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Author Topic: Verry rare walnut  (Read 1348 times)

SeaWalnut

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Verry rare walnut
« on: April 18, 2019, 03:33:29 AM »
These are somme really rare giant walnuts that i got from an old tree .With the green husks on the tree they are almost as big as a male fist.I germinated all of them with 100 percent success even thogh they had a bit of mold inside .The mold appears because the nut shells dont seal verry well .Taste is verry good and they grow fast ,aparently being the second fastest fruiting walnut after the white walnut J Cinerea .But unlike J Cinerea these are long lived trees and the fast growth i think it comes from the fact that they grow from a giant seed.Somme countryes registered these as cultivars (in New Zealand i think),but here in the Carpathian Mountains they grow wild mostly planted by crows.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2019, 03:44:47 AM by SeaWalnut »

Pokeweed

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2019, 07:15:50 AM »
Impressive. I didn't know about those. Thanks for posting them.                                                                       Pokeweed.

cmichael258

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2019, 08:24:12 PM »
Thanks! Very interesting.
Michael

shaneatwell

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2019, 01:13:05 AM »
Very cool. Where can i get it?
Shane

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2019, 03:14:21 AM »
Im not selling just presenting them.Because these trees are soo rare (just a few trees left) even here where they are native and everybody with a little land has a walnut ,they might be close to impossible to get.I know somme company from Moldova ,the neighbouring country ,found a tree and tooked scions and now propagates and sell them under Carpatica brand.The cost its like 100 dollars for a tree but he doesnt have them for sale ( in stock).I found a tree and i got the nuts from it and will grow them altough the seedlings i grow will not be identical to the parent .But because the walnuts are self polinated by wind, and even if it has just one of the parrents traits, i still hope to get these giant nuts growing on my trees.Here in Romania we didnt registered these as cultivars but otther countryes did. I post somme pictures from the moldovan site and a link ,thogh,most likely they will not send outside of EU. http://www.nucialtoiti.md/soiuri-de-nuci-pepiniera-voinesti/
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 05:10:17 AM by SeaWalnut »

All the fruit

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2019, 01:08:35 PM »
In SW-Germany walnuts like these (size of a chicken egg and mostly the bell shape from the pics) are not too uncommon. Most people complain about the mold and how hard it is to dry them. But they are supposed to be eaten fresh and are so big to make removing the bitter yellow skin easier. Try the fresh nuts, they are my favorite.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2019, 04:38:40 PM »
In SW-Germany walnuts like these (size of a chicken egg and mostly the bell shape from the pics) are not too uncommon. Most people complain about the mold and how hard it is to dry them. But they are supposed to be eaten fresh and are so big to make removing the bitter yellow skin easier. Try the fresh nuts, they are my favorite.
Here we have a tradition to eat fresh nuts and there is even a holiday for that ( saint Ilie).I know they are better without the skin and if you only eat the white  kernel.These trees are endangered and soo rare even here in Carpathians Mountains where its their native range( Juglans Regia its called carpathian walnut for a reason and even walnut means valachian nut where valachia=romanian country).I bet  that everybody that would see these for real in SW Germany would probably have a shock,except you that your a fruit connoiseur.That explains how rare they are.

Luisport

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2019, 07:13:20 AM »
I try to buy one tree but they don't sell it...

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2019, 08:52:47 AM »
Today, Sterculius himself ( the roman God of manure) visited my orchard.The big walnuts like the fresh cow manure diluted 50/50 with water.They got like 2 litters each and immediatly after ,half a bucket of water on the manure.The growth is almost a meter in just 3 weeks.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 08:54:58 AM by SeaWalnut »

Standardbloke

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2019, 10:34:54 PM »
Today, Sterculius himself ( the roman God of manure) visited my orchard.The big walnuts like the fresh cow manure diluted 50/50 with water.They got like 2 litters each and immediatly after ,half a bucket of water on the manure.The growth is almost a meter in just 3 weeks.


