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Author Topic: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety  (Read 1500 times)

911311

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seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« on: June 08, 2019, 09:52:39 AM »

  I've checked everywhere in the US but could find a seedless variety of yuzu. The normal seedy yuzu is now everywhere but it was impossible to find it outside of Japan. I am happy with the less seedy yuzu as well.

  I would appreciate so much if someone find me a place to purchase one.

 Thank you very much

lebmung

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2019, 05:39:19 AM »
Some plants are only for collection. Think that people invest time and money to collect, and to sell it for few tens of dollars online it doesn't really make any sense.

911311

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2019, 11:45:21 PM »
   justfruitsandexotics.com will soon have seedless yuzu available on their webpage. This seedless yuzu is not a special tree for collection. They are very cheap and so common in Japan. If I have a chance to get back to my country, I will pay a visit to Japan and buy several nice citrus varieties overthere to multiply them in my homeland. I will probably try to sneak some scionwood into the US.

   These citrus might only be rare to those selfish collectors in US and the Europe. There were bunches of excellent citrus varieties in Asia to be considered. Nothing special about citrus to be collected. No body cares, and no body praise for the possession of such citrus trees.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2019, 11:48:02 PM by 911311 »

Sylvain

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2019, 07:20:33 AM »
Do you really want to bring CTV (from Japan) and greening (from China) to your country?
You shall grow no citrus in jail...  :(

Millet

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2019, 11:18:26 AM »
>I will probably try to sneak some scionwood into the US.< 

911311, that sentence says a lot about your character.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 11:20:38 AM by Millet »

911311

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2019, 02:10:28 PM »
>I will probably try to sneak some scionwood into the US.< 

911311, that sentence says a lot about your character.

 Lol you should not judge anyone here about their character. This forum is not designed for judging each other. As a mod you should know this. Think about it and look at your judgement.

Millet

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2019, 02:57:52 PM »
911311, you should not write on this forum about SNEAKING illegal budwood into this country.  Bringing illegal budwood into the USA is EXACTLY what caused HLB in our country, and thousand upon thousand lost their jobs and lively hood. and destroyed Florida's citrus industry.

Laaz

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2019, 05:46:10 PM »
911311 have fun. You should expect a visit from customs
...

mikkel

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2019, 06:01:43 PM »
I don`t think it`s enthusiasts who are responsable for bringing diseases to their countries. Enthusiasts are just the minor part. It is the globalization, international trade which ships diseases arond the world. All tree diseases in the last years in Europe are hardly introduced by single persons.
It`s the official and completely legal import of thousand of tons of wood and fruits which causes it. It`s just a matter of statistics that among such an enourmous amount of trade goods are some unwanted passengers. And no one, no custom on earth can control and test all these goods.
When you say globalization this is the price.

Of course this doesn`t mean it is save to introduced plant material by single person it is definately not but it shows the relation what is more dangerous I think.


Millet

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2019, 08:25:48 PM »
Mikkel, there is a lot of truth in what you wrote.  In the case of HLB the disease was introduced into the USA by a single person with budwood from Japan.

Sylvain

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2019, 04:50:46 AM »
I'd like to read about that. Do you have sources? Thanks.

SoCal2warm

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2019, 11:26:30 AM »
California has a special program (CCPP) where you can have budwood mailed there, and they will test it to make sure it doesn't have greening disease and propagate it, and then you can eventually have them send budwood. That might be the safest way. It's not too expensive.

911311

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2019, 06:19:42 PM »
California has a special program (CCPP) where you can have budwood mailed there, and they will test it to make sure it doesn't have greening disease and propagate it, and then you can eventually have them send budwood. That might be the safest way. It's not too expensive.

 Thank SoCal, it's good to know this.

will2358

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2019, 07:09:51 PM »
My name is Cindy

fruitmentor

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2020, 03:58:38 PM »
Sorry for reviving this old threat, but there are some misconceptions expressed in some of these posts that I hope that I can help to clear up.

Hobbyists smuggling budwood is actually one of the main ways that citrus diseases spread around the world. Also citrus pests that spread diseases also tend to ride on citrus budwood, so moving those pests can be a major problem if someone else has already smuggled the disease.

I interviewed some people from the California Department of Food and Agriculture last year. You can watch that video here:
CDFA Interview

One thing that I learned in that interview is that there are multiple strains of HLB in California that represent multiple smuggling incidents. HLB has not been found in citrus farms in California. This is a strong indication that the source of the disease is hobbyists who have smuggled budwood into the state. Here is an article on the first detection of HLB in California in a tree that was grafted by a hobbyist:
LA Times article

Japan has a major problem with citrus diseases and the country is unable to farm many types of citrus because of the disease issue. Among those diseases is severe stem pitting tristeza. Anyone considering smuggling budwood out of Japan would do well to understand this problem better and watch my recent video on citrus diseases:
14 Nasty Citrus Diseases

There is also a lot of good information in my recent interview with Georgios Vidalakis of the CCPP:
Interview with Georgios Vidalakis of the CCPP

I apologize that I have not been a regular on here lately. Everyone, please feel free to post my videos in threads like this. We all love to grow citrus but disease is such a major problem these days. It can be spread so easily by people who don't understand these issues.

Best regards,
Dan Willey

Millet

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2020, 03:14:26 PM »
Thanks Dan, excellent article.

mikkel

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2020, 02:19:43 AM »
I totally agree. I just don't understand why there are no legal ways to import. If e.g. NARO in Japan were to make available tested disease-free varieties, the problem would be much smaller.
As always, as long as there are bans, there will be someone to bypass them. Nobody can control the trade 100%. Sad but true. I am absolutely pessimistic about the spread of disease. Not only in Citrus.
On top import bans won't help if at the same time diseases are spread through normal trade as a by-product.

mikkel

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2020, 02:26:51 AM »
By the way, are there any ideas where HLB has been all these centuries before its recent outbreak? in Asia there should be an area where it is indigenous. Or is it a newly developed disease? Are there any sources on that?

Ilya11

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2020, 06:02:05 AM »
By the way, are there any ideas where HLB has been all these centuries before its recent outbreak? in Asia there should be an area where it is indigenous. Or is it a newly developed disease? Are there any sources on that?

https://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/pdf/10.1094/PHYTO-07-18-0255-IA
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Millet

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Re: seeking seedless or less-seedy yuzu variety
« Reply #19 on: February 29, 2020, 09:35:03 PM »
Ilya11, thank you for the excelling HLB history.  It will take a little while to read through all the information.  Again thanks.

 

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