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Author Topic: Japan acid citruses  (Read 2076 times)

Ilya11

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #50 on: September 18, 2019, 06:20:17 AM »
Quote from: lebmung
Ilya can you put some pictures with your tree? Also with leaves
Hello Theodor,
Here is my in ground plant. I regrafted the budwood from Tintory on poncirus, it is now in open without protection for four years.
Rather slow growing compared to the potted one on macrophylla.





Most fruits are seedless



But occasionally they contain few seeds


Best regards,
                       Ilya

lebmung

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #51 on: September 18, 2019, 08:21:53 AM »
Hello Theodor,
Here is my in ground plant. I regrafted the budwood from Tintory on poncirus, it is now in open without protection for four years.
Rather slow growing compared to the potted one on macrophylla.
Most fruits are seedless
But occasionally they contain few seeds
/quote]

Thanks for the pictures. I have the same specimen. I will graft few on PT.
Does it taste good?

Ilya11

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #52 on: September 18, 2019, 09:00:22 AM »
Yes, it has a pleasant smell  and very good balance of sugar/acidity, not at all "Japan acid citrus" ;D
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                       Ilya

lebmung

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #53 on: September 18, 2019, 02:19:23 PM »
Yes, it has a pleasant smell  and very good balance of sugar/acidity, not at all "Japan acid citrus" ;D

Sounds good! I read some articles where they that say it has a brix of 12, similar to satsuma wase. The difference is the ripening period. In Japan that is in December/January tge longer stays on tree the sweater it gets.
My question is if a frost comes in December let's say - 5C will the fruit be ruined?

lebmung

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #54 on: September 18, 2019, 02:21:54 PM »
So here I just grafted keraji




Ilya11

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #55 on: September 18, 2019, 02:50:55 PM »
My Keraji in a pot is flowering in April, fruits are turning yellow in November, at this stage they are not particularly sweet but can be eaten out of hand.
The inground plant flowers in May but has not fruited yet.
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                       Ilya

Zitrusgaertner

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #56 on: September 19, 2019, 08:44:00 AM »
Ilya, you said Keraji ist growing slowly, but mine, high crafted on Poncirus, are the fastest growing plants of all my citri.
I am talking about the in-ground plants in the green house. It is their second year and they have a dense crown of 60cm. Of cause they have been cropped for  round shape. There are four of them -all the same.

Ilya11

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #57 on: September 19, 2019, 09:32:38 AM »
Robert,

My plant is in the ground, no protection.  It  starts to grow rather late in a season.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

lebmung

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #58 on: September 19, 2019, 12:26:19 PM »
Ilya, you said Keraji ist growing slowly, but mine, high crafted on Poncirus, are the fastest growing plants of all my citri.
I am talking about the in-ground plants in the green house. It is their second year and they have a dense crown of 60cm. Of cause they have been cropped for  round shape. There are four of them -all the same.

PT breaks dormancy faster in greenhouse than outside so faster growth. Also I guess it matters the age of roostock, plus what I notices there is a large variety in PT seedling growth rate.
From my latest experiment from 60 PT seeds I got, 30 growing very fast, 30 medium, and 30 slow growth. All variables were the same.

Nothing beats macrophylla if you have warm temperatures all the time.

Oolie

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #59 on: September 21, 2019, 09:03:00 PM »
Hello Ilya, how is the zest on the Keraji? Any suggested uses?

Ilya11

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #60 on: September 22, 2019, 03:55:20 AM »
Very aromatic, resembling satsuma peel.
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                       Ilya

lebmung

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #61 on: September 23, 2019, 06:11:09 AM »
It would be interesting to make a Satsuma/Keraji cross maybe the fruit would get bigger.
I did a Satsuma/Key lime let's see how it grows.

CanadaGrower

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #62 on: October 07, 2019, 06:12:40 PM »
SoCal2Warm, since I can read and write Japanese to a certain extent, I can confirm that it is NOT call Hanaharu. It is in fact read as Keraji. Japanese can be very confusing at times as there are multiple way of reading the same kanji. Generally speaking, the reading of kanji can be split into Onyomi and Kunyomi. In this case, it is simply read as keraji I hope this clears up any confusion.

