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Author Topic: Extreme chlorosis  (Read 663 times)

SeaWalnut

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Extreme chlorosis
« on: July 07, 2019, 07:20:08 PM »
2 feijoa seedlings with severe chlorosis.I will treat them by mixing liquid smoke( pyrolignos acid/ humic acid) with water and with a few nails.I also added some 20 iron nails into each pot recently.I only treat the roots because foliar would be too easy to fix ,like something that fix the simptoms but doesnt heal the disease.

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2019, 07:36:04 PM »
Why don't you just add Rock Dust (Azomite) for all of the trace elements and some organic fertilizer like chicken manure or worm casting?

I don't understand your treatment (liquid smoke). Just give the plant what it needs and you will be fine.

Johnny


Guanabanus

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2019, 07:42:18 PM »
Adding nails to soil isn't natural either!
Har

SeaWalnut

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2019, 08:21:00 PM »
Liquid smoke or wood vinnegar its pyroligneous acid that results from the condensed vapors when cooking wood,usually to make charcoal.
Its a natural and considered a bio product.Its not really a fertiliser but it contains organic acids that chelates iron for instance.
Iron nails i think its also natural and bio because they will rust and there are ultisoils soo high in iron that they contain the equivalent of 300 grams of nails ( plus 500 grams of oxigen) per kilo of soil=800 grams of iron oxide per kilo of soil.Its non toxic but the reason why plants dont grow well on such high iron soils its because all the phosphorus its trapped in a non available form( non available not even for fungi).But there are still plants like the proteaceae that release carboxylates through their roots so that they can use somme of those blocked phosphates.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2019, 08:11:07 AM »
The iron nails worked well.These plants didnt had a ph issue before ( ph was low all the time and i was watering with water that has 5 ph) and only the nails did this,they recovered.

shot

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2019, 08:31:53 AM »
Azomite is alkaline which would aggravate the defficiency.Nails heavy metals content unknown?

SeaWalnut

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2019, 08:51:29 AM »
Azomite is alkaline which would aggravate the defficiency.Nails heavy metals content unknown?
Possibly trace elements of healty heavy metals but i bet its less than in a garlick bulb( contains arsenic).
Heavy metals in normal ammounts are healty.I use iron nails,the cheapest possible nails that rust.

K-Rimes

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2019, 12:07:44 PM »
I have used Espoma iron tone, or a chelated liquid iron supplement for lawns... Seems effective, though the nails are probably a nice long dose.

lebmung

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2019, 02:08:13 PM »
Nails are nonsense.  Toxic as well.
If you need iron which is available at 7-9 ph pm,  you'll see a difference in few days and it's not toxic.

gnappi

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2019, 09:17:12 AM »
Many nails are galvanized stay away from them, and most other nails are made from steel.

I doubt you can find iron nails anymore unless your local hardware store has them.  Even then I doubt you'd see anything like a quick recovery if you used them in the soil.

Get chelated iron at your local big box store it works.
Regards,

   Gary

Coach62

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2019, 09:22:32 AM »
Adding nails to soil isn't natural either!

Har, could you please expand on that? 
www.ableinspector.com

Stop New Yorking my Florida!

Bruce

SeaWalnut

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2019, 09:34:16 AM »
Many nails are galvanized stay away from them, and most other nails are made from steel.

I doubt you can find iron nails anymore unless your local hardware store has them.  Even then I doubt you'd see anything like a quick recovery if you used them in the soil.

Get chelated iron at your local big box store it works.
Steel = iron+ ash( carbon,harmless).
Galvanised steel isnt toxic either and a lot of gardeners use galvanised buckets as pots or real pots made with same material,raised beds etc.It would not rust that easy as carbon steel or iron .
To see how fast the iron nails did the job,you can look at the date of the first post and the date of the post with plants that recovered.

Guanabanus

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Re: Extreme chlorosis
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2019, 09:59:35 AM »
I didn't say nails are harmful, and I didn't say they don't work.  I said that adding nails to soil does not imitate what plants encounter in nature, so if one is doctrinally willing to apply nails, industrially-processed iron, to soil, one should also be willing to apply other industrially-processed elements, fertilizers, to the same soil.

[Easy "home remedies" are not necessarily "organic", for doctrinal purists.]

Galvanized nails won't release their iron anytime soon, but they will release Zinc, which is usually also a good thing.

And any Cobalt, Manganese, and Nickel present in nails as "impurities" will also be good.

Har

 

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