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Author Topic: ...on sapodillas  (Read 259 times)

JoeP450

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...on sapodillas
« on: June 11, 2019, 09:52:58 PM »



Friend gave me this fruit from Nelsonís in ft pierce, first one Iíve enjoyed as it wasnít sweet overload more balanced, but the grit was persistent...questions for the forum whatís the grit? Are their cultivars with non existent sandlike grit? TIA

-Joep450

Cookie Monster

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Re: ...on sapodillas
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2019, 10:37:08 PM »
Most of the selected cultivars are either smooth and free of grit (eg, alano, silas woods, makok) or with a very tiny / nearly undetectable amount of grit (tikal, morena).

Oddly, though, I prefer the fruit of seedling trees with plenty of grit. The grit gives it substance and reminds me of a bartlett pear




Friend gave me this fruit from Nelsonís in ft pierce, first one Iíve enjoyed as it wasnít sweet overload more balanced, but the grit was persistent...questions for the forum whatís the grit? Are their cultivars with non existent sandlike grit? TIA

-Joep450
Jeff  :-)

demingcr

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Re: ...on sapodillas
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2019, 11:47:31 PM »



Friend gave me this fruit from Nelsonís in ft pierce, first one Iíve enjoyed as it wasnít sweet overload more balanced, but the grit was persistent...questions for the forum whatís the grit? Are their cultivars with non existent sandlike grit? TIA

-Joep450

The "Grit" is called stone cells. Similar to what is in Pears.

As mentioned in the post above, some are bred to lessen this effect.
- Colin

 

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