Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Verry rare walnut  (Read 985 times)

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Verry rare walnut
« on: April 18, 2019, 03:33:29 AM »
These are somme really rare giant walnuts that i got from an old tree .With the green husks on the tree they are almost as big as a male fist.I germinated all of them with 100 percent success even thogh they had a bit of mold inside .The mold appears because the nut shells dont seal verry well .Taste is verry good and they grow fast ,aparently being the second fastest fruiting walnut after the white walnut J Cinerea .But unlike J Cinerea these are long lived trees and the fast growth i think it comes from the fact that they grow from a giant seed.Somme countryes registered these as cultivars (in New Zealand i think),but here in the Carpathian Mountains they grow wild mostly planted by crows.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2019, 03:44:47 AM by SeaWalnut »

Pokeweed

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 44
    • Houston TX
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2019, 07:15:50 AM »
Impressive. I didn't know about those. Thanks for posting them.                                                                       Pokeweed.

cmichael258

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 766
    • St. Pete, Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2019, 08:24:12 PM »
Thanks! Very interesting.
Michael

shaneatwell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 978
    • California, San Diego, sunset 23 and 18
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2019, 01:13:05 AM »
Very cool. Where can i get it?
Shane

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2019, 03:14:21 AM »
Im not selling just presenting them.Because these trees are soo rare (just a few trees left) even here where they are native and everybody with a little land has a walnut ,they might be close to impossible to get.I know somme company from Moldova ,the neighbouring country ,found a tree and tooked scions and now propagates and sell them under Carpatica brand.The cost its like 100 dollars for a tree but he doesnt have them for sale ( in stock).I found a tree and i got the nuts from it and will grow them altough the seedlings i grow will not be identical to the parent .But because the walnuts are self polinated by wind, and even if it has just one of the parrents traits, i still hope to get these giant nuts growing on my trees.Here in Romania we didnt registered these as cultivars but otther countryes did. I post somme pictures from the moldovan site and a link ,thogh,most likely they will not send outside of EU. http://www.nucialtoiti.md/soiuri-de-nuci-pepiniera-voinesti/
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 05:10:17 AM by SeaWalnut »

All the fruit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
    • Germany
    • View Profile
    • Youtube: all the fruit
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2019, 01:08:35 PM »
In SW-Germany walnuts like these (size of a chicken egg and mostly the bell shape from the pics) are not too uncommon. Most people complain about the mold and how hard it is to dry them. But they are supposed to be eaten fresh and are so big to make removing the bitter yellow skin easier. Try the fresh nuts, they are my favorite.

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2019, 04:38:40 PM »
In SW-Germany walnuts like these (size of a chicken egg and mostly the bell shape from the pics) are not too uncommon. Most people complain about the mold and how hard it is to dry them. But they are supposed to be eaten fresh and are so big to make removing the bitter yellow skin easier. Try the fresh nuts, they are my favorite.
Here we have a tradition to eat fresh nuts and there is even a holiday for that ( saint Ilie).I know they are better without the skin and if you only eat the white  kernel.These trees are endangered and soo rare even here in Carpathians Mountains where its their native range( Juglans Regia its called carpathian walnut for a reason and even walnut means valachian nut where valachia=romanian country).I bet  that everybody that would see these for real in SW Germany would probably have a shock,except you that your a fruit connoiseur.That explains how rare they are.

Luisport

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2606
  • New in tropical fruit growing!
    • Fatima, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2019, 07:13:20 AM »
I try to buy one tree but they don't sell it...

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2019, 08:52:47 AM »
Today, Sterculius himself ( the roman God of manure) visited my orchard.The big walnuts like the fresh cow manure diluted 50/50 with water.They got like 2 litters each and immediatly after ,half a bucket of water on the manure.The growth is almost a meter in just 3 weeks.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 08:54:58 AM by SeaWalnut »

Standardbloke

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 17
    • Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2019, 10:34:54 PM »
Today, Sterculius himself ( the roman God of manure) visited my orchard.The big walnuts like the fresh cow manure diluted 50/50 with water.They got like 2 litters each and immediatly after ,half a bucket of water on the manure.The growth is almost a meter in just 3 weeks.


I like to do this too, especially if the manure is hardened. I use horse manure because I have a horse, but cow manure is better.

