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Author Topic: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure  (Read 7308 times)

jcaldeira

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Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« on: November 17, 2012, 04:39:23 PM »
A few of my young citrus trees have a yellow leaf problem that I think is a micronutrient deficiency.  I doubt it's nitrogen, because I've fertilized several times during the past year with a general NPK fertilizer and also urea. 

My plan is to now try fertilizing with cow manure, as it contains many micronutrients (See table 1 in this paper: http://www.uwex.edu/ces/forage/wfc/proceedings2001/micronutrient_status_of_manure.htm ).  It's not as good as poultry manure, but I have a steady supply thanks to my neighbor's working bullocks. 

I've read that fresh, uncomposted, manure can burn roots, but I'd like to avoid composting that loses a lot of the nutrients and takes time.  Is it okay to put, say, half of one cow pie equivilent (CPE) on each tree's mulch and let the rain work it in?

        

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luc

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2012, 05:30:14 PM »
I make a tea , filling a drum with well dried cow shit and water , seems to work for me have not lost a seedling yet
Luc Vleeracker
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Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2012, 05:48:57 PM »
When I visited Berto, he sent me home with bag of complimentary goat feces.

it really worked well!  applied fresh.  no bad smell, and non burning.

I'm a goat manure fan now.

I just wonder what the downside to fresh manure is?  disease transmission to humans and other livestock are the first hazards that come to mind.

but i don't know if it's likely.

luc

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2012, 08:04:10 PM »
When I visited Berto, he sent me home with bag of complimentary goat feces.

it really worked well!  applied fresh.  no bad smell, and non burning.

I'm a goat manure fan now.

I just wonder what the downside to fresh manure is?  disease transmission to humans and other livestock are the first hazards that come to mind.

but i don't know if it's likely.

I would never take that risk again Adam , a few years ago I ordered a dump-truck load of aged  ' corral ' ( a place where they keep animals at night ) soil ( a mixture of soil and feces ) they assured me it was safe to use , I transplanted  about 500 seedlings using this medium pure , guess what , I lost hundreds of assai and other rare stuff . Now I play it safe , I rather order poor soil and fertilize or make my own mix.
Luc Vleeracker
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Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2012, 11:08:22 PM »
thanks for the advice Luc.

I only top dressed my plants...they are in the ground or in a light mix for potting, in containers.

so at my house the manure is only applied as a fertilizer, not used as a medium for planting.

I hear pure rabbit manure is the best to use as a medium (or heavily mixed into a planting mix).


nullzero

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2012, 12:51:38 AM »
thanks for the advice Luc.

I only top dressed my plants...they are in the ground or in a light mix for potting, in containers.

so at my house the manure is only applied as a fertilizer, not used as a medium for planting.

I hear pure rabbit manure is the best to use as a medium (or heavily mixed into a planting mix).

I have heard good things about rabbit manure. I was thinking about having a pet rabbit or two just for the manure. Fresh worm casting is the best non burning fertilizer, I have used though (worm farming, another thing I want to get around to!).
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

ericalynne

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2012, 08:16:46 AM »
I used to raise lots of rabbits (50-100) and the pellets are wonderful fertilizer and do not have to be composted before side dressing plants. It worked so well and my soil here is so poor I've been thinking about raising rabbits ago just for the manure.

Erica

luc

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2012, 04:44:23 PM »
thanks for the advice Luc.

I only top dressed my plants...they are in the ground or in a light mix for potting, in containers.

so at my house the manure is only applied as a fertilizer, not used as a medium for planting.

I hear pure rabbit manure is the best to use as a medium (or heavily mixed into a planting mix).

I have heard good things about rabbit manure. I was thinking about having a pet rabbit or two just for the manure. Fresh worm casting is the best non burning fertilizer, I have used though (worm farming, another thing I want to get around to!).

So many thing to do , so little time....wanna see my list !
Luc Vleeracker
Puerto Vallarta
Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2012, 04:56:19 PM »
Luc,
 
You've accomplished more than you might think!

you have moringa planted!

and rare eugenias/jaboticabas...and more!

Now start to tease the local people and visitors, with a taste of what you're growing, and give them some free information (about what they could be growing, and how beneficial it might be...extending fruiting season, expanding diet, and creating a market, instead of competing an an already saturated market, like papaya, banana, mango, sapodilla)

I think it may take 5yrs, but you will turn into a source of great interest...not only to visitors from around the world, but also the local people who live near you.

Maybe I'm biased and too optimistic?







Guanabanus

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2012, 09:58:02 PM »
You could probably find Sulfur there.  Three or four handfuls of powdered "asulfre"spread from near trunk to about one meter out, with a repeat treatment  a month later will probably improve these.

