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Author Topic: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties  (Read 3976 times)

skhan

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Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« on: March 22, 2019, 12:08:42 PM »
To quickly summarize previous discussions on Kwai Muks:
It takes a long time to get fruit from a seedling.
Starts off growing slow then speeds up.
Fruits are sweet and tart but seem to be highly variable.
Trees don't seem to be bothered by much.
Great candidate for grafting.



With that being said, it would be great if anyone could comment on good varieties they've tasted, seen, developed or are growing themselves.
This tree is not widely growing so the improvements will be far and few.
Starting off from a decent gene pool will probably help us along.


There's some more good information in the post below
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=8181.0
« Last Edit: December 26, 2019, 08:09:23 AM by skhan »
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barath

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2019, 12:57:34 AM »
I'd be interested to hear about any varieties -- I'm growing a few seedlings grown from seed from Oscar.  I'm sure it will be a very long time before they fruit because they're only about a year old.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2019, 07:23:41 AM »
I think that the quality can vary and this interests me too, especially after eating some very good ones in Borneo last year.  I have five seedlings coming along from there as well as some 3 year old trees that have grown well.  They are about 15í tall with trunks of 3-4Ē.  I wouldnít be surprised to see them flower this year.  Unfortunately I didnít get to try that material and I have eaten Kwai muk from a different tree here that wasnít good enough for me to plant the seeds, very tart.
A good one would certainly be worth selecting.
Peter

OCchris1

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2019, 01:27:56 AM »
I have a Kwai Muk in a 25 gallon container that's about 7-8 ft. Just noticed this afternoon, while playing frisbee w/ the kids, that it was covered in newly forming flowers. Last year it bloomed for the first time (I believe.) I think its about 6 years old. This tree is on my short list to go into the ground this Spring. Hope it doesn't suck!
-Chris

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2019, 01:56:33 AM »
Never heard of anyone selecting out choice varieties of kwai muk. I have one large tree that produces large fruits that are very tasty. Am willing to send scions to anyone interested. I just planted at a different location a whole row of kwai muk as windbreak. They were from seeds sourced from Florida some years ago from 3 different trees, so hopefully eventually i'll have more to select from and come up with different strains.
Oscar

skhan

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2019, 04:09:55 PM »
Never heard of anyone selecting out choice varieties of kwai muk. I have one large tree that produces large fruits that are very tasty. Am willing to send scions to anyone interested. I just planted at a different location a whole row of kwai muk as windbreak. They were from seeds sourced from Florida some years ago from 3 different trees, so hopefully eventually i'll have more to select from and come up with different strains.

I might have to take you up on that offer in a month or two
Thanks
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Barnacle1982

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2019, 08:16:26 PM »
I have one in my yard that fruited last year. I do know what variety it is, but it is nothing special. My fruit was tart with no sweetness whatsoever. I tasted one for the first time, at the Grimal Grove in Big Pine key, and it was really good.

Rob P

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2019, 02:13:59 AM »
I have four large trees from three different sources which are all well over 20years old, and none of them produce fruit worth eating (small and sour). Not wanting to give up on this fruit I recently obtained a really nice variety sourced from a fruit research station in Borneo, this tree was bought from a top grower in North Queensland and planted just over 3 weeks ago. It has already put on a lot of growth, so hopefully in a few years I can enjoy these fruits! If this is the case I can top work my other trees to this variety in the future.

shpaz

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2019, 02:46:36 AM »
For those growing them from seeds, how long did they take to germinate? I have planted 5 seeds in peat + perlit mix 2.5 months ago.

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2019, 04:15:54 AM »
For those growing them from seeds, how long did they take to germinate? I have planted 5 seeds in peat + perlit mix 2.5 months ago.
It's the slowest artocarpus species i've seen to germinate. Took many months to come up, as i recall it was at least 3 months, so be very patient.
Oscar

Finca La Isla

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2019, 10:44:39 AM »
What about handling and shelf life of Kwai muk.  Can this fruit be picked at a stage that would allow some form of packing, at least to pick it the day before a farmers market?  What would anyone recommend, what are your experiences?
Thanks, Peter

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2019, 11:37:09 PM »
What about handling and shelf life of Kwai muk.  Can this fruit be picked at a stage that would allow some form of packing, at least to pick it the day before a farmers market?  What would anyone recommend, what are your experiences?
Thanks, Peter
Main shortcoming of this fruit is short shelf life. It's good only for local markets. If you picked it while just starting to turn color, place in the field into a cooler immediately, then it could keep 3 days.
Oscar

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2019, 06:37:43 AM »
3 days is good, I have a hard time getting them from the tree to the kitchen. The one I have is nice if left to soften on the tree.

Rob

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2019, 06:39:54 AM »
I saw a Kwai muk in the Artocarpus collection in Tenom/Borneo. While all other A. species had straight trunks and were about 20 m tall the Kwai muk was barely 3 m tall, with a crooked, much branched trunk. Is this the normal growth form for this species?

Finca La Isla

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2019, 10:21:44 AM »
I have a lot of hope for Kwai muk.  I pick fruit on a Friday to sell Saturday morning, Iím hoping I can make that work with this fruit.

I ate fruit from the tree at Tenom and that really convinced me on the quality.  I have two developing trees that we are trying to shape like we work Jakfruit, not letting them go over about 4 meters.  They do seem to want the drop lower branches and go up.  Iím thinking that with the seed material I got from Tenom that I will snip the tips, starting lower down.  That tree there was very easy to harvest, more a large bush than a tree.

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2019, 04:52:37 PM »
I saw a Kwai muk in the Artocarpus collection in Tenom/Borneo. While all other A. species had straight trunks and were about 20 m tall the Kwai muk was barely 3 m tall, with a crooked, much branched trunk. Is this the normal growth form for this species?
No, that is not normal.
Oscar

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2019, 04:54:46 PM »
I saw a Kwai muk in the Artocarpus collection in Tenom/Borneo. While all other A. species had straight trunks and were about 20 m tall the Kwai muk was barely 3 m tall, with a crooked, much branched trunk. Is this the normal growth form for this species?
No, that is not normal.
20-25 feet is normal

snowjunky

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #17 on: December 22, 2019, 09:18:25 PM »
I can't believe they say Kwai Muk is "Native from Kwangtung, China, to Hong Kong". Kwangtung=Guangdong.  I've never seen this fruit there before.  Plenty of lychees and longans, but wth is a Kwai Muk?

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #18 on: December 22, 2019, 09:48:32 PM »
I can't believe they say Kwai Muk is "Native from Kwangtung, China, to Hong Kong". Kwangtung=Guangdong.  I've never seen this fruit there before.  Plenty of lychees and longans, but wth is a Kwai Muk?
This fruit is very perishable. Probably why you've never seen it in markets.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #19 on: December 22, 2019, 10:03:11 PM »
They get sold in markets in punnets occasionally here like figs or berries. A friend has 4 large trees and the fruit quality,productivity and characteristics seem quite different between the trees although the trees look the same.

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #20 on: December 22, 2019, 10:09:24 PM »
They get sold in markets in punnets occasionally here like figs or berries. A friend has 4 large trees and the fruit quality,productivity and characteristics seem quite different between the trees although the trees look the same.
I planted also a few different types of kwai muk and will attempt to market them when they all fruit. But i can tell it will be challenging. I have one mature tree that produces huge amounts, very good quality, nice reddish flesh, but does not keep well at all, and the exterior is very delicate, more so than a fig.
Oscar

snowjunky

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #21 on: December 22, 2019, 10:28:08 PM »
Do they freeze well like durian?

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2019, 01:30:05 AM »
Do they freeze well like durian?
Haven't tried freezing them, but some friends did and they said it worked fine. I dehydrated a bunch and they are tasty!
Oscar

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2019, 04:25:21 AM »
I would request skhan as OP to remove Artocarpus hypargyraeus (sic.) from topic title, since that is incorrect. Artocarpus is about to undergo a major shakeup thanks to phylogenomic work recently done. A paper dealing with proposed new binomials will be published in January or February. At any rate, both by current systematics and the provisional new one A. hypargyreus is incorrect, since that has long peduncles and is not in cultivation.

What is in cultivation is indeed the real kwai muk (better pinyin would be 'gwaimuk'), but the associated binomial has almost always been mistaken. Its current ID is A. nitidus subsp. lingnanensis, but will probably become A. parvus.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2019, 04:23:57 AM by Mango Stein »
There's no such thing as "ultra tropical"

snowjunky

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2019, 08:57:27 PM »
How about A. hole ... a lot easier to remember.

 

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