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2019, 08:31:46 AM »
I use fresh manure because it contains more nitrogen than hardened manure but verry important its that i dilute it a lot.Dryed manure lacks nitrogen and i think it even draws nitrogen from soil to decompose.Its like composting straws,they rot verry slow until you add a rich nitrogen source.I use straw mulch and it doesnt rot until i add fertiliser rich in N.

Standardbloke

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 17
    • Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2019, 05:40:48 PM »
I use fresh manure because it contains more nitrogen than hardened manure but verry important its that i dilute it a lot.Dryed manure lacks nitrogen and i think it even draws nitrogen from soil to decompose.Its like composting straws,they rot verry slow until you add a rich nitrogen source.I use straw mulch and it doesnt rot until i add fertiliser rich in N.


In Australia, we have dung beetles. They were introduced from Africa (I think) and do a very good job of breaking down the manure and ferrying it underground. I do what you do; put  it in a barrow, wet it, mix it up with some volcanic ash or other rock flour, and apportion it around the roots of trees. Sometimes I'll mix in some shredded leaves. It seems to work and is a good, gentle fertilizer. Dragonfruit respond very well to it. Only downside is that because it's horse manure, I do get weeds coming up occasionally...cows are better at breaking down seeds, so I wish I had a cow! But I don't really have the room for one and I don't think my zoning allows for it.

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2019, 07:28:08 PM »
I use fresh manure because it contains more nitrogen than hardened manure but verry important its that i dilute it a lot.Dryed manure lacks nitrogen and i think it even draws nitrogen from soil to decompose.Its like composting straws,they rot verry slow until you add a rich nitrogen source.I use straw mulch and it doesnt rot until i add fertiliser rich in N.


In Australia, we have dung beetles. They were introduced from Africa (I think) and do a very good job of breaking down the manure and ferrying it underground. I do what you do; put  it in a barrow, wet it, mix it up with some volcanic ash or other rock flour, and apportion it around the roots of trees. Sometimes I'll mix in some shredded leaves. It seems to work and is a good, gentle fertilizer. Dragonfruit respond very well to it. Only downside is that because it's horse manure, I do get weeds coming up occasionally...cows are better at breaking down seeds, so I wish I had a cow! But I don't really have the room for one and I don't think my zoning allows for it.
I wish i had a horse.Tryed to buy one that was worked by his owner but after i read more it would have been too dangerous for the horse to keep it on my land because i have bees and they are too sensitive to bees stings plus they slap the bees with theyr tails and that annoys the bees.The dung beetles are really fast to show up and break down the manure .We have them here too.

All the fruit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
    • Germany
    • View Profile
    • Youtube: all the fruit
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2019, 05:33:46 AM »
We also have dung beetles in Europe. But they are mostly small and live in the forests. When there is no dung they roll balls made of mushrooms.

In honour of Sterculius you could plant Sterculia = Java olive

https://youtu.be/t6xgKmDyXfg

Very ornamental tropical nutlets with an unique taste.

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2019, 06:06:01 AM »
We also have dung beetles in Europe. But they are mostly small and live in the forests. When there is no dung they roll balls made of mushrooms.

In honour of Sterculius you could plant Sterculia = Java olive

https://youtu.be/t6xgKmDyXfg

Very ornamental tropical nutlets with an unique taste.
Where i collect the manure ,the dry ones have houndreds of small ,1 cm long ,dung beetles.Those with beetles i consider them good for pots and allready aged.
I had a feeling you tryed the Sterculia allready  ;D.I ve read about that tree .

All the fruit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
    • Germany
    • View Profile
    • Youtube: all the fruit
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2019, 11:01:59 AM »
Yes, there are lots of Sterculia species in Asia. Very confusing. But not hardy enough for Romania.

Patanax

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 29
    • Austria, Zone 7a
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2019, 06:11:17 PM »
A similar walnut is planted at the Austropalm nursery in Guntramsdorf, south of Vienna. They don't seem to sell trees though, at least at the moment, and even if they did, their plants are very overpriced.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 06:13:14 PM by Patanax »

SoCal2warm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1077
    • zone 10 and zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2019, 08:43:32 PM »



got these from a guy in Ukraine

SeaWalnut

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Verry rare walnut
« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2019, 09:43:26 PM »



got these from a guy in Ukraine
Nice.Soak them in water for 2 days then keep in the fridge for 2-3 months in a plastig bag with moist paper.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers