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Author Topic: Wasabi?  (Read 389 times)

Organic Cavalry

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Wasabi?
« on: October 14, 2019, 10:34:42 PM »
Good evening Yall,
I am interested in growing Wasabi... I would love tips and direction. I grow horseradish and many exotics... I catch my own tuna and want to grow the perfect condiment!

SeaWalnut

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2019, 10:41:38 PM »
Il be following this .
Im also interested on how do the japanese make that brewed    soy sauce.

Pokeweed

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2019, 08:22:48 AM »
I have been told that the "wasabi" that we get in the restaurants is not actually wasabi. It is some other horseradish. I was told that the real stuff is milder and fruity in taste. Can someone confirm or dispel this?

Organic Cavalry

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2019, 08:51:40 AM »
Next time you go out to sushi, ask for fresh wasabi... ohh man is it ever good! Kinda like a relish, just grated with salt I believe. The stuff we are used to seeing is probably made from powdered wasabi.

Oolie

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2019, 06:14:54 PM »
I have been told that the "wasabi" that we get in the restaurants is not actually wasabi. It is some other horseradish. I was told that the real stuff is milder and fruity in taste. Can someone confirm or dispel this?
It's more aromatic than spicy. The strong nasal burn we associate with prepared wasabi powder is indicative of it's ingredient Horseradish.

I wouldn't seek out wasabi in the US, instead try the wasabi of southern Japan. Yuzu kosho.

Yuzu kosho is better on heavier foods, which are conveniently what we tend to consume in the west. Unlike wasabi, it's obtained in excellent form somewhat easily in the us, and you can make some yourself without rare ingredients. There are several variations on it, so try to make one that suits your tastes.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2019, 06:41:40 PM »
I have been told that the "wasabi" that we get in the restaurants is not actually wasabi. It is some other horseradish. I was told that the real stuff is milder and fruity in taste. Can someone confirm or dispel this?
Your right its made with horseraddish but somme ( the powder ones) i found to have 2% real wasabi.

Pokeweed

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2019, 08:02:33 AM »
Great info. Thanks folks. D

arc310

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2019, 11:00:12 AM »
some interesting videos on wasabi origin on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhlklE9wBSY


Oolie

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2019, 02:45:46 PM »
some interesting videos on wasabi origin on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhlklE9wBSY

The green wasabi is the lesser valued type, providing a more vegetal characteristic. The red kind shown towards the end is the high end type, costing roughly double.

I've seen the green kind for sale in the US at 99 dollars a pound, but have yet to encounter the red type on our shores.

pineislander

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2019, 10:06:11 PM »
It looks like it prefers gravelly soil and cool flowing spring water. Maybe find a grower farther north and trade for tropical fruits?

Organic Cavalry

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2019, 03:10:49 AM »

CanadaGrower

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2019, 02:34:25 PM »
Wasabi is notoriously hard to grow. They are typically grown near riverbanks where the temperatures are mild year round. The normal wait time is 3 years from plant to harvest. That being said, there is a grower on Vancouver Island who grows hydroponically in greenhouses I believe it took him around 10 years of research to do it however.

vall

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2019, 02:30:43 PM »
I bought a small root from a Japanese market about 5 years ago.  Ate half of it and left the other half in a ziploc in the fridge and forgot about it.  I guess the fridge was a good environment because it sprouted a few leaves, but I never planted it.
- Val

gnappi

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2019, 12:59:09 PM »
Years ago around the year 1995 BY (before youtube when people had to read and learn to spell) I read an article about an American entrepreneur from I think it was Washington State or Oregon who went to Japan wanting to learn to grow wasabi.

The growers there were amused thinking he would never succeed and gave him lots of help.

It turned out that the area he picked was climatically very much like the most successful wasabi growing areas in Japan and he did well.

At any rate, I've been in Japan and most of Asia and the horseradish we get here is not like real wasabi.

Wasabi AFAIK is in some respects like watercress needing clean fresh and cool running water, something not readily available south of the states in the northern U.S.
Regards,

   Gary

roblack

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2019, 10:41:27 AM »
Might be a way of growing it indoors, in a climate controlled hosing and with aquariums, good flow, and a chiller. Would be a fun but expensive endeavor.

Any leads on finding true wasabi in the US would be greatly appreciated. Been hunting for a while. 

Organic Cavalry

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2019, 10:55:06 AM »
Place in Oregon sells wasabi all kinds of stuff. I am going to get my set-up ready before I spend a bunch of money, then I will do some experimental plantings. As they say there's more than one way to skin a cat.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2019, 01:36:26 AM »
Place in Oregon sells wasabi all kinds of stuff. I am going to get my set-up ready before I spend a bunch of money, then I will do some experimental plantings. As they say there's more than one way to skin a cat.
You will probably be successfull at growing wasabi.
Without running water,the rizomes will be smaller but i think that is a good thing in case you only want a little fresh wasabi for a day.
Same like my horseradish its small but i like that so that i dont dig a giant root,then eat only half of it and then the rest i throw it away because it looses power.
Horse raddish is also verry expensive just like wasabi if you calcuulate it by kilograms/ pounds etc.
I pay 2 euros for like 50 grams of horseradish at peasants market= 20 euros a pound/40 euro a kilogram.
I like to eat a few roots of horseradish at once when i make boiled pork foots( a recipe thats not for everybody  ;D ).

Organic Cavalry

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Re: Wasabi?
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2019, 07:39:59 PM »
I do not plan on running water... I suspect it's more about getting oxygen to the roots and lots of minerals too... the fact I've seen it growing in direct sun in the soil tells me it's a plant first...

 

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