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Author Topic: Help me identify this fruit  (Read 523 times)

sosamo

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Help me identify this fruit
« on: September 16, 2019, 12:08:51 AM »
Hi, my sis sent me a picture of fruits from her friend's fruit tree.  I was wondering it may be in case I want to try to grow it.  I do have it yet, so pictures of the inside.

Thanks


Oolie

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Re: Help me identify this fruit
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2019, 12:41:08 AM »
The leaves look like avocado in lauraceae, I googled 'bay laurel' and got some very similar looking pictures.

pvaldes

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Re: Help me identify this fruit
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2019, 05:26:33 AM »
Hum, I don't know, is puzzling, with a mix of several things... what about bark or flowers? How is the inside part of the fruit?
« Last Edit: September 16, 2019, 05:30:47 AM by pvaldes »

Botanicus

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Re: Help me identify this fruit
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2019, 09:47:59 AM »
looks like Cinnamomum camphora

pvaldes

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Re: Help me identify this fruit
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2019, 10:51:22 AM »
Fits perfect  :) :)

Those fruits aren't edible therefore. Dry leaves in LOW quantities and cooked are edible as spices. Poisonous instead. Beautiful tree in any case.

sosamo

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Re: Help me identify this fruit
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2019, 01:32:34 PM »
This is such a great forum.  So many ppl with knowledge about fruits.  Thanks for the info.  I don't think i will try to grow it then :D
Cinnamomum camphora


Oolie

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Re: Help me identify this fruit
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2019, 02:15:34 AM »
Nice tree.

In Takeo, in Southwestern Japan, there is an Okusu, or a massive version of one of these trees on a hill slope in a bamboo grove. It's very beautiful, as it has been struck by lightning and the core burnt out, but it still grows.

I was reading the wiki, and found something interesting:
Chemical constituents

The species contains volatile chemical compounds in all plant parts, and the wood and leaves are steam distilled for the essential oils. Camphor laurel has six different chemical variants called chemotypes, which are camphor, linalool, 1,8-cineole, nerolidol, safrole, and borneol. In China, field workers avoid mixing chemotypes when harvesting by their odour.[4][5] The cineole fraction of camphor laurel is used in China to manufacture fake "eucalyptus oil".[6]

The chemical variants (or chemotypes) seem dependent upon the country of origin of the tree. e.g., C. camphora grown in Taiwan and Japan is normally very high in linalool, often between 80 and 85%. In India and Sri Lanka, the high camphor variety/chemotype remains dominant. C. camphora grown in Madagascar, though, is high in 1,8-cineole (averaging between 40 and 50%). The essential oil from the Madagascar trees is commercially known as ravintsara.[7]

I found that to be very interesting, that varieties have distinctive aromas, not unlike Mango.

How would you describe the aroma of the one you have access to?

sosamo

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Re: Help me identify this fruit
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2019, 01:19:04 PM »
Nice tree.

In Takeo, in Southwestern Japan, there is an Okusu, or a massive version of one of these trees on a hill slope in a bamboo grove. It's very beautiful, as it has been struck by lightning and the core burnt out, but it still grows.

I was reading the wiki, and found something interesting:
Chemical constituents

The species contains volatile chemical compounds in all plant parts, and the wood and leaves are steam distilled for the essential oils. Camphor laurel has six different chemical variants called chemotypes, which are camphor, linalool, 1,8-cineole, nerolidol, safrole, and borneol. In China, field workers avoid mixing chemotypes when harvesting by their odour.[4][5] The cineole fraction of camphor laurel is used in China to manufacture fake "eucalyptus oil".[6]

The chemical variants (or chemotypes) seem dependent upon the country of origin of the tree. e.g., C. camphora grown in Taiwan and Japan is normally very high in linalool, often between 80 and 85%. In India and Sri Lanka, the high camphor variety/chemotype remains dominant. C. camphora grown in Madagascar, though, is high in 1,8-cineole (averaging between 40 and 50%). The essential oil from the Madagascar trees is commercially known as ravintsara.[7]

I found that to be very interesting, that varieties have distinctive aromas, not unlike Mango.

How would you describe the aroma of the one you have access to?

I only have the picture.  My sister's friend asked if I want to try to grow the tree.  I thought it was a tropical / rare fruit, but since it is not, I do not want to grow it.  I only have room for container trees now anyways.

 

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