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Author Topic: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?  (Read 814 times)

professor

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Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« on: November 15, 2019, 06:29:31 PM »
Hello. I was wondering if anyone has experience with grafting a Jackfruit to a Breadnut rootstock.  I would assume its possible since they are of the same Family and Genus however I would like to know for sure if its been done before. 
Also if possible, which grafting technique has been shown to work the best?

Thanks much.

Mike T

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2019, 06:47:22 PM »
While some interspecific grafts take and some intraspecific grafts are incompatible it would be an interesting experiment. Breadfruit on breadnut should work but I have doubts about jackfruit as they might not be genetically similar enough.

professor

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2019, 03:37:34 PM »
Another point... I read that in India they do graft breadfruit onto their wild jackfruit so I figured its likely that I could do the reverse.  Given that the jackfruit tree could naturally be twice as large as the breadfruit, not sure if I would get a smaller dwarf version, or have any issues with the tree not being able to handle the weight of the fruit, it may be best just to go with growing the jackfruit seedlings and graft to them instead of taking the risk with the breadnut.  I may however try grafting the jackfruit onto some of the 4 year old breadfruit trees that I have to get a tree with both fruit if the center trunk is not essential for support of the heavy fruit.

Mike T

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2019, 09:32:09 PM »
They can both reach nearly 20m but jackfruit can handle it a bit cooler than breadfruit can.

professor

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2019, 07:12:32 PM »
Hello Mike, Do you know how the two compare as far as water needs and humidity.  I have a 3+ dry season with nearly no rain and quite dry humidity.  The breadfruit make it, but the smaller trees that are about 1-2m tall really need watering about 1x per month when its that dry.  Do you know are the Jackfruit about the same, or do they like a bit more humidity and water than the breadfruit?

Thanks

Finca La Isla

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2019, 09:13:26 PM »
The Jakfruit will tolerate dry better than breadfruit, easily.  I know of it being used as a windbreak on Omotepe and friends have it in Orotina.
I have grafted breadfruit onto breadnut which is straight forward using a cleft graft.  I prefer using green material which might not be so easy with a cleft since the diameters are not likely to line up.  Some form of side veneer graft perhaps.
For your area I actually like Jakfruit planted as a seedling.  Planted in May they could be well developed by the time the dry comes around December or so.
Peter

Mike T

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2019, 10:42:59 PM »
Yes I agree that jackfruit is more tolerant of dry and even windy conditions and needs less water also.

professor

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2019, 10:46:55 AM »
Hello Peter, thank you for the info.  Aren't Jackfruit a bit of a crap shoot on genetics not true to seed so really unsure what you will get as far a fruit quality if simply producing from an un-grafted tree? 

I also wonder if Jackfruit could then work as a middle or upper level filtered shade tree for inter-planting with Cacao (maybe 12m), as well as provide a good wind break, since we are so windy here.  Do you think it could work well for that, or does it have to dense of a canopy/shade? 

Also, regarding my area with the dry season we have, do you think Sapote Negro would grow here?  I'm not sure about the dry season tolerance of that tree as I haven't seen any of them up this way.  Professor
 
« Last Edit: December 21, 2019, 11:04:07 AM by professor »

Finca La Isla

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2019, 04:57:40 PM »
Hi Professor,
Where are you in Guanacaste?
Black sapote certainly tolerates dry.  The best trees I have seen are in Oaxaca.  They were so loaded with fruit I didn’t recognize them.  Great quality too!
You definitely need shade for cacao there, something that doesn’t drop the leaves in the dry season.  Jakfruit can be shaped and that is what I would do.  If you plant cacao at 3m spacing I might put a Jakfruit every 3-4 rows and shape for shade extension and access to the fruit.
I think planting seedlings of good quality seed is well worth it.  Seedling jaks tend to develop faster than grafted trees and you should get some good quality fruit.
Suerte, Peter

