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Author Topic: Giant Ameiva Lizards  (Read 2450 times)

johnb51

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Giant Ameiva Lizards
« on: April 30, 2019, 02:33:06 PM »
Does any other city besides Deerfield Beach have an ameiva lizard infestation?  I've read where these pet store lizards were turned loose by some idiot pet owners, and now in my section of DB, the Cove, they are even more prevalent than iguanas.  What they do is dig holes throughout your garden, especially in your flower beds.  They do this on a daily basis.
John

roblack

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2019, 04:16:40 PM »
They are definitely in the Miami area. Have seen them in Hialeah.

Dimitry Fisher

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2019, 04:24:36 PM »
Iguanas are herbivores (eat & damage plants).  Ameivas are predators (eat insects, spiders, small rodents, etc.) so they may actually be doing more good than harm.  How bad is their digging habit?   Can you set up a place (a log or some cover) for them to burrow under, so they don't do as much damage digging around?  Ameivas are relatives of tegus, they are relatively smart. YMMV, obviously :)

roblack

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2019, 04:56:01 PM »
If you can catch one, send it to me. My kids love em! Fast little critters, hard to catch.

gnappi

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2019, 05:35:08 PM »
Does any other city besides Deerfield Beach have an ameiva lizard infestation?  I've read where these pet store lizards were turned loose by some idiot pet owners, and now in my section of DB, the Cove, they are even more prevalent than iguanas.  What they do is dig holes throughout your garden, especially in your flower beds.  They do this on a daily basis.

Why in the world does our Government allow exotic pets to be imported and sold?
Regards,

   Gary

Dimitry Fisher

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2019, 05:39:31 PM »
> Why in the world does our Government allow exotic pets to be imported and sold?

For the same reason that it allows exotic fruit seeds to be imported and sold :)

Johnny Redland

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2019, 05:48:43 PM »
Here’s one I caught in my yard last week, just for a photo op




johnb51

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2019, 09:02:48 PM »
Here’s one I caught in my yard last week, just for a photo op



How did you manage to catch it?  They're lightning fast.  The damage they do is that if you plant flowers they love to dig at the base of the plants, and they return day after day to do the same thing.  I wouldn't mind it if they just dug holes around the fruit trees.  But they do make your whole garden look like sh*t!
« Last Edit: April 30, 2019, 09:04:55 PM by johnb51 »
John

Johnny Redland

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2019, 09:32:30 PM »
The house is still under construction so we have a lot of building materials laying around. He went under a tarp and thought he was hidden, so I just had to be quick and sandwich him between the tarp and the ground with one hand while I reached under and grabbed him with the other. Just lucky I guess. I have like 6 or 7 species of “large” exotic lizards that frequent my property. It’s pretty cool actually. But I can understand the frustration from the damage they cause

jmart777

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2019, 03:44:36 AM »
Try catching the lizards using the lizard leash method.  We use it for our smaller lizards out here. Obviously the bigger lizards will just bust through the blade of grass. 

https://imgur.com/gallery/CcyJ4


gnappi

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2019, 08:08:05 AM »
> Why in the world does our Government allow exotic pets to be imported and sold?

For the same reason that it allows exotic fruit seeds to be imported and sold :)

Yeah but if exotic trees run wild they can be located, and controlled... fish and reptiles likely will never be controlled.

Regards,

   Gary

johnb51

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2019, 08:58:16 AM »
> Why in the world does our Government allow exotic pets to be imported and sold?

For the same reason that it allows exotic fruit seeds to be imported and sold :)

Yeah but if exotic trees run wild they can be located, and controlled... fish and reptiles likely will never be controlled.
I don't know about that, Gary.  We're still fighting Australian pine (casuarina) and Brazilian pepper in Florida, and historically in California all the native, fire-resistant grasses were replaced by what the Spanish brought with them.
John

johnb51

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2019, 09:04:43 AM »
The house is still under construction so we have a lot of building materials laying around. He went under a tarp and thought he was hidden, so I just had to be quick and sandwich him between the tarp and the ground with one hand while I reached under and grabbed him with the other. Just lucky I guess. I have like 6 or 7 species of “large” exotic lizards that frequent my property. It’s pretty cool actually. But I can understand the frustration from the damage they cause
Every now and then I'm able to force one onto my porch which runs lengthwise behind two flower beds and corner him.  Then it's good-bye, Mr. Lizard!  (This is probably illegal, like killing iguanas.)  Here's the scoop on the Burmese python in the Everglades: https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/united-states/florida/stories-in-florida/stopping-a-burmese-python-invasion/?src3=e.gp.local.May2019.Florida
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 09:10:24 AM by johnb51 »
John

savemejebus

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2019, 10:29:22 AM »
Quote from: johnb51
(This is probably illegal, like killing iguanas.) 

