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Author Topic: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.  (Read 423 times)

SeaWalnut

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Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« on: April 21, 2019, 11:13:21 PM »
I see this tree quite offten listed as edible but what parts of it its edible i dont know.I suspect the edible part its the nectar from the flowers in a similar way that sugar bushes are used.Maybe somebody that knows more about this will shed light on the edibility issue.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2019, 05:12:03 AM »
Seeds arrived from Patagonia.Gevuina Avellana ,the red nuts that look like Macadamia and Embothrium Coccineum ,the smaller seeds.Both are proteaceae.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2019, 05:29:50 AM »
Note: i dont sell them.

pvaldes

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Re: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2019, 04:11:14 PM »
After a spanish book, seeds are the edible part when cooked.

In any case I don't have direct experience with it, and those seeds could be from other species, so be careful.

Other uses: Has some healing effect, Spoons are made from its wood. Leaves are used as cattle fodder and eaten by deer, and flowers attract birds

A narrow tree that stands shadowed spots, fits in small spaces with a splendid massive floration in spring and a second floration in fall sometimes (less profuse). Just for the flower this jewel from the Antarctic flora would deserve a space.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2019, 04:39:23 PM by pvaldes »

SeaWalnut

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Re: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2019, 10:23:14 PM »
After a spanish book, seeds are the edible part when cooked.

In any case I don't have direct experience with it, and those seeds could be from other species, so be careful.

Other uses: Has some healing effect, Spoons are made from its wood. Leaves are used as cattle fodder and eaten by deer, and flowers attract birds

A narrow tree that stands shadowed spots, fits in small spaces with a splendid massive floration in spring and a second floration in fall sometimes (less profuse). Just for the flower this jewel from the Antarctic flora would deserve a space.
Just for the flowers il give them space on my land. I also have beehives and i think these trees produce a lot of nectar but i am not sure iet.I have a feeling its like Rewarewa from New Zealand wich is also a protaceae with similar flowers .Indigenous people from NZ shake the rewarewa flowers into a bucket and they drink the nectar they had collected.For bees to reach the nectar of Embothrium might be problematic because of the shape of the flower and bees might dissassemble the flowers just like they do to magnolia flowers to take the pollen( magnolias dont produce nectar,just pollen).Thx for explaining me from spanish language. Here is a link about Rewarewa flowers and their nectar collection.https://youtu.be/SK9u0MZA4B8
« Last Edit: May 28, 2019, 10:26:11 PM by SeaWalnut »

SeaWalnut

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Re: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2019, 09:00:52 PM »
After a month in the fridge i got good germination rate of Gevuina( the nut seeds), close to 100 percent.
Embothrium needs a little more time in the fridge but i still mannaged to get one seed without cold stratification at all( soaked in gibberellic acid ,500 ppm/24 hours).


SeaWalnut

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Re: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2019, 04:28:10 AM »
I got an idea on how to lower phosphorus for these protea plants.I will buy cheapest iron nails,wash them of oil and then i will mix them into the soil on the spot where il plant these trees.
The nails will rust and the rust will bind the phosphates really well .Ive used special rust pellets ( GFO) in the past to remove phosphates from water but GFO is expensive and its just rust after all.One kilo of nails costs just 1 euro.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Chile flame tree,Embothrium Coccineum,proteaceae.
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2019, 05:28:58 AM »
Great read about South American proteaceae.They tolerate a lot more phosphorus than proteaceae from Australia and South Africa.
South african ptotea grow well between 1-40 ppm P ,while the south americans do well between 63-951 ppm P.
The more tolerant proteaceae from South America are Embothrium and Lomatia Hirsuta,but especially Embothrium since it looses a lot of P when its shading its leaves so the colder the climate the more phosphorus resistance it has.
 Also found 2 practices to lower the phosphorus,one is to measure the P at 50 cm depth and at the surface.At depth it should be much lower and by tilling 50 cm deep the phosphorus gets ,,diluted,, in the soil.
The otther practice its to add aluminium sulphate,0,15 gr of AlSiO4 per each ppm of P that needs to be reduced.Aluminium binds the phosphate and its non toxic.Its verry similar to my method of using rust,iron oxide,basically does the same thing and its probably cheaper.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6030812/

 

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