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Author Topic: Poncirus  (Read 360 times)

Bomand

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Poncirus
« on: May 19, 2019, 08:59:02 PM »
In the woods this weekend I came upon a grove of poncirus. I spent some time looking for variations/mutations. Nothing of real intetest except part of the grove had large fruit. I know that this is an indication that these bloomed early. They were about six feet tall. I could not stand it...got my shovel out and dug up 4 of them, burlaped the roots and hauled them to the truck. Went home potted them in 25 gallon pots, fertilized and sprayed them good. Watered them down. The fruit will probably fall due to transplant shock but next year I should be flush with seed. I am certain that I have a problem....can not stand to leave it in the woods......

SoCal2warm

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Re: Poncirus
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2019, 02:07:53 AM »
I wonder if it could be possible to cause genetic introgression into the naturalized poncirus genepool. Possibly by pollinating a few of the flowers with citrangequat pollen. You would think that over the long-term animals might select for the ones with better taste.

Bomand

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Re: Poncirus
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2019, 08:06:24 AM »
That might be a possibility. I have tried pollenating poncirus flowers with pllen from other citrus but have not left the blossom or fruit uncovered or left fruit on the tree to see that natrual selection by wildlife takes place. I think this would be a good test.

Bomand

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Re: Poncirus
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2019, 08:15:26 AM »
I did plant two kumquat trees in a grove of poncirus. As quick, and sometimes before the kumquats ripened the wildlife had their wY with them while the poncirus fruit remained untouched.....?????????

mikkel

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Re: Poncirus
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2019, 08:40:55 AM »
Nice thought, I thought about it too.
I think pollinating flowers in the wild is a gamble. Fruits taste the same and initially have no advantage.
It would be easier to plant a hybrid aside. More fruit, more chance of distribution by animals, perhaps cross-pollination, but it still takes generations.
Malus sieversii is said to have been developed by bears through natural selection. If so, then it still took thousands of years.

There might be already hybrids in nature. I've never been to the USA and I can't judge it. But I got seedlings from the wild when it was still legal. It turned out that they were hybrids.

Just a thought game:
I wonder whether the typical Poncirus taste could be advantageous in nature? If animals prefer citrus fruits, as you observe, there should be seedlings around citrus plantations (especially some time ago when seedless varieties were not so common). Not necessarily much, but there should be. If there are none, the seeds seem to have some disadvantage. Maybe animals eat the seeds with them.


Bomand

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Re: Poncirus
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2019, 08:47:24 AM »
Some wildlife does eat the seeds. As a general rule....I find that not many species enjoy poncirus. They partake as a last resort. While many enjoy a good citrus and sometimes opt for citrus over other food sources.

Laaz

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Re: Poncirus
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2019, 08:54:04 AM »
It would have to be a critter with no taste buds. The trifoliata that falls from my tree sprouts in clumps where the fruit fell in the fall, nothing will touch it. We have coons, possums & armadillos around & they never touch the poncirus. They will however eat the swingle fruit if I don't collect it quickly. The sweet citrus if left on the tree too long is first attacked by birds which peck holes in the  fruit. I have even witnessed humming birds feeding on hanging fruit.

mikkel

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Re: Poncirus
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2019, 09:02:28 AM »
The trifoliata that falls from my tree sprouts in clumps where the fruit fell in the fall, nothing will touch it. We have coons, possums & armadillos around & they never touch the poncirus.

This might be the advantage of Poncirus tastes.... when seen from the Poncirus point of view.

 

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