I like to do this too, especially if the manure is hardened. I use horse manure because I have a horse, but cow manure is better.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2019, 08:31:46 AM »
I use fresh manure because it contains more nitrogen than hardened manure but verry important its that i dilute it a lot.Dryed manure lacks nitrogen and i think it even draws nitrogen from soil to decompose.Its like composting straws,they rot verry slow until you add a rich nitrogen source.I use straw mulch and it doesnt rot until i add fertiliser rich in N.

Standardbloke

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2019, 05:40:48 PM »
I use fresh manure because it contains more nitrogen than hardened manure but verry important its that i dilute it a lot.Dryed manure lacks nitrogen and i think it even draws nitrogen from soil to decompose.Its like composting straws,they rot verry slow until you add a rich nitrogen source.I use straw mulch and it doesnt rot until i add fertiliser rich in N.


In Australia, we have dung beetles. They were introduced from Africa (I think) and do a very good job of breaking down the manure and ferrying it underground. I do what you do; put  it in a barrow, wet it, mix it up with some volcanic ash or other rock flour, and apportion it around the roots of trees. Sometimes I'll mix in some shredded leaves. It seems to work and is a good, gentle fertilizer. Dragonfruit respond very well to it. Only downside is that because it's horse manure, I do get weeds coming up occasionally...cows are better at breaking down seeds, so I wish I had a cow! But I don't really have the room for one and I don't think my zoning allows for it.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2019, 07:28:08 PM »
I use fresh manure because it contains more nitrogen than hardened manure but verry important its that i dilute it a lot.Dryed manure lacks nitrogen and i think it even draws nitrogen from soil to decompose.Its like composting straws,they rot verry slow until you add a rich nitrogen source.I use straw mulch and it doesnt rot until i add fertiliser rich in N.


In Australia, we have dung beetles. They were introduced from Africa (I think) and do a very good job of breaking down the manure and ferrying it underground. I do what you do; put  it in a barrow, wet it, mix it up with some volcanic ash or other rock flour, and apportion it around the roots of trees. Sometimes I'll mix in some shredded leaves. It seems to work and is a good, gentle fertilizer. Dragonfruit respond very well to it. Only downside is that because it's horse manure, I do get weeds coming up occasionally...cows are better at breaking down seeds, so I wish I had a cow! But I don't really have the room for one and I don't think my zoning allows for it.
I wish i had a horse.Tryed to buy one that was worked by his owner but after i read more it would have been too dangerous for the horse to keep it on my land because i have bees and they are too sensitive to bees stings plus they slap the bees with theyr tails and that annoys the bees.The dung beetles are really fast to show up and break down the manure .We have them here too.

All the fruit

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2019, 05:33:46 AM »
We also have dung beetles in Europe. But they are mostly small and live in the forests. When there is no dung they roll balls made of mushrooms.

In honour of Sterculius you could plant Sterculia = Java olive

https://youtu.be/t6xgKmDyXfg

Very ornamental tropical nutlets with an unique taste.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2019, 06:06:01 AM »
We also have dung beetles in Europe. But they are mostly small and live in the forests. When there is no dung they roll balls made of mushrooms.

In honour of Sterculius you could plant Sterculia = Java olive

https://youtu.be/t6xgKmDyXfg

Very ornamental tropical nutlets with an unique taste.
Where i collect the manure ,the dry ones have houndreds of small ,1 cm long ,dung beetles.Those with beetles i consider them good for pots and allready aged.
I had a feeling you tryed the Sterculia allready  ;D.I ve read about that tree .

All the fruit

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2019, 11:01:59 AM »
Yes, there are lots of Sterculia species in Asia. Very confusing. But not hardy enough for Romania.

