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Author Topic: Grafting  (Read 313 times)

will2358

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Grafting
« on: July 02, 2019, 02:52:46 PM »
I wanted to try my hand at grafting. Which grafting technique do you have the most success with? I have been looking at the videos by fruitmentor on Youtube but I would like imput from this form on your techniques.

frukt

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2019, 04:47:25 PM »
Im also starting with grafting. Find it really cool but now I really need to graft a lot after the fire we had here. I had great success with barkgrafting and cleft grafting on peaches, 80 % so most trees have several grafts taking. I tried with orange on lemon. No success but maybe it was to early. Now I tried again with whip and tounge i think its called. Tried with a tar to cover and with tape. The electric tape works great in spring with peaches and so but in the summerheat I think the tape dries and rolls up a bit. Tried with chip bud now. Appearently the only graft you can do all year round. Fixed it to the roots with organic thread made of straw, then cover that with plastic film and finally cover that with aluminium folie. Made it some days ago so lets see, oxala :)

But I think i will stick to this way of covering the graft. If i get my hands on parafilm then i whould change that for the plastic film but I think its mostly a comfort working with. Have a friend that uses any plastic and then cover everything with clay soil. Works great!

But I whould love to read more and look forward to many good answers. How to succed with harder grafts as macadamia and mulberry??

Laaz

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2019, 06:52:41 PM »
Inverted t-budding is my go to, but the bark must be slipping. If not then cleft or chip budding.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2019, 07:14:23 AM by Laaz »

Florian

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2019, 10:31:55 AM »
I am very bad at grafting but often succeed with cleft grafts.

Bomand

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2019, 12:52:32 PM »
For a novice I recommend cleft grafting. Bark does not have to be slipping and you control temp. Make sure cambium is lined up on at least one side, good tight wrap, cover with plastic bag, place in shade, keep watered. Novice recipe for success.

Zitrusgaertner

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2019, 04:29:29 PM »
use parafolm grafting tape. Since I have found this I am nearly 100% successful.

lavender87

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2019, 09:13:39 PM »
   I had little experience on citrus grafting, but I had great success in jujube grafting. With jujube, bark graft induced the fastest healing in the graft uinon followed by the tongue graft technique. Cleft graft was the least successful technique in jujube.

   In citrus, I think commercial nurseries prefered bud graft. I prefer bud graft as well because we could try many grafted buds at once and then keep the most successful one. If all failed we could start over with a new batch; however, with the overgrown rootstocks, the best technique would be bark graft for its quick healing ability. The only drawback in barkgraft as I experienced was the potential later graft failure after years due to rotten inside-out within the graft union.

   In my experience, I think the graft union will do better if the graft was done at very young stage when the rootstock was small because the inner scar will be minimized which would definitely reduce the risk of later graft failure and will also extend the life span of the grafted tree.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 09:16:32 PM by lavender87 »

will2358

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2019, 05:48:28 PM »
Is it true that your scion must be dormant and ready to brake dormancy to do veneer grafting. It looks like the easiest grafting method, but If the dormancy thing is true I will need to wait til spring to try it. I did not see any videos with veneer grafting citrus. Is it not a good method for citrus? Can you leave the original tree foliage on a veneer graft.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 05:53:01 PM by will2358 »

Bomand

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2019, 07:24:01 PM »
I have a smaller percentage of "takes" with veneer grafts. Better to use chip or cleft if no slipping bark. You need to do tbudding if bark is slipping. I like to graft with dormsnt materials.....get parafilm.....easy to use, fast and foolproof with just a minimum of skill.

lavender87

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2019, 10:55:52 PM »
Is it true that your scion must be dormant and ready to brake dormancy to do veneer grafting. It looks like the easiest grafting method, but If the dormancy thing is true I will need to wait til spring to try it. I did not see any videos with veneer grafting citrus. Is it not a good method for citrus? Can you leave the original tree foliage on a veneer graft.

  Veneer grafting is one of the bark graft style. I had nearly 100% success with veneer graft (bark graft) in jujube. I called it bark graft because I made a T cut on the bark and only striped a thin layer of bark just enough to expose the cambium layer then I slided the scionwood in. If you strip too deep, you might also remove the cambium layer and expose softwood layer which limit the contact area of the rootstock and the scionwood leading to lower graft success and taking longer to heal. I will take pictures of those graft unions when I have time.

  I recently had success with cleft graft on extremely young citrus. The rootstock was the poncirus trifoliata at about 2 months old. It was not vigorous as I expected, but it shot out new bud a couple days ago after 3 weeks.

  No, the scionwood does not require to be dormant, but the rootstock does require to be woken up at least 2 weeks prior to any graft taking place, otherwise, some of the scionwood might get dried before the graft  union has enough time to heal. In my experience, the fresh scionwood would have higher chance of success than dormant wood. With fresh scionwood, you need to remove all leaves when the grafting takes place to prevent wood from drying.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 11:03:58 PM by lavender87 »

will2358

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2019, 11:15:18 AM »
I received my graphing tool yesterday. Any comments on the tool is welcomed. I have never used anything like this before.



Bomand

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2019, 11:24:20 AM »
Probably will work for stone fruits and others.....citrus requires closer cambium matches....this would take the fun and skill out of citrus grafting for me. It would make a good trot line sinker.

Vlad

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2019, 11:44:06 AM »
I have one but rarely use it because I found it difficult to align the knife so that it cuts in the middle of the branch. I do mostly cleft grafts now.

will2358

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2019, 01:17:46 PM »
Probably will work for stone fruits and others.....citrus requires closer cambium matches....this would take the fun and skill out of citrus grafting for me. It would make a good trot line sinker.

lebmung

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2019, 02:08:00 PM »
I received my graphing tool yesterday. Any comments on the tool is welcomed. I have never used anything like this before.



I tried that Chinese tool, a total waste of money. A victorinox knife is enough.

Millet

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2019, 04:43:14 PM »
I have never used the instrument shown.  I only use a simple grafting knife.

Bomand

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2019, 05:04:16 PM »
That was rude of me. I apoligize. Let me restate: No grafting tool can do what I do with a razor edged grafting knife and a roll of parafilm.

lavender87

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Re: Grafting
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2019, 06:27:18 PM »
I have one but rarely use it because I found it difficult to align the knife so that it cuts in the middle of the branch. I do mostly cleft grafts now.

  I think cleft graft is only good for small diameter branches. With medium diameter, I would use tongue graft (Z or N graft) if the rootstock and scionwood are at the same size. If the rootstock is too large in diameter compared to the scionwood then bark graft is the best in my opinion.

  I have seen people used cleft graft when dealing with big rootstock and small scionwood, but this style is not a good choice at least to me because the contact of cambium is significantly smaller compared to bark graft. If rootstock is too big we should graft 2 or more scionwood at the same time around the bark of the rootstock, so the scar will be covered much quicker.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 06:29:22 PM by lavender87 »

 

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