If killing iguanas is wrong, I don't want to be right.

In all seriousness, that must be city specific because, as far as I know, I'm within my rights to stand my ground (with an air rifle) in Coral Springs. Not sure if the neighbors have called 911 on the crazy guy with a big rifle crawling through his yard.

Sleepdoc

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2019, 11:09:33 AM »
They are all over my yard.  They definitely look pretty cool , and so far haven’t bothered me much.  They do dig some holes but as far as I can tell, they have not had an impact on my fruit trees.

pvaldes

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2019, 05:27:10 PM »
If there is an impact on fruit trees from an animal eating insects, ants and rodents could easily be a positive impact. Environmental impact can be another history

If you don't want it digging the soil, provide some fallen logs or rocks in another area, and they probably will move to the new area, or make their nests in a different place.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 05:30:02 PM by pvaldes »

Dimitry Fisher

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2019, 06:13:27 PM »
In California you need fishing license to take reptiles O_O

I have a ton of western fence lizards in my backyard - those are native (and awesome to watch).  That, and an occasional alligator lizard.  I've rescued lizards in the past, they're easy to rehabilitate (and release, if they're native).  No invasive reptiles here so far, but it's probably a question of time.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 06:19:29 PM by Dimitry Fisher »

pineislander

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2019, 08:26:58 PM »
Try catching the lizards using the lizard leash method.  We use it for our smaller lizards out here. Obviously the bigger lizards will just bust through the blade of grass. 

https://imgur.com/gallery/CcyJ4
yes, they eat lizards frequently in Vietnam I've seen how they use the noose they seem unaware of a thin line on a long pole.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkcOpPRfeug

Daintree

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2019, 08:47:27 PM »
Very cool lizard!  What is not cool are the stupid humans who are contributing to the invasive species problem by turning their pets loose!

I am a big reptile fan!  I got a picture of this beauty in its natural habitat in Santa Marta Colombia. It's a blue, or dusky, ameiva. And yeah, it was FAST. A local said they call them Jungle Runners.



SeaWalnut

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #19 on: May 01, 2019, 11:09:43 PM »
I am a professional ecologist here ( like those from EPA used to be) and what amazes me at USA its that they hate carps wich are the most eco friendly possible animal in the world wich eats algae to prevent eutrophisation and protects all native species and ecosystems.So in USA they hate carps but ive seen a fisherman on youtube that caught a big snakehead fish in Florida and he released it back saying thats an valuable fish without knowing what damage can do to enviroment such a predatory fish.
EDIT: and out of curiosity,my nickname,the seawalnut,its from a ctenophore( a comb jellyfish) wich its the animal that probably made.the biggest ecological dissaster in known history.It almost wiped out all the fauna from the Black sea a few decades ago.Now its under control.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 11:16:01 PM by SeaWalnut »

Mando408

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2019, 12:13:54 AM »
Very cool lizard!  What is not cool are the stupid humans who are contributing to the invasive species problem by turning their pets loose!

I am a big reptile fan!  I got a picture of this beauty in its natural habitat in Santa Marta Colombia. It's a blue, or dusky, ameiva. And yeah, it was FAST. A local said they call them Jungle Runners.



Stupid people screw up a lot of things for everybody, some asshole brought acp and hlb to Florida at one time and now every citrus growing state in the US has to deal with that crap. F*** that guy more than any lizard.

Mando408

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2019, 12:19:56 AM »
I am a professional ecologist here ( like those from EPA used to be) and what amazes me at USA its that they hate carps wich are the most eco friendly possible animal in the world wich eats algae to prevent eutrophisation and protects all native species and ecosystems.So in USA they hate carps but ive seen a fisherman on youtube that caught a big snakehead fish in Florida and he released it back saying thats an valuable fish without knowing what damage can do to enviroment such a predatory fish.
EDIT: and out of curiosity,my nickname,the seawalnut,its from a ctenophore( a comb jellyfish) wich its the animal that probably made.the biggest ecological dissaster in known history.It almost wiped out all the fauna from the Black sea a few decades ago.Now its under control.

Maybe in Romania, friend but here they do way more damage than good. As for the youtube guy, I wouldn't be surprised if it was that catchum guy from Florida who ALWAYS catches invasive animals and then releases them right after, either not knowing or caring that it's illegal.

sahai1

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2019, 01:00:49 AM »
Glue mats would likely work if you needed to trap them.  Can you eat them or turn them into dog treats?  Wonder if they are burrowing to find grubs or other insects, or if they are making homes.  If they are climbing lizards they might be doing a great deal of good to balance out insect populations that could destroy your trees.

