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Author Topic: 20 year old mango tree removal  (Read 1426 times)

buddy roo

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20 year old mango tree removal
« on: October 28, 2019, 10:48:35 PM »
Hi all, does anyone have any experience in removing large mango trees?? can it realistically be done?? or is it not worth the effort?? I have one that I want to remove but before i offer it to someone I would like to know that they have a  reasonable chance with it.     

OCchris1

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2019, 12:47:23 AM »
I think (forum member) Jonny Redland moved a pretty large tree. Hit him up. Ive seen videos on it and its not as bad as you'd think.
-Chris

Tommyng

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2019, 06:10:23 AM »
Itís a mango tree, they are a relatively tough species. You can cut the tree down to reduce water loss and dig up a smaller rootball for easier transplants. Lychees trees are on the other end of the spectrum.
Donít rush, take time and enjoy life and food.

spaugh

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2019, 02:45:13 PM »
Patrick, I would wait until late spring so the tree can push some leaves after being transplanted.  Assuming that what youare asking that it can be transplanted?
Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2019, 07:48:21 PM »
I agree with Brad.

Also, is there a good reason to remove the tree? If the fruit is inferior, have you considered top working the tree. The newer Zill varieties are awesome and if your tree is large and healthy, you can top work and get fruit from the tree in about 2-3 years.

Simon

OCchris1

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2019, 12:46:09 AM »
I agree as well. I was mainly saying its not that tough a job to undertake. Good luck buddy
-Chris

FV Fruit Freak

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2019, 02:03:21 AM »
Patrick, I would wait until late spring so the tree can push some leaves after being transplanted.  Assuming that what youare asking that it can be transplanted?

Hey Brad do you think this is true for most fruit trees? I was under the impression itís also good to plant/transplant in early fall so the trees will push their energy into the roots? I was planing on putting a pretty good sized loquat in the ground this week after the Santa Anaís chill out. Thanks.
Nate

spaugh

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2019, 11:21:00 AM »
Patrick, I would wait until late spring so the tree can push some leaves after being transplanted.  Assuming that what youare asking that it can be transplanted?

Hey Brad do you think this is true for most fruit trees? I was under the impression itís also good to plant/transplant in early fall so the trees will push their energy into the roots? I was planing on putting a pretty good sized loquat in the ground this week after the Santa Anaís chill out. Thanks.

I'm specifically talking about digging up a mango tree.  They need heat to grow.  Not the same as digging up a deciduous tree. 

Transplanting things from a pot can be done anytime for the most part. 
Brad Spaugh

shaneatwell

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2019, 02:15:41 PM »
I've seen it recommended for difficult oak trees to prune the roots around the tree a foot or two out from the trunk a year in advance so that the root ball can thicken up. I.e. spade around the tree and then just leave it there for a good while.
Shane

strkpr00

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2019, 08:29:16 PM »
I would also reduce the canopy due to the loss of roots.

sapote

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2019, 03:16:05 PM »
Patrick, I would wait until late spring so the tree can push some leaves after being transplanted.  Assuming that what youare asking that it can be transplanted?

Hey Brad do you think this is true for most fruit trees? I was under the impression it’s also good to plant/transplant in early fall so the trees will push their energy into the roots? I was planing on putting a pretty good sized loquat in the ground this week after the Santa Ana’s chill out. Thanks.

You don't want to have a dig up weak mango that may die in the cold winter. Do this in late spring or early summer. Remove 90% of the leaves just before digging.

pineislander

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2019, 03:19:00 PM »
a 20 year old tree you wil need to remove 90% of limbs to get it down the road.

sc4001992

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2019, 02:39:56 AM »
Patrick,
I dug up an old mango (about 10+yr old) and transplanted to another yard same day. It died in about 6 months, did not have much roots except for a few large roots that I had to cut off to dig a 3 ft diameter root ball. I have done similar transplant on persimmon, aprium, loquat, citrus trees planted in-ground and transferred into large pots/containers and they did survive (also all about 10 yrs old). My mango tree did not have much smaller roots so that may be the reason it didn't make it. I did trim back all the branches on the mango trees and left only minimum green branches on it after the transplanting.

buddy roo

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2019, 10:56:53 AM »
thanks for the input guys, this tree is just in a bad spot being shaded on 3 sides it does have excellent fruit so it will be transplanted elsewhere, I am going to use this spot to plant some garcinia's and plant a couple more mango's on the east side of my yard where they will get full sun

sahai1

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Re: 20 year old mango tree removal
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2019, 02:14:37 PM »
I dug up a 3 year mango seedling by excavator that was in a new ditch line, dug a small hole with excavator in new spot, put it in, covered with mulch, not only survived, but looked like it enjoyed the move.  It was 10 feet tall, and lost all leaves before recovering.

20 year old.. I thought you were asking on advice on how to cut down with a chainsaw :)  good luck

 

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