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Author Topic: Alano sapodilla pruning advice  (Read 585 times)

Vince2543

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Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« on: June 05, 2019, 12:35:15 AM »
Hi everyone.  First post please forgive me for any grammatical errors.  Fat fingers on a small iPhone is not the best combinations.

I just recently purchase a Alano Sapodilla.  Didnít notice until I got home that one of the branches has a pretty narrow crotch.  I included some photos of the front of the tree and back for everyones opinion and or recommendation.  Is this something of concern.  Should I cut off now or donít worry about it. 

With how the tree looks any pruning advise?

Thank you for everyoneís help.

Vince

Sorry I forgot to mention.  The nursery owner recommended not planting into the ground yet due to them just re-potting to a larger container just in the last 1-2 weeks.  I was thinking just wait until spring of next year to plant rather than planting in ground during the summer.






« Last Edit: June 06, 2019, 12:46:33 AM by Vince2543 »

BonsaiBeast

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2019, 01:15:45 AM »
This is just my opinion, but if it were my tree, I would not prune any branches until it has established. The only work before planting would be to uncircle the roots. That branch also appears to be just a little bit off of a direct crotch (if that makes sense).

Also, make sure to untie that green tape that created the narrow crotch to begin with.

But all in all, I would not be too worried about it. Prune down the road if it becomes an issue.

waxy

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2019, 01:45:35 AM »
I had a similar problem with my Alano in the past.
I just pruned the sides and let the center grow.

As it matures, the top branches become thicker and stretch out more, if you're looking for height.
If you leave the growth that low, your tree will remain a dwarf since all the energy is diverted evenly.

Such a healthy looking tree, I'd leave it and perhaps search for another tree that is taller?
A single branched tree should be a great start, then it'll start to grow more uniform as it matures.

Vince2543

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2019, 02:33:38 AM »
This is just my opinion, but if it were my tree, I would not prune any branches until it has established. The only work before planting would be to uncircle the roots. That branch also appears to be just a little bit off of a direct crotch (if that makes sense).

Also, make sure to untie that green tape that created the narrow crotch to begin with.

But all in all, I would not be too worried about it. Prune down the road if it becomes an issue.

Thank you bonsaibeast. The Alano was a Fatherís Day gift from my two little boys.  The owner at the nursery recommended I dont plant in ground for a few months as they just reported the tree to the current container.  I donít have have any room at the moment and will need to remove a small in ground Meyer lemon to put this Alano in.

Vince2543

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2019, 02:40:24 AM »
I had a similar problem with my Alano in the past.
I just pruned the sides and let the center grow.

As it matures, the top branches become thicker and stretch out more, if you're looking for height.
If you leave the growth that low, your tree will remain a dwarf since all the energy is diverted evenly.

Such a healthy looking tree, I'd leave it and perhaps search for another tree that is taller?
A single branched tree should be a great start, then it'll start to grow more uniform as it matures.

Thanks waxy.  The tree does look really healthy.  It was a father day gift from my two little boys so they watch it everyday waiting for a fruit to grow.  I told them we going to have to be very very patient. :)

When you mention prune the sides and to allow the central leader to grow do you mean maintain the sides at a shorter length or cut them off?

How is your Alano?  Would you mind sending me some photos of it.

Thank you

Cookie Monster

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2019, 09:34:35 AM »
Definitely leave that branch until the tree is well established (a few years), at which point you can either leave it or prune it (along with its sibling on the other side) depending on how you want the final tree to look.

You could remove that green tape and gradually open it up... or just not worry about it.
Jeff  :-)

Vince2543

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2019, 01:17:00 PM »
Definitely leave that branch until the tree is well established (a few years), at which point you can either leave it or prune it (along with its sibling on the other side) depending on how you want the final tree to look.

You could remove that green tape and gradually open it up... or just not worry about it.

Thank you Jeff,

In your opinion what would be the best course of action to grow this alano to a large upright tree.  My hopeful goal would be for this Alano to be 10-15 feet tall in 5+ years or however long it needs to get there. 

Waxy mentioned above that the tree may remained small or dwarfed if left unpruned due to the energy being shared among the branches and not more to the center leader.

your opinion and others would be very much appreciated.