You can also likely find "sal amargo" (in Portuguese anyway) in a Pharmacy.  This in English is Epsom salts, Magnesium sulfate.  One handful of this similarly spread would also probably help with this condition.
Har

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2012, 10:44:13 PM »
Rabbits produce great fertilizer. I had 2 pet rabbits many years ago and used the contents of their litter box (newspaper, hay,waste) on my garden. The tomatoes loved it.

But they are very social and like to run and play, so you should get a neutered/spayed pair (and let them out regularly to exercise). They use a litterbox and are sweet pets. I will probably get a pair in a couple years when my daughter is old enough to ask for a pet. (fortunately it is easy to put ideas in their heads when they are very young)
Hollywood

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2012, 10:58:26 PM »
I just realized that I wasn't responding to a question from Mexico!
Har

jcaldeira

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2012, 01:30:13 AM »
I just realized that I wasn't responding to a question from Mexico!

I have already asked my wife, who is visiting the U.S. now, to bring back a kg or two of Epsom Salts, if she has room in the luggage allowance.  Thanks for your suggestion.  If she brings it, I'll post results in a month or two.

John
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bangkok

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2012, 07:57:22 PM »
http://www.aarmangoes.com/organic_farming.html

Here in Thailand the mango-farms use dry cow-dung. Red cow should be the best they told me. I also use it but i still don't know how much i have to use. My neighbour uses very much of it on his vegy-garden and he thinks it is the best.

RodneyS

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2012, 08:15:20 PM »
I've also read about rabbit manure, since it's a cold manure.  I'm assuming guinea pig & hamster manure can be used as well.  They require less space, but may take longer for a sufficient amount of manure. 

I've been worm posting w/ red wigglers & European nightcrawlers in 18 containers.  I've made worm compost tea on 2 occasions.  It seems like my plants have responded well, especially my green sapote seedling.  I keep the containers in the garage, with very little upkeep.  I highly recommend this manure method

DurianLover

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2012, 09:29:57 PM »
http://www.aarmangoes.com/organic_farming.html

Here in Thailand the mango-farms use dry cow-dung. Red cow should be the best they told me. I also use it but i still don't know how much i have to use. My neighbour uses very much of it on his vegy-garden and he thinks it is the best.


Bangkok can you find out what Thai agriculturist think of elephant dung? Supposed to be "king" of dung fertilizers, even better than cow's. I just don't come across good info. I'm assuming a lot of places in Thailand must have access to this stuff...

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2012, 09:47:08 PM »
http://www.aarmangoes.com/organic_farming.html

Here in Thailand the mango-farms use dry cow-dung. Red cow should be the best they told me. I also use it but i still don't know how much i have to use. My neighbour uses very much of it on his vegy-garden and he thinks it is the best.


Bangkok can you find out what Thai agriculturist think of elephant dung? Supposed to be "king" of dung fertilizers, even better than cow's. I just don't come across good info. I'm assuming a lot of places in Thailand must have access to this stuff...


here in FL we use elephant and rhinoceros dung, mixed with other animals from disneys animal kingdom (zoo like themepark)

they call it Mickey manure or Mickey sh!t.

it's great stuff, but drains very fast if you add it to a soil mix.

I find it's best used as a top dress (layed down as fertilizer, like an elephant would drop dung on the ground).

I wonder if the antibiotics they give the zoo animals translates into the soil biology, and eventually the ripe flesh of a fruit?
« Last Edit: November 23, 2012, 09:48:57 PM by ASaffron »

bangkok

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2012, 07:42:06 AM »
The father from my neighbour is an old thai scientific agriculturist but he rarely comes here. I will ask him about elephant dung when i see him. He is fond of red cow dung and uses loads of it he told me.

I only know that now on Koh-Samui island they sell coffee made of elephant dung. The elephant eats the coffee beans and they get them out of the dung and make coffee from it. Just like Civet-coffee in Indonesia.

Waterbuffalo dung is good for making compost  because of the enzymes in it. They use it fresh.




Mike T

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2012, 07:54:06 AM »
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/citrus/management/nutrition/nutrition

It looks a bit like fe and zn deficiency.Citrus are considered easy to diagnose deficiencies of most nutrients and excesses of sodium and chlorides.Manures reflect the soil that the plants the animals ate was grown in.Micronutrients soil deficiencies are usually reflected in animal manures but nutrient tables show general contents.

Soil health is an important as the nutrient assemblage in it. A living soil make make nutrients be delivered more efficiently and last longer.