Patanax

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2019, 06:11:17 PM »
A similar walnut is planted at the Austropalm nursery in Guntramsdorf, south of Vienna. They don't seem to sell trees though, at least at the moment, and even if they did, their plants are very overpriced.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 06:13:14 PM by Patanax »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2019, 08:43:32 PM »



got these from a guy in Ukraine

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2019, 09:43:26 PM »



got these from a guy in Ukraine
Nice.Soak them in water for 2 days then keep in the fridge for 2-3 months in a plastig bag with moist paper.

usirius

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #19 on: September 02, 2019, 04:28:49 PM »
Here in southern Germany there are growing some walnut trees with great nuts and similar nut Shell shape,  but not as such big nuts as shown, and we call them "Horsenuts".

Some nurseries are selling a great nut fruiting selection called "Finkenwerder Deichnuss Royal" (deich = dyke, nuss = nut, dyke - because selected in area of dykes at the Northern Sea)

Here are some descrdptions of this nut:

https://www.friesland-walnuss.de/unsere-walnuss-sorten
https://www.walnuss24.de/shop/walnussbaum-sorten/walnussbaum-finkenwerder-deichnuss-royal-s


Finkenwerder Deichnuss Royal

Probably the biggest and tastiest peel nut - from Finkenwerder. As a single tree or as a plantation tree for the direct marketing of nuts. It is a protected variety.

This nut was bred on the Elbe island Finkenwerder in Hamburg. With a nut size of seven centimetres, sometimes even more, it is a particularly large-fruity nut whose kernel, in contrast to other particularly large nuts, fills the shell well - a highly valued quality feature. Such nuts are much easier to dry and store than those whose kernels do not fill the shell. The variety is also rich, the fruits have a pleasant, nutty taste. If the variety were evaluated according to the criteria of the Swiss ranking list of nut varieties, it would be at the top of the list.

------------------

Now a longer interesting article from a newspaper:

https://www.abendblatt.de/hamburg/harburg/article212123353/Die-Koenigin-der-Nuesse-waechst-in-Finkenwerder.html

The Deichnuss Royal has a diameter of 70 millimetres - twice as much as a fruit in a bag.

Finkenwerder.  In the plantations on the Lower Elbe, the harvest is going into its final spurt. In addition to the late varieties of apples and pears, it is now also the turn of the nuts, which some fruit growers are still growing on the side. In Finkenwerder there is a special walnut variety: the "Deichnuss Royal" is not only huge but also tasty. The nut is a rarity - still.
 
Johannes "Hans" Pylarczik is not satisfied: The nuts on the dry sieves in front of him are good, but they are too few. "That's the same with nuts this year as with fruit," he says. "the late frost in spring caused many fruits to freeze to death on the tree."

The nuts themselves are huge. The average calibre of the Deichnuss Royal is about 70 millimetres. Some nuts even reach 85 millimetres. Pylarczik can show what this means in comparison to average walnuts on a range of calibres from Grenoble, Europe's walnut stronghold: The largest hole in the French stencil is 38 millimetres in size.
 
The size is not the only special feature of the "Deichnuss Royal". There are some walnut varieties with large fruit - although their diameter is usually at most 50 millimetres. Often, however, only the skin is so large and the kernel could not keep up with the growth. "This is different with our nuts," says Hans Pylarczik. "Here the kernel fills the shell completely.
 
Maintaining large kernels is also the real reason why Hans Pylarczik, his daughter and son-in-law bred the "Deichnuss Royal".
 
"We have been producing peel nuts for generations", says Pylarczik, "these are the walnuts in which the skin can be removed from the kernel with a fingernail. The skin is very bitter and without the skin the kernel tastes much milder. We then noticed that customers always prefer the largest peel nuts because it is then more convenient to peel."
 
So Pylarczik started to propagate only those nut trees that bore particularly large fruits. "The others are immediately processed into firewood," he says.
 
In order to achieve results as quickly as possible, Pylarczik does not wait for the tree to bear fruit naturally - that would be about 12 years later, but instead focuses on refinement, as in fruit growing. The grafted trees bear fruit after only two years.
 