Sorry I forgot to mention.  The nursery owner recommended not planting into the ground yet due to them just re-potting to a larger container just in the last 1-2 weeks.  I was thinking just wait until spring of next year to plant rather than planting in ground during the summer.

Vince
« Last Edit: June 05, 2019, 01:21:45 PM by Vince2543 »

Cookie Monster

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2019, 04:29:15 PM »
Saps are really slow growers, even here in FL, where trees pretty much fly out of the ground. They do seem to tolerate salt, so I tend to overload them with nitrogen to push them along (and to get big harvests :D). Hence, 5 years to that height might not be realistic? It took my alano 4 - 5 years to get to 10 feet, and we have somewhere around 3x the "heat hours" (forget the term) you guys get.

Cutting side branches to encourage height is not necessarily a solution to pushing vertical growth. Those side branches do 2 things in your favor:

 - They help to thicken the trunk, which then permits the tree to support vertical growth.
 - They add photosynthesis, allowing the tree to grow faster.

Saps tend towards vertical growth, so you shouldn't really need to do much in the way of pruning of undergrowth. Eventually those branches will get shaded out as the upper canopy develops, at which point you would want to cut them.

As far as planting it out -- if it were me, I'd go ahead and plant it. Even if the soil falls apart, that will give you an opportrunity to inspect he root system and cut any circling roots (very important for long term stablishment).

Keep it well fertilized with plenty of nitrogen in a slow release form.

Definitely leave that branch until the tree is well established (a few years), at which point you can either leave it or prune it (along with its sibling on the other side) depending on how you want the final tree to look.

You could remove that green tape and gradually open it up... or just not worry about it.

Thank you Jeff,

In your opinion what would be the best course of action to grow this alano to a large upright tree.  My hopeful goal would be for this Alano to be 10-15 feet tall in 5+ years or however long it needs to get there. 

Waxy mentioned above that the tree may remained small or dwarfed if left unpruned due to the energy being shared among the branches and not more to the center leader.

your opinion and others would be very much appreciated.

Sorry I forgot to mention.  The nursery owner recommended not planting into the ground yet due to them just re-potting to a larger container just in the last 1-2 weeks.  I was thinking just wait until spring of next year to plant rather than planting in ground during the summer.

Vince
Jeff  :-)

Vince2543

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2019, 05:52:51 PM »
Jeff,

Thank you again.  I think I understand the gist of it much better now. 

- Ok, so plant the tree inspect roots (if circling cut or free it up)
- Dont worry about any branch cutting until the tree is larger and those branches are shaded out or is too low to the ground.
- Fertilize with slow release nitrogen

Thanks again for your help

Vince

Saps are really slow growers, even here in FL, where trees pretty much fly out of the ground. They do seem to tolerate salt, so I tend to overload them with nitrogen to push them along (and to get big harvests :D). Hence, 5 years to that height might not be realistic? It took my alano 4 - 5 years to get to 10 feet, and we have somewhere around 3x the "heat hours" (forget the term) you guys get.

Cutting side branches to encourage height is not necessarily a solution to pushing vertical growth. Those side branches do 2 things in your favor:

 - They help to thicken the trunk, which then permits the tree to support vertical growth.
 - They add photosynthesis, allowing the tree to grow faster.

Saps tend towards vertical growth, so you shouldn't really need to do much in the way of pruning of undergrowth. Eventually those branches will get shaded out as the upper canopy develops, at which point you would want to cut them.

As far as planting it out -- if it were me, I'd go ahead and plant it. Even if the soil falls apart, that will give you an opportrunity to inspect he root system and cut any circling roots (very important for long term stablishment).

Keep it well fertilized with plenty of nitrogen in a slow release form.

Definitely leave that branch until the tree is well established (a few years), at which point you can either leave it or prune it (along with its sibling on the other side) depending on how you want the final tree to look.

You could remove that green tape and gradually open it up... or just not worry about it.

Thank you Jeff,

In your opinion what would be the best course of action to grow this alano to a large upright tree.  My hopeful goal would be for this Alano to be 10-15 feet tall in 5+ years or however long it needs to get there. 

Waxy mentioned above that the tree may remained small or dwarfed if left unpruned due to the energy being shared among the branches and not more to the center leader.

your opinion and others would be very much appreciated.