professor

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2019, 08:38:14 PM »
Hello Peter, we are at 800' elevation with view of Ometepe island along Nicaragua border.  Problem is most of the property is North Facing with a very good slope, so we get the trade winds for 2-3 months from the NE off of the Lake and its hard on my taller trees.  The winds can dry out and strip leaves from the Cacao, and have actually blown over some of my Cashew trees that were tall.  I have lost a lot of my Banana also that were my temporary shade for the cacao first several years.  I like the idea of the Jackfruit if can be a good windbreak.  On some of the property where the wind was the worst, I just gave up on the Cacao as they wouldn't grow with the wind stress and went with Coconut trees as they don't have a problem and to help with wind break also once well established.  I am hoping Black Sapote will do well.  Not sure if best to also graft those or OK to just go from seed.  Was also looking at Clove and Cinnamon trees but not sure I can do either here with the 3+ month dry.  Do you happen to have Red Jackfruit, Black Sapote, Clove and Cinnamon seeds available?  Professor 
« Last Edit: December 22, 2019, 08:46:21 PM by professor »

Finca La Isla

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2019, 09:19:47 PM »
Hi,
I once did a fruit collection project for a large cacao farm  around there, kind of between La Carolina and Tenorio park. What about avocados for shade and production along with jakfruit. Cinnamon and clove are a little slow and wouldn’t be much use as shade for cacao.
I will have red jak seeds in a few weeks. Cinnamon can be bought from local nurseries, clove is hard to find. Black sapote is not well known. The only nursery I know of that has it grafted is Gary Zill’s which is between Orotina and Esparza. I might get some seeds of that in February, we’ll see.
I could also see canistel and Chico sapote for there. There’s some really good fruits that tolerate the dry wind.
Peter

professor

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2019, 10:30:08 PM »
Hey Peter,

OK, thanks.  I have talked to Gary Zill's, quite out of my budget for his grafted trees, I think I just need to stick with seeds and then maybe graft as needed.   I can graft the black sapote if I need to, just need to get the seeds-seedlings going for root stock then make a trip south to get branches from quality trees in 6 months if grafting is recommended for that tree.  I might need to take you up on buying the red Jakfruit seeds from you if you can put them in the mail that may be my best option. 

Avocados do very well here and I have quite a few trees but they aren't mixed in with my Cacao.  I figured they were too heavy shade, so my mangoes and avocados are in their own area.  For my cacao, I have my permanent trees Guama, guanabana, and Cashew inter planted between every 4th Cacao vertical and horizontal for one hectare, and I think the Guama have done the best for me due to its height, quick growth and reaching branches (still waiting on fruit, maybe 2020).  Many of my Cashew trees have blown over and block out nearly all the sun which those cacao aren't too happy about, so looking for something else for those areas and others where I still need some cacao upper shade. 

I am growing 5 sapodilla trees in their own area where I wanted a lot of shade for my dogs and have been quite slow growing for me here.  I'm expecting 100% shade from them, so I don't think I would do those intermixed between the Cacao.  I would consider the canistel. I haven't had canistel, but it looks like something I would like to grow and eat (have seeds?).  My mamey sapote have grown very slow as I had them in too much shade the past 4 years, so I dug them up and moved them (only 4' tall) and hope they do better in full sun.  Do the Canistel grow any faster than Mamey and Chico sapote, or do all the sapote family have about the same slow growth?

I've even considered doing some large Guapinol trees for upper shade with the cacao as the neighbors have said they are wind resistant and always have leaves during the dry season.

Professor     

Finca La Isla

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Re: Grafting Jackfruit to Breadnut rootstock?
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2019, 11:33:10 AM »
I agree that mangoes won’t work with cacao but I think that avocadoes can be shaped for shading cacao.  It’s a high value crop too.
Are your sapodillas grafted?  If not they could take forever to produce.  Both canistel and mamey sapote can begin to fruit in five years grown from seed.  Don’t let them go dormant in the dry.  A grafted and shaped níspero would allow enough light through.
I can let you know when I have the red Jakfruit seeds.
Saludos,
Peter

 

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