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Author Topic: root rot strategy  (Read 379 times)

rtdrury

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root rot strategy
« on: July 30, 2020, 08:17:14 PM »
We have a planting spot in which four young trees (1 Mamey Sapote, 2 Canistels, 1 Jamaica Cherry), planted there successively, died from root rot within a year.  So we replaced the soil there and planted a young Rollinia.  We think we should do more and remove a gallon volume of soil around the root crown for a couple of weeks, so it can dry out real good, then add it back in, twice a year for a few years.  Does anyone's experience suggest that this strategy could be helpful?

SeaWalnut

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Re: root rot strategy
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2020, 08:45:19 AM »
You can make a small hill and plant the tree on top of that as it will dry faster.

pineislander

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Re: root rot strategy
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2020, 05:32:08 PM »
With your inland location subject to frost you should reconsider the choice of fruits which are pretty tender. I've heard many north of Orlando have trouble with even mango. Is there a possibility that you are getting a high water table condition? Did the root rot take place in which season? Young trees are very susceptible to high water. Try digging a two foot deep hole in the area and monitoring the water level during a rain event.
Can you take a picture of the area showing the vegetation growing there? Is there dollar weed present? It is sometimes a sign of high water table.

rtdrury

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Re: root rot strategy
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2020, 08:10:54 PM »
Just this one planting spot was a problem for several young trees while surrounding spots no problem.  No dollar weeds.  Several opportunities to see a high water table because we dig large diameter 2ft deep planting holes.  We get lots of torrential downpours but water sits on surface at most a few minutes.  We just think it's a weird abberation that this one spot kills trees but we need to plant in it and it seems digging around the root crown periodically may be an effective offensive against that root rot.  If root rot gets the extended roots way out and travels toward the crown, this strategy also gives us a chance to stop it before it reaches the crown.

Mark in Texas

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Re: root rot strategy
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2020, 11:13:57 AM »
You're a perfect candidate for bottomless RootBuilder "pots" aka raised beds.


 

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