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Author Topic: Suspicious Plants  (Read 469 times)

will2358

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Suspicious Plants
« on: July 26, 2019, 08:52:28 PM »
I just received these citrus plants from one of the on-line nursery. Is this a mineral deficiency or something worse. I just notified them of these plants.









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Bomand

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2019, 09:16:44 PM »
Agreed that these plants are in poor shape. I would send them back. I do not know where you got them but there are good places to get citrus. If you pm me I can steer you to a reputable place. Never start out with unhealthy plants. How long were they in transit?

SeaWalnut

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2019, 09:22:07 PM »
Maybe its a ph issue that affects the iron.

will2358

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2019, 11:30:52 PM »
Agreed that these plants are in poor shape. I would send them back. I do not know where you got them but there are good places to get citrus. If you pm me I can steer you to a reputable place. Never start out with unhealthy plants. How long were they in transit?
It has not been in the mail that long no more than 4 days. I did emailed them today and I will call tomorrow about how bad they are. I was afraid it might be the greening disease.
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Bomand

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2019, 03:06:50 AM »
Greening disease has symptoms, but they are like symptoms of other diseases. The pics you show could/could not be hlb. Tissue test is really only way to tell at early stages.

pvaldes

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2019, 04:51:43 AM »
Not necessarily greening disease. Look like rooted scions cultured in a soil that at this point could be depleted. Could be a deficience in Molybdenum, Zinc or Nitrogen also, for example.

Millet

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2019, 11:17:06 AM »
Terrible trees.  The supplier should be ashamed.  The leaf looks to be deficient in iron.  The symptoms of an iron deficiency are leaves with green veins on an otherwise yellow leaf with no green border areas around the vein.  Iron deficiency can result from an actual lack of iron, and also can be caused by high pH rather than a  shortage of the mineral.  To correct the deficiency apply iron chelate or iron sulfate to the trees root zone.

will2358

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2019, 01:24:39 PM »
I just called Four Seasons Nursery and they telling me that there is nothing they can do until I pay to ship the plants back to them. They are telling me they can ship replacements. I asked them why would they ship such bad looking plants if they had better looking ones. I even threaten to report them to one of the agriculture departments for shipping plants that could have a disease. It didn't seem to matter to them. I will call again on Monday.
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Bomand

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2019, 01:29:01 PM »
I am sorry to hear that. Four Seasons should be rode out on a rail. PM me for a good outlet.
 

will2358

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2019, 09:01:47 PM »
You guys are correct it is a mineral deficiency. After unpacking and removing from the pots they were so root bound I had to cut the pots off of the plants. I potted one up in a gallon pot. I think it will soon be happy.






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Millet

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2019, 09:28:41 PM »
Will, roots grow like a bullet goes -- straight..  In other words, they will continue to grow in a straight line until they hit an object and turn.  If you don't tease out the tree's roots they will continue to grow as is and  not fill the new container.

Bomand

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2019, 03:32:38 AM »
I like to wash out the soil and gently dislodge tbe roots. Sometimes if the roots are in a big rats nest I prune the rootball.

pvaldes

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2019, 06:21:51 AM »
Finger comb the rootball gently, put it in a rich organic soil with lots of old manure, add water, and will be happy in no time.

Millet

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2019, 09:43:04 AM »
I would add this...  Manure is great for in ground trees.  However, for container grown trees, manure contains too muny salts and is normally never used.  If one does use manure, do as pvaldez writes and BE SURE that the manure is very old.  Personally I would not consider using it.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2019, 09:48:36 AM by Millet »

Bomand

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2019, 10:31:08 AM »
Manure is pretty strong stuff and full of various salts. Well composted manure is good for seed beds but I would not use for soil or fertilize. I have used well composted manure tea...water well if you use it.

will2358

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2019, 11:22:44 AM »
The poor thing is putting out blooms. This is the Calamondin orange. It is the plant that is very yellow in color.



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Zitrusgaertner

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2019, 11:07:34 AM »
Manure is pretty strong stuff and full of various salts. Well composted manure is good for seed beds but I would not use for soil or fertilize. I have used well composted manure tea...water well if you use it.
horse manure has Always been used as Citrus fertilizer. For hundreds of years. And composted horse manure is one component of the Citrus-soil that is used for the Citrus-collection of Schönbrunn Castle in Vienna.

Millet

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2019, 06:03:46 PM »
Zitrusgaertner,  as to the horse manure that Schonbrunn Castle uses, do you know how old the manure is or if it has been composted?  As I do not live in Europe I am not familiar with European cultivation practices.  I do know no reputable nursery in the USA would ever consider using hoarse manure as potting mixture.

Zitrusgaertner

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2019, 07:45:36 AM »
300 years of good practice.
For potting soil horse manure is composted for two years. And I suppose USA nurseries don't use composted Beech-foliage either. Old Europeans have been growing Citrus for at least 2000 years. But you Americans do everything better, know everythig better and you decide what's good taste and which is not. This sometimes is a little bit annoying.

Bomand

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #19 on: August 08, 2019, 08:39:21 AM »
Your opinions are yours and I laud your dedicated view. Because European practices and ideas are old does not make them the best or workable for everyone. It is also annoying when you think they are.

Millet

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2019, 10:23:26 AM »
Zitrusgaerner,  your correct.  No one in this country uses composted Beech foliage.   In fact I have never even heard of composted Beech foliage. The number one potting mix world wide is a 3-1-1 (3 parts wood chips, 1 part builders sand and 1 part peatmoss.)

SeaWalnut

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Re: Suspicious Plants
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2019, 11:43:20 AM »
I use cow manure and i spread it thin on concrete until it dryes verry well then it pass it through a sieve.After that its good to use as potting mix .If it dryed then it contains verry little nitrogen and its to weak to be used as a fertiliser.
When i use cow manure as fertiliser i use verry fresh manure ,preferably before the dung beetles started to get in it.50/50 water and fresh manure mix,then i speead about  2-3 litters of it every 2 weeks around my younger trees.It is still weak in nitrogen and verry safe to use.
Wood chips i would only use them as mulch because they have zero nitrogen and until they become black soil,they draw nitrogen from the surroundings .I would only use a thin layer of wood chips as mulch because if i fed nitrogen to the tree on a thick bed of mulch,then a lot of that nitrogen will not even reach the tree because it will be used by bacteria and fungi to decompose the wood chips.

 

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