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Author Topic: Bark inversion tutorial  (Read 527 times)

JoeReal

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #25 on: May 15, 2019, 10:33:23 AM »
Joe, I take it that the bark inversion technique is used mostly on seedling trees.  I guess it could also be used on grafted trees to keep them shorter.  I have a Red Clementine seedling with a trunk diameter of approximately 1/4 inch.  Can the bark inversion be done on a trunk that small?  I thinking of doing the inversion to reduce the time of flowering.

Am doing it on my grafted trees as well, same effect, unless the rootstock is ultradwarfing, then very little effect. I have done it small calipers like 1/4" but you'll need the band around it to be smaller also.

brian

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2019, 04:29:13 PM »
I just tried it on a tree with fresh new growth but the bark band started breaking into pieces as I was removing it so I stopped 1/3 of the way through and put the pieces back.  I feel like the bark on my trees is never slipping enough to graft. 

Laaz

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #27 on: May 15, 2019, 05:03:15 PM »
When you see new growth the bark is slipping...

shaneatwell

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #28 on: May 15, 2019, 06:37:26 PM »
I was just going to ask about timing. Do it when bark is slipping?
Shane

Laaz

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #29 on: May 15, 2019, 06:51:28 PM »
Yes.

shaneatwell

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #30 on: May 16, 2019, 11:47:11 AM »
I did a rose apple, wax jambu, white sapote and key apple last night. Tried Java Plum too, but could not find edge of bark. It was like cutting into a watermelon.

Will keep y'all updated.
Shane

JoeReal

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #31 on: May 16, 2019, 12:51:26 PM »
I just tried it on a tree with fresh new growth but the bark band started breaking into pieces as I was removing it so I stopped 1/3 of the way through and put the pieces back.  I feel like the bark on my trees is never slipping enough to graft.

It would still have an effect, although mild. The scoring and the 1/3 removal and putting back would be equal to mild girdling technique.

John Smith

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Re: Bark inversion tutorial
« Reply #32 on: May 17, 2019, 07:16:39 PM »
as a novice grafter, I find this extremely interesting.
in the world of Bonsai, to suppress the growth of fast
growing fruit trees is pretty difficult.

Joe - is there a particular time of year that the Bark Inversion
would be more successful than other times of the year ??
I have a nice Loquat I want to "try" to maintain at about 6ft tall.

thanks for sharing this !

and - Sylvain thank you for the time you took to make the PDF !!
.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2019, 06:04:21 PM by John Smith »
-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

 

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