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Author Topic: True hardiness of Flying Dragon  (Read 508 times)

Millet

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Re: True hardiness of Flying Dragon
« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2019, 03:58:09 PM »
I have never seen FD or poncirus hybrids ever come out of dormancy with just a  couple days of warm weather.  It often takes a week or more of warm weather to bring them out of dormancy.

Florian

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Re: True hardiness of Flying Dragon
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2019, 04:01:04 PM »
I have never seen FD or poncirus hybrids ever come out of dormancy with just a  couple days of warm weather.  It often takes a week or more of warm weather to bring them out of dormancy.

Same here. However, this year, snow in May did kill a lot of flowers but that's another story.

Ilya11

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Re: True hardiness of Flying Dragon
« Reply #27 on: November 07, 2019, 05:48:47 PM »
For winter grafting I transfer poncirus plants from the ground to the warm room environment.
It takes almost 2 weeks for them to start vegetation.
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                       Ilya

Bomand

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Re: True hardiness of Flying Dragon
« Reply #28 on: November 07, 2019, 06:00:12 PM »
Not familiar with that type of climate. I will take your word for it. Seems reasonable to me. Other rootstocks I have seen put new groth out too early and get burned. I have also seen trees do the same. Freak cold snap. The greatest clock is: Here in the South when the pecan trees bud out....there will be no more frost or cold weather.

kumin

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Re: True hardiness of Flying Dragon
« Reply #29 on: November 07, 2019, 06:53:41 PM »
Southeastern PA in the US doesn't see much Poncirus damage in the spring. Prunus cultivars often suffer from freeze damage at time of bloom. Last year citranges began growth in the very beginning of May with no new damage at that point. The northern US is entering a period of unusually cold weather at present and I expect all late growth on both Poncirus as well as Poncirus hybrids to be damaged, or destroyed. Our fall was quite moderate until recently. The forecast low temperature for next week is 16 degrees F (-8.8 C). This is no problem in 6-8 weeks, but is a bit harsh this early in the season.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2019, 07:21:15 PM by kumin »

 

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