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Author Topic: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial  (Read 11317 times)

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #175 on: June 14, 2019, 10:09:20 AM »
A variegated Citrange I found recently.


Ilya11

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #176 on: June 14, 2019, 12:30:03 PM »
Does not look like albino chimera, probably either some root deficiency or a viral infection.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #177 on: June 14, 2019, 02:48:24 PM »
I tend to agree with you, Ilya. It lacks the layered look of chimeras. Several plants display yellow new growth that improves with foliar nutritional sprays. We have experienced a wet, chilly, prolonged spring to this point and there may be problems getting nutrients to the foliage.

« Last Edit: June 15, 2019, 06:18:35 AM by kumin »

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #178 on: June 14, 2019, 05:06:05 PM »
An example of defects: these two plants suffered bark freezing that healed and the plants recovered, but still are likely to carry the susceptibility.
Conestoga # 003



« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 09:35:13 AM by kumin »

Laaz

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #179 on: June 15, 2019, 07:43:51 AM »
A variegated Citrange I found recently.


That's not variegation. Ilya is correct.

hardyvermont

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #180 on: June 19, 2019, 04:23:50 PM »
A variegated Citrange I found recently.


Does anyone know what causes this?  It seems to be showing up on the new growth of Poncirus crosses. 

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #181 on: June 19, 2019, 05:02:26 PM »
I have additional plants with chlorotic growth. I haven't definitively determined the cause, hopefully it's nutritional rather than viral. In the worst cases apical growth is stunted and there is branching from a lower position on the stem.




Apical growth arrested, with unusual branching from a lower position.









« Last Edit: June 19, 2019, 05:06:06 PM by kumin »

Millet

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #182 on: June 19, 2019, 08:16:20 PM »
It looks like just new growth.  I assume you have a nutrient plan for your trees.  The yellow should turn green as the growth matures.

Delvi83

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #183 on: June 28, 2019, 11:36:41 AM »
Congratulation, it's a very good job !!!

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #184 on: July 23, 2019, 02:20:17 PM »
Here are some photos from today showing the Segentrange survivors before being planted into the soil in preparation for winter. These will be slightly protected in mid-December to mid-March.

These are the hardiest survivors, many which are making good growth through the summer.



This plant is a monofoliate Segentrange sibling to the rest of the plants. The spines are very slender and rather long. Conestoga # 058



# 010 Segentrange, one of the hardier, deciduous plants.



#002 Segentrange, an evergreen Segentrange showing good hardiness. This plant is not particularly thorny.



A TaiTri seedling making vigorous growth, having been planted from seed in late winter of 2019.



A Citrumelo also having been grown from seed in late winter of 2019.

« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 09:25:48 AM by kumin »

mikkel

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #185 on: July 24, 2019, 05:31:41 AM »
I might have missed a post but do you have backups of the survivours? I just wonder if these survivours are already reliable hardy enough for slightly warmer climates than yours.
I have several seedlings here to test but my ground in the field is so bad that Poncirus shows literally no growth in years. Will be the same with hybrids.
So I need to do small scale tests here in my house garden with better ground.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2019, 09:05:38 AM by mikkel »

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #186 on: July 24, 2019, 07:43:41 AM »
Mikkel, I don't have backups for all the survivors at this point. I have multiple backups for the best survivors. My intention is to have a lot of flowers blooming for open cross-pollination as well as controlled pollination. The protection I reference is planting in ground, but within a structure that can be covered and insulated against record low temperatures. I find that nutritional needs are met more naturally in open soil. However, I want to maintain some control over extreme temperatures and precipitation. I selected the best drained location on the property and will begin planting very shortly, so the roots can establish before winter.

The trees won't be protected until December so the cold will remain steady until spring. In the event that there's an unusually warm period in the winter, the heat must be vented outdoors. The intent is not to provide warmth during winter, rather to protect during sub-zero temperatures.

In regards to soil fertility, this region of Pennsylvania has soils that range from mediocre to very fertile, with the limestone soils being especially fertile. The greatest challenge on my property is drainage, rather than fertility, due to the clay content in the soil.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2019, 07:55:48 AM by kumin »

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #187 on: August 27, 2019, 08:02:26 AM »
January low temperatures had no impact on the fruitfulness of Poncirus. This tree is full of fruit as usual.

« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 05:57:19 AM by kumin »

SoCal2warm

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #188 on: August 27, 2019, 10:19:09 AM »
January low temperatures had no impact on the fruitfulness of Poncirus. This tree is full of fruit as usual.
That's very encouraging. Do they fully ripen where you are?