Organic Cavalry

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #63 on: October 07, 2019, 08:41:34 PM »
When is the optimum time to harvest Yuzu?
I expect to use the rind green... I am in 9b and do not know my variety... I asked fourwinds if they knew...

Thankyou

CanadaGrower

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #64 on: October 07, 2019, 09:09:13 PM »
Organic Cavalry, traditionally Yuzu is picked ripe (yellow). Kabosu/Sudachi are usually the ones that are used while still green. That said, all signs point to picking fruit around Nov/Dec. I have quite a few on mine and intend to wait another month or so until they are ripe

Organic Cavalry

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #65 on: October 08, 2019, 08:49:12 PM »
Organic Cavalry, traditionally Yuzu is picked ripe (yellow). Kabosu/Sudachi are usually the ones that are used while still green. That said, all signs point to picking fruit around Nov/Dec. I have quite a few on mine and intend to wait another month or so until they are ripe

I email fourwinds growers and Carrie said as far as she knows there is only 1 yuzu variety... She sent me this link.
https://citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/yuzu1.html
I just want to be able to identify my tree correctly.

lebmung

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #66 on: October 09, 2019, 03:53:04 AM »
There are many varieties. Some bigger some smaller,  one seedless and many hybrids.

CanadaGrower

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #67 on: October 09, 2019, 03:53:58 PM »
Organic Calvary, Sudachi, Yuzu and Kabosu are all different. Sudachi is generally smaller, and primarily grown in Tokushima prefecture they are usually picked while green and not allowed to ripen. Kabosu is also picked green and much larger it's generally used in sashimi and sushi. Yuzu is the largest of all and picked ripe and it used for everything from making Yuzu Tea(more like marmalade), ponzu sauce, grated over fish and even used in Onsen or Roten-Buro. I'm not sure how interchangeable these varieties are as Tokushima is on the island of Shikoku which is generally much warmer than the island of Honshu.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #68 on: October 09, 2019, 04:45:54 PM »
SoCal2Warm, since I can read and write Japanese to a certain extent, I can confirm that it is NOT call Hanaharu. It is in fact read as Keraji. Japanese can be very confusing at times as there are multiple way of reading the same kanji. Generally speaking, the reading of kanji can be split into Onyomi and Kunyomi. In this case, it is simply read as keraji I hope this clears up any confusion.
Interesting to know. I suspected that.
So there's an alternate way to write "Keraji" in kanji?

CanadaGrower

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #69 on: October 09, 2019, 10:39:48 PM »
I'm going to say likely not. With Japanese often times names can be written in kanji that seems to make little or no sense. Since the the Keraji fruit is named after what appears to be a municipality I would surmise that it is a case where it is simply understood that it is read as Keraji. Much of these anomalies and etymologies are lost in time. I can guarantee you that MANY Japanese would struggle to know how to write that in kanji if they were not locals and were unaware of the fruit itself.

Oolie

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Re: Japan acid citruses
« Reply #70 on: October 11, 2019, 06:58:28 AM »
SoCal2Warm, since I can read and write Japanese to a certain extent, I can confirm that it is NOT call Hanaharu. It is in fact read as Keraji. Japanese can be very confusing at times as there are multiple way of reading the same kanji. Generally speaking, the reading of kanji can be split into Onyomi and Kunyomi. In this case, it is simply read as keraji I hope this clears up any confusion.
Interesting to know. I suspected that.
So there's an alternate way to write "Keraji" in kanji?

Different kanji share the same sounds, so it is possible, but the meaning would be different.
In this case kanji can have multiple sounds, which is why google translate is having a tough time.

Like CanadaGrower has stated, some kanji have archaic pronunciations which don't exist in common diction, but are instead read in the 'old way' when used in locational contexts (place names).

I'm glad that the mystery is solved, I would love to try Keraji.

 

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