Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: The War on Root Rot  (Read 336 times)

CanadianCitrus

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 18
    • Canada
    • View Profile
The War on Root Rot
« on: November 04, 2019, 07:18:05 PM »
Good day all!

So I pretty much have exclusively posted on the topic of root rot. It comes as no surprise that growing citrus in Canada is a challenge. So following Milletís recipe (for the most part) I have entered a new phase of the war on root rot.

Here I have added 1 part potting soil. I chose to use potting soil as the wood chips I bought were on the bigger side so I strayed from the recipe slightly instead of using peat. The potting soil I am using is predominately peat FYI.



Next I added sand. As you can see it is blue and white because the store where I bought the reptile bark from only had this type of sand.



Finally I used reptile bark. I couldnít find any small enough for quarter inch. Mostly big stuff, a third of an inch all the way up to half inch.



For a pot I am using an air root pruning pot for max aeration.



Time to see if my Eureka seedling will survive/thrive or die.



The indoor/basement growing season has begun. If anyone has any growing tips let me know!

Thanks all!

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3408
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2019, 08:49:47 PM »
They must sell a different type of reptile bark than here in Colorado.  The brand I have used is calle Repti Bark by Zoo-Med.   However, your bark should be entirely fine to use. You did not mention the ratio of the three ingredients.  Is it close to a 5-1-3?

Laaz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 938
    • Charleston, SC 9a
    • View Profile
    • Citrusgrowers forum
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2019, 05:54:28 AM »
Turface MVP you can't beat it...

CanadianCitrus

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 18
    • Canada
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2019, 06:49:15 AM »
Millet,

After reviewing previous posts on the forum it was my understanding that the growing media was a 5-1-1 ration and the 5-1-3 ratio was for nutrients. I know the Turface is getting great reviews from everyone here but the cost to have it shipped here was not worth it in my opinion and I have yet to find it at a local green house.

I will keep everyone updated on the outcome. After itís first watering I suspect that my plants will get thirsty very quickly!

Laaz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 938
    • Charleston, SC 9a
    • View Profile
    • Citrusgrowers forum
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2019, 07:10:00 AM »
SiteOne Landscape in Canada is a Turface dealer.

SeaWalnut

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 686
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2019, 08:13:41 PM »
How could you buy blue sand? : ;D Thats colored sand with paint.
Otther than the disgusting color for a sand, i think it should be harmless.Its used for aquariums,terrariums etc.

lebmung

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • Romania, Bucharest,7b (inside city 8a)
    • View Profile
    • Plante tropicale
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2019, 07:04:58 PM »

Time to see if my Eureka seedling will survive/thrive or die.
The indoor/basement growing season has begun. If anyone has any growing tips let me know!

Thanks all!

You grow a seedling prone to root rot. It's not only about the soil structure.
The root rot it's caused by some fungi found naturally in any soil.
Eureka from seed is very prone to attack, even if with the perfect soil and environment at some time it will die.
Try to graft it on a rootstock. Unfortunately PT is incompatible.
Only with the use of chemicals you will save your plant, but then they will stay in the fruit.

sunny

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 412
    • Udon
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2019, 07:47:14 PM »

CanadaGrower

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
    • Vancouver, BC, Canada Zone 7
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2019, 04:12:29 PM »
Well as I have asked on previous posts, where in general are you located in Canada? There are quite  a few Canadians on this forum who are willing to help but general location would help us direct you to a specific source for your materials.

CanadianCitrus

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 18
    • Canada
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2019, 05:42:09 PM »
Hi all,

As far as growing from seed is concerned I absolutely recognize that this will be an issue for sure. All the previous issues I had came from grafted trees. I plan to buy some new trees this coming summer to get the process moving. Canadian Grower, I totally forgot to respond to your previous post and I apologize for that. I am in the Kingston area now. I suspect there should be a lot of good places near Toronto to look.

Thanks again all!

CanadaGrower

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
    • Vancouver, BC, Canada Zone 7
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2019, 07:52:41 PM »
OK, now we are getting somewhere. Based on the fact that you're in the east coast you should be able to find pine bark fines.

I see that there is a garden centre in Kingston that carries pine mulch.

http://pykefarms.com/products_prices.html

Typically out here in the west coast pine bark fines are a little less common and I have substituted this with fir which seems to work fairly well.

I hope this helps somewhat.

EDIT: More practically, check your local Home Hardware:

https://www.homehardware.ca/en/2-cuft-canada-red-garden-mulch/p/5011943?page=search-results%20page
« Last Edit: November 07, 2019, 08:03:54 PM by CanadaGrower »

sunny

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 412
    • Udon
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2019, 07:16:31 PM »
Pine bark fines consume a lot of nitrogen...citrus also needs that or will stop growing.

lebmung

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • Romania, Bucharest,7b (inside city 8a)
    • View Profile
    • Plante tropicale
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2019, 04:28:44 PM »
Look for white peat sod, larger size 30-70 mm. Clay granules as well, but not the commercial expanded ones.
I don't use too much pine bark.
Mostly white peat, clay granules, perlite, and coconut fibers. Black or red peat are not good. this is very light 4liters~1kg, fast draining. So 50 liters pot it's like 14 kg, easy to lif and move. You need to water two times a day in summer.
The pine bark mixture makes the pot heavier. for me.
I guess each of us finds it own working mixture.

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3408
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2019, 04:40:10 PM »
"Black or red peat are not good"  ???????????

lebmung

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • Romania, Bucharest,7b (inside city 8a)
    • View Profile
    • Plante tropicale
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2019, 04:17:00 PM »
"Black or red peat are not good"  ???????????

Black peat is a very dense, fine peat which holds a lot of water. Used for mushrooms and seedlings production. Found in cheap substrate mixes.
Red peat is very acidic, not easy to find. 3-4,5 pH

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3408
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2019, 04:30:51 PM »
Reason I asked about the black peat and red peat, is because I have never seen them for sale in the USA.  Just about all the peat (brown) that is used in the USA comes from Canadian peat bogs

CanadianCitrus

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 18
    • Canada
    • View Profile
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2019, 10:15:46 PM »
I am mesmerized by the wealth of knowledge this forum contains. You guys are impressive!

lebmung

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • Romania, Bucharest,7b (inside city 8a)
    • View Profile
    • Plante tropicale
Re: The War on Root Rot
« Reply #17 on: Today at 04:03:56 PM »
Black peat is harvested in Germany, and other central European countries.  Red peat as well, which we use it for acidic plants such as blueberries, colour is brown reddish.
Brown and white peat is harvested in Northern Europe, such as Latvia. Estonia and others.
Back peat has very bad aeration.
White peat has good aeration and white sod with 30-70 mm are similar to pine bark. But they decompose slower few times than pine bark, and also have good buffering capacity..This is mostly found in professional shops where one need to order it.

Reason I asked about the black peat and red peat, is because I have never seen them for sale in the USA.  Just about all the peat (brown) that is used in the USA comes from Canadian peat bogs

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers