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Author Topic: Leggy satsuma mandarin  (Read 177 times)

hawkfish007

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Leggy satsuma mandarin
« on: April 09, 2019, 09:49:22 PM »
Why is my satsuma mandarin so leggy to the point needing a support stick? Is it because of too much nitrogen fertilizer, I feed 20-20-20 with Trace elements every time I water with ez flow and drip.



SoCal2warm

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Re: Leggy satsuma mandarin
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 10:46:25 PM »
Trim off the apical bud if you want it to branch out.

If the natural behavior of a fruit tree ever baffles you, realize it's not truly natural, because your tree is grafted onto rootstock, which affects a lot of growth habit behavior that ends up needing to be compensated for.

And yes, you might have made it grow too fast. Don't expect any fruit this year.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2019, 10:48:28 PM by SoCal2warm »

Millet

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Re: Leggy satsuma mandarin
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2019, 10:47:25 PM »
Over fertilization could well be the problem, and probably is.. However, much depends on the amount of fertilizer you apply with each application..  For a young in ground citrus tree do not use a fertilizer with higher than an 8-8-8 analysis during the first 3 years of the trees life. A 1 year old tree should be fertilized 6 times per the growing season equally spaced out.  A 2 year old tree 5 times the growing season equally spaced out.  A 3 year old tree 4 times during the growing season,  For trees 4 years and older fertilize 3 times the growing season. For young trees apply fertilizer in a 3-ft. diameter circle around the tree.  As the tree becomes older, the area fertilized should be enlarged as the root system expands.  As a rule of thumb, fertilize an area twice the diameter of the tree canopy.   Care should be taken to avoid root and trunk damage by uneven placement or mounding the fertilizer against the trunk. Recommendations for the amount of fertilizer to apply.  Apply 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 lbs. actual nitrogen per tree during years 1, 2 and 3 respectively (divided the recommended actual nitrogen by the number of applications per growing season).   Thereafter, increase the amount of actual nitrogen applied according to tree growth, up to but not more than 1.5 lbs. actual nitrogen per tree per year.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2019, 10:50:46 PM by Millet »

Laaz

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Re: Leggy satsuma mandarin
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2019, 09:59:26 AM »
Young trees tend to do that. I top each branch where I feel it looks good. Topping each branch forces the tree to flush out more growth below & soon you'll have a tree with your desired look. It's not unusual for citrus to produce whats called a water sprout. A water sprout is a very aggressive new branch that doubles or triples the growth of other branches. I usually cut these way back.

hawkfish007

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Re: Leggy satsuma mandarin
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2019, 10:52:29 AM »
Good advice. I was thinking it's odd for a citrus to grow like a vine, I take it it's due to high fertilization and growth of a water sprout. I will prune the growth. Thanks.

Isaac-1

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Re: Leggy satsuma mandarin
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2019, 06:49:15 PM »
I agree, this is one of those rare cases where you should probably trim it back to the point where it is semi-self supporting, and then remove the stake so it can flex and strengthen, citrus wood is far more flexible than most other fruit tree wood.

 

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