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Author Topic: Please Explain the Variability in Sugar (Sweetness) in Ripe Mangos Same Tree  (Read 308 times)

johnb51

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With deciduous stone fruits (peaches, plums, apricots) it seems that the sweetness of the fruit depends only on whether it's fully tree-ripened or not.  With mangoes the same tree is all over the place with sugar content and even with flavor.  Is exposure to direct sun the most important factor determining sweetness?  Can you explain to me what's going on?  (The science.)
John

FMfruitforest

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Eating from the same mango tree for years I have noticed there is a peak in sweetness that occurs mid season. Also fruit that have been hit by the sun on both sides seem sweeter.



simon_grow

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The fruit on the south side of the tree can be sweeter and the bottom of the fruit is sweeter because of gravity. The south side of a tree gets more direct sun and directly heats up the fruit and leaves increasing respiration/photosynthesis creating more sugars.

Total Soluble Solids is basically the minerals in the fruit. In any given fruit, the areas of higher TSS has more minerals and the juice is heavier so will settle towards the bottom of the fruit. This is very evident when you test the Brix of a Pineapple.

Simon

Future

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The fruit on the south side of the tree can be sweeter and the bottom of the fruit is sweeter because of gravity. The south side of a tree gets more direct sun and directly heats up the fruit and leaves increasing respiration/photosynthesis creating more sugars.

Total Soluble Solids is basically the minerals in the fruit. In any given fruit, the areas of higher TSS has more minerals and the juice is heavier so will settle towards the bottom of the fruit. This is very evident when you test the Brix of a Pineapple.

Simon

Excellent commentary. Some pros suggest keeping pineapples upside down for a while to redistribute sugars. Now I wonder if mango storage orientation can make any discernible difference. Nothing a controlled study and a brix meter canít verify!

johnb51

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Ok, so it is all about exposure to the sun.  My Pickering tree has full sun exposure on the east and north sides of the tree.  The south and west sides get shade from neighbors' trees.  That's the tree that is most variable.  Also, the shaded sides set much less fruit.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 09:12:47 PM by johnb51 »
John

561MangoFanatic

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Hey John! Thank you for posting this topic as I also wondered having the same experience with a certain tree. Iíve noticed a substantial difference in flavor comparing fruit from the same tree and the only difference being sun exposure.

Iíve also heard the same thing about gravity pulling the sugars from the top of the fruit to the bottom and sometimes store mangos & pineapples upside down but whether itís made a difference.. Iíve yet to see one.
Serg

 

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