Hans Pylarczik is not a pioneer for the first time: in the 1980s, he was Finkenwerder's first organic apple grower. At that time he was still smiled at. Later, when he and other organic farmers on the Elbe island took the apple variety "Finkenwerder Herbstprinz" out of the water and brought not only the apple but also Finkenwerder fruit growing back on everyone's lips, the mockery of the past had long since given way to recognition.
 
Pylarczik and his family no longer cultivate fruit. "You need more and more land to be profitable," he says. "For a long time, we were among those who leased land from others who had already closed down their business. In the end, we were still a handful of farms here in Finkenwerder. When I took over, there were still forty farms here. Now we have also subleased. Only the walnut trees we still have."
 
There are 50 walnut trees in the plantation. All carry large calibres, but only one carries the "Finkenwerder Deichnuss Royal". The application is still pending at the Plant Variety Protection Office to register the Finkenwerder Nuss as an independent variety. Biologists and bureaucrats are working on it with great meticulousness. The application was submitted in 2013. Since then, provisional plant variety protection has also been in force. If the procedure by and the "Finkenwerder Deichnuss Royal" is a protected variety, it will be propagated in a targeted manner and then be put into regular production and sale.
 
The variety is called "Deichnuss" because the fruit growers had traditionally planted their nut trees on the summer dikes. Due to the elevated location, they were less susceptible to frost. However, since the nature reserve "Finkenwerder Süderelbe" was established and the summer dikes are open to the public, fruit growers have been able to forget the nut harvest there. "If we want to harvest, the trees have already been plundered," says Hans Pylarczik. "The worst thing is that some people throw truncheons into the trees so that the nuts fall off. They damage the tree."
 
Pylarczik harvests his nuts from the ground. "Then the green skin can be loosened much more easily than when the nut is laboriously removed from the tree," he says.
 
The harvest is sold via the Hamburg wholesale market. Hans Pylarczik is therefore unable to say in which shops the Finkenwerder giant nuts end up. Once the plant variety protection procedure is complete, individual retailers will certainly advertise having the "Finkenwerder Deichnuss Royal" in their assortment. At the moment, you can only be sure to preserve the giant peel nuts with your own garden: Pylarczik's nursery partner Thorsten Klock sells trees grafted with Deichnuss Royal plugs on the Internet. They cost starting from 90 euro upward. That is no cheap pleasure, but a special one. After all one has then a queen in the garden


----------------------------

So far to some descriptions deliverable. I have bought two plants, both for about 90 EUR each  plant last year I got the first nuts, see photo enclosed which show them in comparison to another also big walnut:




I can send some seeds (nuts)  in next years to anyone is interested but I do not belive that the plants will bear exactly same fruits.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2019, 05:04:54 PM by usirius »
„May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.“ N. Mandela

SeaWalnut

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2019, 04:57:10 PM »
Thx for sharing Ulrich.These trees are soo rare i couldnt get scions even thogh i live in Romania ,thats why i planted the seeds.They will be variable but i hope one or 2 will mantain the big nuts genes and then i will graft that on the otther walnuts i have.

usirius

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Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2019, 02:07:48 PM »
Yes @SeaWalnut, I understand the Situation of course. As told I bought two samples of Finkenwerder Deichnuss Royal - so I would have more early such large nuts and can also be sure to have such a big nut. This year one of my two small trees which are littler than 1 m bear second time fruit, see photos enclosed -also in compariosn to other rather big normal walnuts.












The size of the nut is not so large as announced by the breeder, but Iwould like to remark two issues:

1. The season has been extremely dryeraly no rain the whole summer Long, and I could not water the tree - it grows on my propperty which is about 20km away from my home

2. Thre tree is very small.

So - maybe this are reasons for not bearing so tall fruits as announced. I will see next years if next harvest of nuts will show more large nuts.
„May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.“ N. Mandela

 

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