Sorry I forgot to mention.  The nursery owner recommended not planting into the ground yet due to them just re-potting to a larger container just in the last 1-2 weeks.  I was thinking just wait until spring of next year to plant rather than planting in ground during the summer.

Vince

waxy

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2019, 05:46:30 PM »
I had a similar problem with my Alano in the past.
I just pruned the sides and let the center grow.

As it matures, the top branches become thicker and stretch out more, if you're looking for height.
If you leave the growth that low, your tree will remain a dwarf since all the energy is diverted evenly.

Such a healthy looking tree, I'd leave it and perhaps search for another tree that is taller?
A single branched tree should be a great start, then it'll start to grow more uniform as it matures.

Thanks waxy.  The tree does look really healthy.  It was a father day gift from my two little boys so they watch it everyday waiting for a fruit to grow.  I told them we going to have to be very very patient. :)

When you mention prune the sides and to allow the central leader to grow do you mean maintain the sides at a shorter length or cut them off?

How is your Alano?  Would you mind sending me some photos of it.

Thank you

I waited until late winter time to do the pruning, as many other trees.
They take a long time to heal from the wound, and I would not put anything on the wound, the sap it excretes is more than enough to keep pests away.

Growth habits here in NorCal are different, temp swings are one of many factors, so late winter is the best time for us.
It begins around late April (Early Spring) all the way until early October then it goes completely dormant.

My tree is quite old, I think it's well over 10 years old, grown in a container.
Clusters of fruits on it right now, but the fruits take 2 years or more to mature, yes 2 years.
I think I have your contact number, shoot me a PM if you want to see some pictures or I can email you.

Waxy

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2019, 11:42:54 PM »
2 years? That's nuts!

I waited until late winter time to do the pruning, as many other trees.
They take a long time to heal from the wound, and I would not put anything on the wound, the sap it excretes is more than enough to keep pests away.

Growth habits here in NorCal are different, temp swings are one of many factors, so late winter is the best time for us.
It begins around late April (Early Spring) all the way until early October then it goes completely dormant.

My tree is quite old, I think it's well over 10 years old, grown in a container.
Clusters of fruits on it right now, but the fruits take 2 years or more to mature, yes 2 years.
I think I have your contact number, shoot me a PM if you want to see some pictures or I can email you.

Waxy
Jeff  :-)

waxy

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2019, 03:06:51 AM »



Fruits were less than half the size a year ago.
I can provide an updated picture by the end of the year and the fruits will be barely the size of a golf ball.

Iíve pruned more than half of what you see in the picture, theyíre still very slow growers.
Especially here, many exotic fruits take their time, end making these fruits available to your grand kids and not you lol

Vince2543

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Re: Alano sapodilla pruning advice
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2019, 07:52:33 PM »
Thanks a lot Waxy for the info.  2 years possibly due to the cooler temps from being up north.

PMed my contact info.

Vince

I had a similar problem with my Alano in the past.
I just pruned the sides and let the center grow.

As it matures, the top branches become thicker and stretch out more, if you're looking for height.
If you leave the growth that low, your tree will remain a dwarf since all the energy is diverted evenly.

Such a healthy looking tree, I'd leave it and perhaps search for another tree that is taller?
A single branched tree should be a great start, then it'll start to grow more uniform as it matures.

Thanks waxy.  The tree does look really healthy.  It was a father day gift from my two little boys so they watch it everyday waiting for a fruit to grow.  I told them we going to have to be very very patient. :)

When you mention prune the sides and to allow the central leader to grow do you mean maintain the sides at a shorter length or cut them off?

How is your Alano?  Would you mind sending me some photos of it.

Thank you

I waited until late winter time to do the pruning, as many other trees.
They take a long time to heal from the wound, and I would not put anything on the wound, the sap it excretes is more than enough to keep pests away.

Growth habits here in NorCal are different, temp swings are one of many factors, so late winter is the best time for us.
It begins around late April (Early Spring) all the way until early October then it goes completely dormant.

My tree is quite old, I think it's well over 10 years old, grown in a container.
Clusters of fruits on it right now, but the fruits take 2 years or more to mature, yes 2 years.
I think I have your contact number, shoot me a PM if you want to see some pictures or I can email you.

Waxy

 

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