Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Bael Fruit  (Read 2529 times)

RodneyS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 595
  • Cerritos, CA (Zone 11a)
    • View Profile
Bael Fruit
« on: November 03, 2012, 03:23:21 PM »
Tried a Bael fruit drink at a local Thai restaurant yesterday and enjoyed it immensely.  Quite refreshing.

I've heard the tree tolerates a wide range of temps & soils.  Does anyone grow Bael fruit?

FlyingFoxFruits

  • Prince of Plinia
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12378
  • www.FlyingFoxFruits.com
    • USA, FEMA Region IV, FL Zone 9a
    • View Profile
    • Flying Fox Fruits
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2012, 03:52:30 PM »
I've got a bunch.

a few varieties from fruit and spice park...one tasted the best, so I marked it as better tasting.

there are many variations, some are much better tasting than others...seems like the more elongated fruits are harder to find and tastier.

to me it taste like a citrus, bubble gum, tamarind.

very nice.

nullzero

  • Zone 10a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3548
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2012, 04:22:18 PM »
Sounds very interesting, another one I want to grow lol.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

FloridaGreenMan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1400
  • Coral Springs FL Zone 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2012, 04:29:16 PM »
Here's a photo of the one from the Fruit & Spice Pk. The shell is as hard as wood. No insect damage ever! Grows and fruits well in SFLA  but very few grow it..... 
   

FloridaGreenMan

nullzero

  • Zone 10a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3548
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2012, 05:20:29 PM »
Here's a photo of the one from the Fruit & Spice Pk. The shell is as hard as wood. No insect damage ever! Grows and fruits well in SFLA  but very few grow it..... 
   



Nice photo, how would you rate the fruit?
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

Felipe

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1340
    • Canary Islands, Spain - 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2012, 07:10:22 PM »
I'm growing one seedling. So far, it behaves more or less like any other citrus tree; it likes acidic soil and fertilizer and heat. No idea about cold tollerance... I hope it doesn't take too long to fruit...  ::)

FloridaGreenMan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1400
  • Coral Springs FL Zone 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2012, 07:39:34 PM »
Here's a photo of the one from the Fruit & Spice Pk. The shell is as hard as wood. No insect damage ever! Grows and fruits well in SFLA  but very few grow it..... 
   



Nice photo, how would you rate the fruit?


It tasted like a dried citrus-fig combination.  OK but not really that good. I would not grow the tree.

FloridaGreenMan

FlyingFoxFruits

  • Prince of Plinia
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12378
  • www.FlyingFoxFruits.com
    • USA, FEMA Region IV, FL Zone 9a
    • View Profile
    • Flying Fox Fruits
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2012, 08:54:55 PM »
Noel,

Some varieties taste much better than the one in the photo (so I've heard).

They aren't as commonly grown in FL, as the round type that you photoed.

Matter of fact, I couldn't find such a tree a fruit and spice park, and I wouldn't be surprised if it's a real rarity outside of it's native range (Asia/India?)

here is an excerpt referring to a superior cultivar named Mitzapuri, from Fruits of Warm Climates, that gives me hope.

"Rated the best was 'Mitzapuri', with very thin rind, breakable with slight pressure of the thumb, pulp of fine texture, free of gum, of excellent flavor, and containing few seeds."


Here's a photo of the one from the Fruit & Spice Pk. The shell is as hard as wood. No insect damage ever! Grows and fruits well in SFLA  but very few grow it..... 
   



Nice photo, how would you rate the fruit?


It tasted like a dried citrus-fig combination.  OK but not really that good. I would not grow the tree.



FloridaGreenMan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1400
  • Coral Springs FL Zone 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2012, 09:34:56 PM »
The fruit is popular for religious ceremonies in India. There must be some good eating varieties out there. Very few fruiting trees in the uSA.
FloridaGreenMan

tabbydan

  • Washington DC area
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 452
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2012, 10:40:48 PM »
Bael fruit can be eaten in a variety of stages: unripe, ripe, preserved.

The flavor profiles for both unripe and ripe are different, ripe seems less aromatic and complex but sweeter and with very little acidity.

Dried is typically used for tea and other beverages.

I think Bael fruit is quite a nice citrus relative.  I am trying to grow it.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

nullzero

  • Zone 10a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3548
    • View Profile
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2012, 01:05:18 AM »
From online sources, it states the young leaves and shoots are edible as well. Always nice to have a plant with multiple parts that are edible.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15546
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Bael Fruit
« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2012, 02:33:01 AM »
The fruit is popular for religious ceremonies in India. There must be some good eating varieties out there. Very few fruiting trees in the uSA.

You see the bael fruit here in India being sold in front of Shiva temples. It is used as a food offering in the temples. In India the fruit is used mostly as a medicinal. It's a great medicine for serious stomach ailments. Most of the bael fruits here are round shaped. In Thailand i've seen the elongated types which are much larger. It seems the fruits are more widely used in Thailand in drinks. They make good smoothies with them. The liquid inside is very viscous...similar to consistency of honey. I have a tree growing in Hawaii. It has sharp spines and is slow growing. The main challenge has been to keep slugs off the tree. They really like to chew young seedlings.
Oscar

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers