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Author Topic: Trifoliata Seedling Questions  (Read 241 times)

will2358

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Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« on: August 30, 2019, 06:33:40 PM »
The seedlings that are growing from the seed that I planted are growing faster than the seedlings that I dug up from around the tree. The seeds were from green (unripe) fruit. Is there any reasons why they would grow faster? Also one of the dug seedlings has turn into hard wood. Why would something so small develop hardwood? All of the seedling, dug and seed, are about 2 to 2 1/2 inches tall.
Seedlings that I dug up

Seedling from seed of unripe fruit

Seedling with hardwood

My name is Cindy

Bomand

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2019, 07:25:37 PM »
The seedling that has "hardwood" is older than you think. Perhaps it has been pruned off by lawnmower or something else and has regrown. Your other seedlings look as they should. I only plant non mature seed in an emergency situation. In July I lost a fd tree to a storm....ripped the seed out from fruit that normally would be mature in October....no germination as of yet. Evidently your seeds were full size and mature enough to germinate. Good on you. Hope they grow out for you.

kumin

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2019, 07:47:09 PM »
If the seedlings you dug and replanted were barerooted they will go through a period of adaptation known as "transplanting shock". As they are very small this period should be quite short. Once adapted, they should flush and might surpass the growth on your plants grown from seed.The transplanting shock is much more severe for older, larger plants. I've had bigger trees go 5-6 weeks to bounce back from a state of wilted leaves that appeared to be certain death. After reducing the leaf area dramatically, they recovered and are now growing healthily.

will2358

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2019, 10:29:28 PM »
The seedling that has "hardwood" is older than you think. Perhaps it has been pruned off by lawnmower or something else and has regrown. Your other seedlings look as they should. I only plant non mature seed in an emergency situation. In July I lost a fd tree to a storm....ripped the seed out from fruit that normally would be mature in October....no germination as of yet. Evidently your seeds were full size and mature enough to germinate. Good on you. Hope they grow out for you.
It did not have hardwood when I planted it in the container. There is no grass in that yard so I doubt it was mowed. It was taken from a derelict property. It is the same size as the other seedlings, This includes the trunk diameter.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 10:31:27 PM by will2358 »
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kumin

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2019, 04:18:22 AM »
These seedlings are older than the newly germinated ones and are in the process of lignification. Even some annual plants lignify to a certain extent as they age.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 04:38:29 AM by kumin »

will2358

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2019, 11:43:35 AM »
These seedlings are older than the newly germinated ones and are in the process of lignification. Even some annual plants lignify to a certain extent as they age.
I agree that they are older because I noticed that some of the other seedlings are getting hard wood. I wonder why they are so small at 2 to 2 1/2 inches. As you can see in one of the photos they are putting out new leaves. Could it be that they were in too much shade? The mother tree was in shade and they were growing underneath here so it was a very dark area. My sister and I wondered why there were not any larger plants there. I do believe at some point the owners come and pull up the plants so that they don't take over the yard. I have never seen such small plants growing hard wood. I guess we can call them micro trifoliata.  ;D
Showing new leaves

another seedling getting hard wood

first hardwood seedling

Mother plant is a group of trees growing together

Mother plant growing in lots of shade

My name is Cindy

will2358

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2019, 11:44:43 AM »
Another one growing hardwood.


My name is Cindy

Bomand

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2019, 01:55:58 PM »
Hi Cindi
After your pics and text I opine that. The seedlings that you dug up are quite older than you think. They probably have been stunted because of location, lack of nutrients, or any numbers of factors that make small but more mature seedlings. That being said......with good soil, water, sunshine they will put on new growth and reach for the sky. As a comparison I am attaching a photo of poncirus seedlings that I dug this Spring. Note the bark on them. They are about 10 months old.

They are 30" tall  and just over 1/4th inch in diameter. Not there is only green bark on them at this time.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 02:27:44 PM by Bomand »

Millet

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2019, 04:29:53 PM »
Bomand, do you know the actual cultivar name of your poncirus seedlings?  I can see that they are not Flying Dragon.  they have a very healthy look to them.

Bomand

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2019, 04:44:56 PM »
Hi Millet
I do not know the actual cultivar of my poncirus. I have used this for years. I dig the seedlings and get seed from a grove that is wild in the woods. It grows well for me and I have graftable poncirus in a year. That is pretty fast for poncirus. I do keep them watered and fed. If you would like to plant and try them out I would be glad to send you some seed. I just harvested several quarts and treated with fungicide, stored in refrigerator.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 04:53:27 PM by Bomand »

will2358

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2019, 12:40:09 PM »
Bomand those are great looking seedlings. My seedlings have put out new leaves. I was surprise that the seedlings grew from green fruit. They will certainly out grow the ones I dug.
How often do you fertilize seedlings?
My name is Cindy

Bomand

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Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2019, 01:19:22 PM »
I use osmocote plus every 3 months. In between I like to give a little epsom salt and clelated iron. Secret is sun, water and nitrients.

 

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