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Author Topic: Marsh Grapefruit  (Read 460 times)

Millet

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Marsh Grapefruit
« on: June 15, 2019, 09:54:20 PM »
My white Marsh Seedless Grapefruit was planted in the ground December 2014. So it nearing 5 years old.  It sets plenty fruit, which are getting better as the tree ages.   Most members have heard to let grapefruit hang on the tree at least until March to improved a grapefruit's taste. I picked a couple in March, and the fruit still quite bitter due to the tree's young age.  I picked a second one early in May, and the taste had improved.  Most all of the fruit are still attached to the tree today (June 15).. I am going to pick one tomorrow (Fathers day) and give it a try. Will report back.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 11:22:39 AM by Millet »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2019, 10:29:38 PM »
Not even a quick mention to how your tree is surviving in the ground in Colorado?

That's kind of an important detail.

Laaz

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2019, 06:15:05 AM »
Bob, I don't think it's the age or length of time. Grapefruit require a lot of heat to properly sweeten up. There's a reason commercial grapefruit are not grown in California. Here in the south is where the grapefruit produce the best tasting fruit.

TooFarNorth

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2019, 09:58:40 AM »
Heat must play a big role in the quality of grapefruit.  My first year UGA Pink Frost tree produced one fruit last year, and it was as good as any pink that I have had.  Not bitter at all. 

TFN

Laaz

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2019, 10:15:10 AM »
Indeed, a long hot growing season is key to building up sugars in grapefruit. They will grow fine in a Mediterranean climate, but will not produce the best fruit...

Millet

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2019, 11:29:30 AM »
Laaz, I agree that grapefruit are a heat loving variety.  However, this tree is grown inside a large greenhouse, with day time temperatures in the 80s and night temperatures never fall below 55-F.  Anyway, we shall see what we shall see.  I'm interested in tasting the next fruit.  The reason I grow Marsh, which is a seedless white variety, is because I like white grapefruit.  These days all one can find in stores are red grapefruit varieties.

Laaz

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2019, 11:33:23 AM »
Publix here has white grapfruit from time to time.

Galka

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2019, 11:53:58 AM »
I've bought a big bag of Pink Marsh. They're delicious. Two to three seeds inside. I will have to go get a few more bags, so yummy.

brian

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2019, 03:13:16 PM »
My marsh grapefruit was looking sickly after the scale battle I was fighting last year, but now it has bounced back with lots of new growth.  I am keeping it and a Flame grapefruit to see which I prefer.   I might have to find room for both. 

SoCal2warm

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2019, 03:57:30 PM »
Bob, I don't think it's the age or length of time. Grapefruit require a lot of heat to properly sweeten up. There's a reason commercial grapefruit are not grown in California.
I've had Oroblanco grapefruit that was grown in Riverside, a hot desert-like part of Southern California. They were very good.
There is a fair amount of Oroblanco grapefruit commercially grown in California, probably in the hotter parts away from the coast, but still in areas further south or not too far inland so they do not have to contend with frost.

Pancrazio

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2019, 07:24:20 PM »
Personally i think that a good white grapefruit has to be among the best citrus. It has everything. Sweetness to hook you, tangyness to remain interesting, bitternes to be remembered.
I have had report of good tasty grapefruit being grown in Mediterranean countries, but without having tasted a florida grown one, i can't really say if they were good for real. What i thought, about heat, was such: why can't they be left to hang on tree for two consecutive summers? Some bitter oranges manage to do that and a lot of citrus hold on tree for long. If grapefruits can hold on tree till the end of the next summer after ther pollination i'm sure the problem of lack of heat can be avoided? Anyone has ever tried? I never grown a grapefruit for so long that i could try that myself. What do you guys think?
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Millet

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2019, 07:33:44 PM »
Sounds plausible.  However, I don't know if the tree will hold them that long.  Also, for most citrus cultivars, when fruit is left on the tree, then the next blooming and fruiting season is greatly retarded.

Laaz

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2019, 08:04:52 PM »
Bob if you edit my posts one more time I'm done with this forum. Looks like it may be time to start a new forum!

TooFarNorth

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2019, 08:17:40 PM »
Millet, have you picked it yet?

TFN

Laaz

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2019, 08:36:22 PM »
Bob, I don't think it's the age or length of time. Grapefruit require a lot of heat to properly sweeten up. There's a reason commercial grapefruit are not grown in California.

I've had Oroblanco grapefruit that was grown in Riverside, a hot desert-like part of Southern California. They were very good.
There is a fair amount of Oroblanco grapefruit commercially grown in California, probably in the hotter parts away from the coast, but still in areas further south or not too far inland so they do not have to contend with frost.


Once again, you've shown your ignorance. You're special... Oroblanco is not a true grapefruit, it was developed in CA for a CA climate. Do your homework before posting nonsense...








Laaz

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2019, 09:00:24 PM »
Personally i think that a good white grapefruit has to be among the best citrus. It has everything. Sweetness to hook you, tangyness to remain interesting, bitternes to be remembered.
I have had report of good tasty grapefruit being grown in Mediterranean countries, but without having tasted a florida grown one, i can't really say if they were good for real. What i thought, about heat, was such: why can't they be left to hang on tree for two consecutive summers? Some bitter oranges manage to do that and a lot of citrus hold on tree for long. If grapefruits can hold on tree till the end of the next summer after ther pollination i'm sure the problem of lack of heat can be avoided? Anyone has ever tried? I never grown a grapefruit for so long that i could try that myself. What do you guys think?

You haven't had a GOOD grapefruit until you've had one fresh off the tree ripe. The fruit you get in the stores was picked long before it was at peak & waxed & sent off to the stores probably months before it was ready.

Calusa

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2019, 09:13:32 PM »
Bob, I don't think it's the age or length of time. Grapefruit require a lot of heat to properly sweeten up. There's a reason commercial grapefruit are not grown in California. Here in the south is where the grapefruit produce the best tasting fruit.

This^^

The best tasting citrus generally, in my humble opinion.

If you like white grapefruit, as I do - plant a Duncan in your green house.

Bomand

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2019, 09:52:44 PM »
Marsh is a very good grapfruit. I raise marsh and have no gripe about it
 We get a lot of Ruby here as it is everywhere in Texas.....but give me Marsh.

Millet

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2019, 03:06:15 PM »
I picked one of my Mash white seedless grapefruits yesterday (June 19).  The bitterness was totally gone leaving the traditional taste of a white grapefruit - very good.  After hanging on the  tree all this time it was extremely juicy, Really very juicy.   As the saying goes.....Good things come to those who wait.

Pancrazio

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2019, 05:05:09 PM »
Hey Millet, how long your fruit hang on the tree?
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Millet

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2019, 10:37:53 PM »
Pancrazio, this fruit was from the 2018 spring bloom (March 2018).  Therefore, the fruit I picked yesterday has hung on the tree for 14.5 months.

Pancrazio

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2019, 08:26:47 PM »
"Picked" means it was still attached to the tree right? It didn't drop, right?
I'm very interested even if i think that my low temperatures at least once per winter under -5C won't allow me to have juicy fruits.
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Millet

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Re: Marsh Grapefruit
« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2019, 08:48:20 PM »
Pancrazio, your correct, the fruit was still attached to the tree.  There are still a lot of fruit remaining on the tree to pick.

 

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