Or your area might be undergoing a huge ecological disaster, in that case it is your duty to round up whole neighborhood to eradicate these things while you still have a chance. 


Alejandro45

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2019, 10:10:53 AM »
I waited a bit to respond to this conversation just to gather my thoughts since I am a lover of all things plants and animals.

 I think we can all agree that we “mankind” are the biggest ecological disaster this world has and will ever face. Every time we clear a plot of land and build a house we cleared the native hammocks, grasses, birds and insects that occupy this space. Clearing yards to have one species of grass and a couple other trees that are not native does next to nothing for the native wildlife. Some native species are habitat specialist and will not thrive unless they have their native soils,plants, microclimate, etc. Invasive” plants and animals are just generalist species of plants and animals in their native range, and all they can be blamed for is being able to survive our influences on the terrain and are able to live around us or are better adapted for extreme weather conditions “droughts, floods, fires”.

For example here in south Florida almost every back yard has black racers. A native harmless thin black snake that is a generalist able to survive and establish itself were man has altered the habitat to the point of being a suburban community. Now take the eastern indigo snake the largest snakes in the United States. They have a huge range and cover multiple habitat types hammocks, parries, pinewoods, sand ridges and even barrier islands. But they are the first to go when we terraform the land, unable to survive alongside urban human habitation.

I used to work down in the Keys for the fire department and people think there is going to be a vast extinction of the endangered mammals and birds because they found Burmese pythons with key largo wood rats in their digestive tract. I can’t understand why they would think that. Is it because the news and social media told them? Roads as a whole kill far more animals off any kind, and when we look at cats a far more successful predator that must kill and eat way more than any python can just because they have a mammalian metabolism. Cats have a proven track record for causing extinction on islands and yet they allowed to run free and even have a spay/neuter release program?! I mean what the heck? Kill pythons onsite but catch and release cats. How equal ::)

About snakeheads. This is just anecdotal but they are as thick as mud in the canal behind my house. And yet at the same time I can easily pull out just as many native bass on the right bait and bait fish with a cast net. A guy I work with runs a fishing charter in lake Ida ground zero for the invasive clown knifefish. Again just anecdotal but I did ask did the clowns decimate the baitfish or bass population? Not really any difference according to him. At fist he was worried the baitfish were going to be gone and the bass were going to decline or stay small from lack of food but nope the fishing is good and the bass eat the fry knife fish no problem.

In the end John my friend you should remove them if they are a disturbance to you. You can put minnow traps along the fence and side of your house. They will get caught just by walking in them. Then you can do what you must. I will not think any different of you. But are they infesting your area or just trying to survive and reproduce? The end goal for all things living. I believe they are just taking place of the six lined race runner a native lizard from a similar genus that faced oblivion when mass urbanization took hold of South Florida. You can go see those in the Sugar sand park.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2019, 07:24:21 PM »


Maybe in Romania, friend but here they do way more damage than good. As for the youtube guy, I wouldn't be surprised if it was that catchum guy from Florida who ALWAYS catches invasive animals and then releases them right after, either not knowing or caring that it's illegal.
[/quote] Youve been told a lie,the carps,especially the flying ones are peacefull phytoplancton eaters that feed like whales.They clean the excess algae thats caused by phosphorus build up in the lakes from,sewage,detergents and agricultural runoff and they trap the phosphorus into theyr bones as calcium phosphate wich its not soluble in water .Phosphorus unlike nitrogen builds up in the lakes and doesnt get released into the atmosphere .But the algae,because they arent plants,they only need phosphorus and a carbon source to bloom and the nitrogen they take it directly from air.Carps are beneficial like honey bees,you can never have enough of them and it doesnt matters if you eat them or if they die of old age,because they have trapped the phosphorus.I know the carps problem in the US better than you and the big ecological disaster is that you didnt added carps in time to prevent eutrophisation like you have in lake Erie or lake Okechobee.Also because of the lack of carps you got zebra mussels infestations.Both the flying carp and zebra mussels eat algae but the difference is that the carps trap the main culprit of the eutrophisation,the phosphorus,into theyr bones ,while zebra mussels dont because theyr shells are made of calcium carbonate not calcium phosphate .
The snakeheads are opposite to carps and they destroy ecosystem.If you say you have snakeheads as thick as mud in your lake and that they dont do any harm to the ecosystem,i would ask you what do you think they eat?
« Last Edit: May 02, 2019, 07:30:16 PM by SeaWalnut »

 

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