before.
If you insist to airlayer you would need to wait until april/mai next year, and roots will be ready next fall.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2019, 05:31:34 PM by lebmung »

will2358

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Re: Root stock question
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2019, 01:14:02 PM »
Here is a thought. Graft different varities on the shoots of the poncirus......and I will send you some poncirus seed and you can plant you some rootstock.....much easier that trying to air layer poncirus.....
I have seedlings growings. I just thought I would use this root stock instead of tossing it out. I will try grafting onto the shoots next spring. Thanks Bomand.
My name is Cindy

 

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