Tropicdude

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2012, 12:25:37 PM »
If you have Moringa, you already have an excellent plant to make a foliar spray from.  not only does Moringa have a plethora of micros, it also acts as a bio stimulant, because of the amino acids, and natural hormones. ( cytokinins )

More is not better, seems Moringa is powerful stuff,  the basic recipe is,  a 1:30 ratio of water to moringa.  today I am making my first batch.

use young moringa leaves no more than 45 days old.  I picked them, enough o fill 1/2 cup compacted , then added them to a blender with some water.  I will filter this and add it to a 1 gallon sprayer.

another added benefit is its a natural anti-fungal.

My experiment is to see if this will stimulate flowering in my mangoes , I have read that Zeatin ( cytokinins ) have that ability in other plants.  it can also delay fruit maturation so that they have longer shelf life and get bigger on the tree.

I also have a poor looking Meyer lemon tree, that was at work on the porch, leaves are small and yellow, I never have given it any minors , only what was included in a basic 6-6-6 fertilizer granules.

Quote
Moringa leaf extract (MLE): a natural plant growth
enhancer: Leaves of M. oleifera are rich in zeatin, a
cytokinin in addition to other growth enhancing
compounds like ascorbates, phenolic and minerals like
Ca, K, and Fe that makes it an excellent crop growth
enhancer (Anjorin et al., 2010).
Moringa leaf extract is best used as plant growth
enhancer (Phiri & Mbewe, 2010). Foidle (1999) carried
out a project named “Biomasa” to grow moringa and
explored the foliar effects of its extract at three different
concentration i.e., low (12.5 g MLE in 100 mL water),
medium (25 g MLE in 100 mL water) and high (50 g
MLE in 100 mL water) on radish and bean (25 mL per
plant). It was reported that medium level of MLE was
more effective than other treatments. There was an
increase of 94% in radish and 65% in bean because of
MLE application.
Lab experimentation had shown that moringa spray
had a wide range of beneficial effects on plant crops.
Effects of spray indicated accelerated growth of young
plants. Plants were firmer, more resistant to pests and
disease, longer life-span, heavier roots, stems and leaves,
produced more fruit, larger fruit, increase in yield 20-35%
even if a fraction of these results could be reproduced in
the field it could be a great help in increasing food
supplies for millions of hungry people (Foidle et al.,
2001).



[url=http://[url]http://www.anancy.net/documents/file_en/moringawebEN.pdf]

[url]http://www.anancy.net/documents/file_en/moringawebEN.pdf]http://www.fspublishers.org/jass/past-issues/JASSVOL_8_NO_3/10.pdf]

[url=http://[url]http://www.anancy.net/documents/file_en/moringawebEN.pdf]

[url]http://www.anancy.net/documents/file_en/moringawebEN.pdf
[/url]

in cashews it has been shown to control powdery mildew,  increase production in veggies, seems no matter what its used on , it has some benefit .

I have also seen videos of people making homemade seaweed sprays, they just collect seaweed, wash it to remove the salt, blend it etc.

and finally, there seems to be a lot of hoopla over comfrey last couple of years or so.

http://www.comfreybocking14.co.uk/

why permaculture folks love comfrey


This is not the wild comfrey that is invasive, the bocking 14 comfrey is sterile.   not sure how these do in the tropics, but it seems to have the same fertilizing nutrient levels as manure.   
« Last Edit: November 25, 2012, 12:42:49 PM by Tropicdude »
William
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jcaldeira

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2012, 01:24:32 PM »
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/horticulture/citrus/management/nutrition/nutrition

It looks a bit like fe and zn deficiency.Citrus are considered easy to diagnose deficiencies of most nutrients and excesses of sodium and chlorides.Manures reflect the soil that the plants the animals ate was grown in.Micronutrients soil deficiencies are usually reflected in animal manures but nutrient tables show general contents.

Below is a better photo of my undiagnosed citrus problem.  The leaf veins are more yellow than the rest of the leaf, which is not typically from zinc or iron deficiency, and it does not affect the older leaves first.



 My soil test showed lower-than-ideal concentrations of phosphorus, potassium, sodium, copper and zinc. ( http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=3241.msg45661 ) During the past year, I've fertilized with a general NPK fertilizer, urea, and cow manure.

I'm beginning to think it might be a root problem.  How to diagnose a root problem?     -John
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jcaldeira

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2012, 01:27:00 PM »
If you have Moringa, you already have an excellent plant to make a foliar spray from. . . .

I do have Moringa (& powdery mildew on cashew) and will read up on this.  Thanks.  -John
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Tropicdude

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Re: Fertilizing with Fresh Manure
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2012, 10:17:01 PM »
If you have Moringa, you already have an excellent plant to make a foliar spray from. . . .


I do have Moringa (& powdery mildew on cashew) and will read up on this.  Thanks.  -John


http://www.gaia-movement.org/files/0911%20Itoculo%20Moringa%201.pdf

Here is a link to the Moringa MLE on Cashew.
William
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