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Author Topic: Role of 'terroir' in citrus flavor  (Read 372 times)

tve

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Role of 'terroir' in citrus flavor
« on: April 23, 2019, 01:19:57 AM »
I'm curious about what you all have noticed about the influence of the location where you grow citrus on its flavor.

My (home) orchard is in a borderline location in SoCal and my trees tend to be fairly stressed. Plus the soil is sandy and slightly alkaline. One of the results is a high level of acidity it seems and perhaps more intense flavor. Dunno...

Something I found striking is that I have had no luck finding a complement to my Bearss Lime tree. I have a Key Lime, but I would be incapable of distinguishing its fruit from the Bearss by taste. Maybe by scent, but I'm not sure. I suspect that if I could buy a ripe Key Lime coming from the Carribean it would be different. I also tried some Mexican Sweet limes but they just came out insipid. No acidity and no flavor, also not much sweetness. My Mexican friends who grew up with sweet limes tell me that what came off my trees ain't it. Well, the trees didn't get their native climate either...

When I read flavor comparisons between varieties I always wonder how much of that applies to my location...

Oolie

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Re: Role of 'terroir' in citrus flavor
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2019, 04:54:02 AM »
On the limes, I think you may want to try Sudachi, a Japanese citrus with acidity levels in the lime range, but a different flavor profile. It is used similarly.

On the role of different growing Climes, I have compared 'Washington' with established trees that are in a slightly more coastal valley, and ones growing in the foothills of SD county. The one growing in the foothills is not as well established (Sub 8'), and is in a well drained silty loam. It receives regular irrigation, and is a moderate producer of moderately sweet fruit.
The more coastal tree is in an inland valley, also on a slope, in the heaviest of clays, is well established (between 10' and 12'), receives no irrigation, and has exceptionally sweet fruit with an excellent acid balance.

I suspect that calcium is playing a role in this, and will experiment going forward.

tve

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Re: Role of 'terroir' in citrus flavor
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2019, 11:13:33 AM »
On the limes, I think you may want to try Sudachi, a Japanese citrus with acidity levels in the lime range, but a different flavor profile. It is used similarly.
Thanks for the tip! I'll see whether the CCPP offers it.

 

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