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Author Topic: Breeding: Mango pairings  (Read 990 times)

Mango_Seed

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Breeding: Mango pairings
« on: April 24, 2019, 12:52:19 AM »
I am interested in what varieties you would plant together in the interest of creating a new variety and why they are paired together?
« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 01:26:21 AM by Mango_Seed »

Squam256

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2019, 11:37:03 AM »
Ultra early season mangos with other regular early season varieties to get more spring fruit.

Late season  varieties with high quality MBBS/rot- resistant, mid-season cultivars:

Some examples-
Early season:
Edward x Dwarf Hawaiian (both early and excellent flavor. One has dwarf trait, other superior size and texture)
Rosa (super early season) x Dupuis Saigon (early, bbs/rot resistant, productive, excellent quality)

Late season:
Keitt (very late, productive) x Cac (outstanding flavor, production, disease resistance)
Beverly x Seacrest
Osteen x orange Sherbet

« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 11:44:09 AM by Squam256 »

behlgarden

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2019, 11:42:33 AM »
I am interested in what varieties you would plant together in the interest of creating a new variety and why they are paired together?

For hybrids, I would go with polyembriyonic varieties. Use the top 5. Lemon zest, peach cobbler, sweet tart, honey kiss, Pina colada, pineapple pleasure, CAC, etc. There will be one sprout out of all these that will be different from clones. That's the one you should be after. It's a 3-5 yr project but well worth it

I have lemon zest seedling that is 4 yr old, may bloom this year, ifruit was next to Maha chinok, and have coconut cream two seedlings that are in bloom now.

Future

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2019, 06:26:02 PM »
I am interested in what varieties you would plant together in the interest of creating a new variety and why they are paired together?

For hybrids, I would go with polyembriyonic varieties. Use the top 5. Lemon zest, peach cobbler, sweet tart, honey kiss, Pina colada, pineapple pleasure, CAC, etc. There will be one sprout out of all these that will be different from clones. That's the one you should be after. It's a 3-5 yr project but well worth it

I have lemon zest seedling that is 4 yr old, may bloom this year, ifruit was next to Maha chinok, and have coconut cream two seedlings that are in bloom now.

Behl- keen to hear how these do. The Zill seedling off types is the future.

JoeP450

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2019, 07:54:39 PM »
Think an improved ice cream mango is needed, the tree has a compact stature and growth habit, delicious tasting fruit, and in my yard flowers multiple times a year which would make it a good candidate to receive or donate pollen.....the main drawback is itís anthracnose magnet.... maybe coconut cream x ice cream or other mangos with disease resistance.

-joep450

Mango_Seed

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2019, 08:21:16 PM »
In the following video Gary Zill says his seedlings took more like 10 years to fruit.

Gary Zill's Mango Variety Development Project video on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Gz2kb6ihZ4
« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 08:43:57 PM by Mango_Seed »

Mango_Seed

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2019, 09:49:56 AM »

Mango_Seed

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2019, 10:58:45 AM »
The following document is called "The Need for Mango Breeding".

https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/1961-vol-74/371-374%20(STURROCK).pdf#search=%22mango%22

JF

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2019, 01:00:25 PM »
Iíve created 2 top tier selections from madame Francis and Juliette seeds which might have been crossed with LZ, or other Zill var that were a few feet away. They are both precocious and bloomed after two years....fruited on the third year.

Mango_Seed

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2019, 06:49:40 PM »
Can you predict if the offspring of two mangos will be monoembryonic or polyembryonic before crossing them? 

Oolie

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2019, 06:58:16 PM »
Can you predict if the offspring of two mangos will be monoembryonic or polyembryonic before crossing them?

You can. Polyembryony is a dominant gene, therefore if neither parent is poly, then you will not get a poly seedling.

That said if both parents only carry one poly dominant gene and a mono recessive, then 25% of the offspring will be mono if the traditional pea-type inheritance applies.

I also have read previously about Ice Cream needing to be improved. Seems like a good candidate.

Tropicdude

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2019, 12:09:07 AM »
I think that back yard growers have tons of options to choose from, just look at how many mango aficionados complain of not having enough room for that new variety.

Where I think breeding work needs to be done is in commercial varieties.  the pickings are slim in this area.

What's needed?   
* A fruit that can be picked mature green,  but ripen perfectly,  after 2 weeks.
* Firm and thick skinned to for shipping.   
* looks nice , ( colors sell,  think of those poor souls that mistakenly select the beautiful Tommy Atkins over a greenish yellow Kiett )
* Disease resistant
* Productive, and reliable.  ( Not so dependent on climate triggers to know when to flower )
* Smaller tree, good for high density farms, and easy harvesting.
* Taste like a top tier mango
* 100% fiberless with dark orange flesh

So if I had to select which fruit to get traits from.

Kiett :  for its productivity,  disease resistance, shelf life and shipping ability.   but lacks color and quality of fruit (flavor and texture ) can be improved on.
Tommy Atkins:  for all it's commercial traits,  and color.

once you have this you "pair" it with something that will improve the fruit quality.

many of the top tier mangoes , seem to be very finicky into picking times or that narrow window of perfect ripeness.  for someone that has a tree in their back yard,  this is not much of a problem,  but having fruit that has a longer shelf life is an attractive trait even for backyard growers.   

for home growers, I think the following traits should be focused on by breeders:
* Disease resistance
* Consistency in quality and production each year ( not so sensitive to climate such as,  for example Glenn, Angie etc )
* Naturally dwarf
* Long shelf life and forgiving in when you pick them.
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

skhan

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Re: Breeding: Mango pairings
« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2019, 08:23:03 AM »
I think that back yard growers have tons of options to choose from, just look at how many mango aficionados complain of not having enough room for that new variety.

Where I think breeding work needs to be done is in commercial varieties.  the pickings are slim in this area.

What's needed?   
* A fruit that can be picked mature green,  but ripen perfectly,  after 2 weeks.
* Firm and thick skinned to for shipping.   
* looks nice , ( colors sell,  think of those poor souls that mistakenly select the beautiful Tommy Atkins over a greenish yellow Kiett )
* Disease resistant
* Productive, and reliable.  ( Not so dependent on climate triggers to know when to flower )
* Smaller tree, good for high density farms, and easy harvesting.
* Taste like a top tier mango
* 100% fiberless with dark orange flesh

So if I had to select which fruit to get traits from.

Kiett :  for its productivity,  disease resistance, shelf life and shipping ability.   but lacks color and quality of fruit (flavor and texture ) can be improved on.
Tommy Atkins:  for all it's commercial traits,  and color.

once you have this you "pair" it with something that will improve the fruit quality.

many of the top tier mangoes , seem to be very finicky into picking times or that narrow window of perfect ripeness.  for someone that has a tree in their back yard,  this is not much of a problem,  but having fruit that has a longer shelf life is an attractive trait even for backyard growers.   

for home growers, I think the following traits should be focused on by breeders:
* Disease resistance
* Consistency in quality and production each year ( not so sensitive to climate such as,  for example Glenn, Angie etc )
* Naturally dwarf
* Long shelf life and forgiving in when you pick them.

I tend to agree.
Right now we have a pretty good selection geared mostly to the enthusiast homeowner, but we can always improve.
For the homeowner, I'd think extending the season and increasing disease resistance would be the focus.
Don't think extended seasons on one tree will be that useful for commercial groves.

Have you tried Delores and Nancy?
From my experience, Edgar, Zinc, and Cac seem to hold pretty well on the counter and are pretty forgiving in terms of picking time
Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2019

 

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