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #189 on: August 27, 2019, 10:43:43 AM »
This is the same tree last year. The fruit ripens every year, but not before October.




kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #190 on: August 28, 2019, 07:28:00 PM »
Many of the F2 Segentrange back ups have made good growth after being bark flap grafted onto Poncirus. These are smaller plants than the original survivors which have been field planted in preparation for winter. The plants are numbered and are labeled "Conestoga" a local river named for a Native American group that inhabited the area in the past. Early Swiss - German settlers subsequently carried the name to Ontario, Canada during the 1830's and named a river and town the same, albeit spelled the name slightly differently at times.

This scion made excellent growth in a short time.



Conestoga #011 Deciduous



Conestoga #010 Deciduous



Conestoga #021



Conestoga #024



Conestoga #058 Monofoliate evergreen, this plant has pleasantly scented aromatic leaves when bruised.

« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 05:58:32 AM by kumin »

Ilya11

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #191 on: August 29, 2019, 03:38:35 AM »
Nice looking plants.
Hope they will be able to harden before  frost.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #192 on: September 13, 2019, 02:48:15 PM »
2 photos of  # 011 F2 hybrid top worked on mature Poncirus trees for the upcoming winter test. This selection is one of the hardiest and multiple clones have been propagated as backups. The 3rd photo is the original survivor of these clones.





This is the original plant on May 04, 2019. This plant is deciduous and hopefully can serve as a parent in further breeding.

« Last Edit: September 13, 2019, 04:25:19 PM by kumin »

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #193 on: October 13, 2019, 06:32:07 AM »
The oldest Poncirus tree I have. The origin was from Major C Collins in Tifton, GA a cold hardy Citrus enthusiast. This selection has larger fruit than average and slightly more juice and pulp. Seediness is not less. The fruit size difference is not dramatic, but noticeable.



« Last Edit: October 13, 2019, 06:53:07 AM by kumin »

usirius

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #194 on: October 15, 2019, 03:08:55 PM »
Enclosed some actual Pictures of my Segendarin HRS899 (O or Q?) - it is surely different to poncirus - and also has some similarties - see photos enclosed. Some fruits show growths, which to my knowledge never occurs in Poncirus. The fruits also have a relatively long style and a small greenish tip, which I have observed does not occur in Poncirus fruits in this form. The smell of HRS899 fruits is a bit more pleasant than that of Poncirus fruits, and has a slight orange aroma. But look at the pictures that say more than 1000 words.






„May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.“ N. Mandela

Bomand

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #195 on: October 15, 2019, 03:23:18 PM »
A little diffrent from poncirus but one can see the similarities....hard to smell the picture.😁

usirius

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #196 on: October 15, 2019, 03:30:55 PM »
I agree... but I could send you a fruit, then you can smell it! I don't know if sending and importing is allowed. Or someone invents (finally) I agree... but I could send you a fruit, then you can smell it! I don't know if sending and importing is allowed. Or somebody invents (finally) the transmission of smells and perhaps also of flavours - like of pictures, sounds, texts... I think he would get rich!
„May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.“ N. Mandela

kumin

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #197 on: October 15, 2019, 03:38:41 PM »
Great photos, do you have any photos of cut fruit? The fruit does look distinct from Poncirus. How does this tree's hardiness compare to Poncirus? I assume Poncirus has no hardiness issues in your location.

 I once transplanted a mature Poncirus tree with very pronounced nipples on the fruit. The stem end was also elongated a bit, giving a somewhat lemon-like appearance.  The tree trunk was 10 cm in diameter and did not survive transplantation. It would have been wiser to transplant a few of the small seedlings growing under the tree, or save some of the fruits.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2019, 07:13:21 AM by kumin »

Bomand

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #198 on: October 15, 2019, 05:29:11 PM »
I agree... but I could send you a fruit, then you can smell it! I don't know if sending and importing is allowed. Or someone invents (finally) I agree... but I could send you a fruit, then you can smell it! I don't know if sending and importing is allowed. Or somebody invents (finally) the transmission of smells and perhaps also of flavours - like of pictures, sounds, texts... I think he would get rich!  Yes I agree. Dont send me a fruit. I am too old to go to jail. I will just imagine😄.

usirius

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Re: F2 citrange winter hardiness trial
« Reply #199 on: October 17, 2019, 03:35:29 AM »
@Kumin:
 I cutted some years ago one and I remember they have some seeds and not much pulpe, which smelled like poncirus fruits, I did not taste them.l cut one or two after being dully ripe and droping down - I think in abut 4 weeks later. I will post phots than. Two fruits should contains seeds which are results of pollination with "Lemonade" - a sweet and very aromatic lemon like Citrus variety from New Zealand. I think the result of the hybridization will be a robust citrus hybrid with very aromatic fruits.

@Bomand:
;-)   But I don't think they'll put you in jail for a fruit. There was only once in human history a big problem because of a fruit..... that was back then in the Garden of Eden, also called Paradise!

« Last Edit: October 22, 2019, 02:59:30 PM by usirius »
„May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.“ N. Mandela

 

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